Road Tests and Car Reviews

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Road Tests and Car Reviews

AC Cars Road Tests and Reviews
AC Ace

AC Ace

1953 - 1963
After World War 2 AC Cars of Thames Ditton England came back into the market by releasing the two litre range in 1947. But it was not until 1953 when the company released the Ace Sportscar, that its reputation was made. The inspiration of this car was clearly Ferrari Barchetta, with the results showing an extremely pretty, open two seater with an alloy body, as well as independent transverse leaf spring suspension. More>>
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AC Cobra  

AC Cobra


1953 - 1963
AC Cars were approached in 1961 by Texan racer Carroll Shelby, with the idea of putting a Ford 4.2-litre V8 engine into the Ace sportscar. A few months later the first prototypes were produced with 100 being sent to America a short time later for completion. The result of this was the legendary Cobra, one of the fastest and most famous muscle cars of all. More>>
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AC ME3000  

AC ME3000

1979 - 1984
The story of the AC M E3000 begins with the end of the Unipower story: Peter Bohanna was asked to build a Mk II version of the popular Mini-engined GT car. The 1970s were not a good period for luxury car manufacturers and AC Managing Director W Derek Hurlock went searching for a totally new smaller car. More>>
Alfa Romeo Road Tests and Reviews
Alfa Romeo Monoposto Tipo B  

Alfa Romeo Monoposto Tipo B

1932 - 1935
WHEN THE Monoposto Alfa Romeo made its first appearance at Monza in 1932, it not only set new standards of aesthetics in racing car design, it also created something of a legend in Grand Prix history. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 2.3 Litre  

Alfa Romeo 2.3 8C 2300

1931 - 1935
The 8C 2300 fought the Bugattis, Maseratis and Mercedes during the early 1930s, both as a sports and full racing car. It was driven by a galaxy of star drivers of whom few survived, whereas a fair proportion of their machines achieved a sort of mechanical immortality. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 8C 2900  

Alfa Romeo 2.9 8C 2900

1935 - 1939
The Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 was the fastest pre-war production car - a feat no doubt attributable to the fact that it was designed as a racing car. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Alfetta Type 158/9  

Alfa Romeo Alfetta Type 158/9

1937 - 1952
Turn the clock back to 1938. The Germans were unbeatable in Grand Prix racing, a bitter fact to their nominal allies, the financially outclassed Italians. They made the best of Maserati's brilliance in 1500cc voiturette racing and drew courage from the press which continued to brag about "The triumph of the Italian colours". More>>
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Alfa Romeo 8C 2900  

Alfa Romeo Disco Volante / 1900 C 52

1952 - 1953
In 1952, even before production began on the then new 1300cc Giulietta, Alfa Romeo already had plans to build a larger version with six cylinders - tentatively called the Giulia. The larger car's engine would not be based on the 1.3-litre Giulietta but on the already existing 1900cc four with two more cylinders added. The 1900's 82.5-mm bore was retained but the stroke was increased from 88 to 92 mm, resulting in a displacement of 2995cc. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint  

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint

1954 - 1962
Having nimble handling, beautiful balance and glorious engines (the world's first mass-produced twin-cam engine) made the Giulietta Sprint one of the stars in the 50's. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 6C 3000CM Superflow  

Alfa Romeo 6C 3000CM Superflow

1956
Always one of the leaders in development of automotive form, Pinin Farina in the mid 1950s produced a series of prototypes that were nothing if not different in appearance. Even so, they held some lessons for future production models. As Len Frank tells, the beginnings of the Alfa Spider can be seen in this car; the fourth and last in the distinctive Superflow series. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato  

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato

1960
In 1960 The Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato was the lightest, smallest, best streamlined, most powerful and therefore the fastest of the entire Alfa Romeo range of cars. The 1290cc aluminium twin-cam engine was capable of producing speeds of 121.8 mph. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Zagato  

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GT

1963 - 1966
In the early 1960s Alfa-Romeo was considered, quite rightly, to be the best of all of this distinguished line of Italian-built high-performance cars. And one of the best the company had ever produced was the brilliant 105/115 Series Coupe, the Giulia 1600 Sprint GT. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 1300 GT Junior  

Alfa Romeo 1300 GT Junior

1965 - 1967
From 1965 to 1977 the baby of the Alfa sports car fleet was the 1300 GT. Not only was it an image-maker, but it was also a surprising road-goer, with plenty of urge from only a 1290cc but very eager power plant. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Spider  

Alfa Romeo Spider

1966 - 1993
The Geneva motor show of 1966 was the launch of the Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider, and was the last complete design from Battista Pininfarina. Despite initial sales being disappointing the basic model managed to stay in production for 27 years. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 1750 Sedan  

Alfa Romeo 1750 Sedan

1967 - 1972
Today most Alfa aficionados keenly seek out the GTV from the early 1970’s, however the more humble sedan has become a very rare sight on Australian roads, and may prove to be a sound investment for the astute collector. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 1750 GTV  

Alfa Romeo 1750 GTV

1967 - 1972
Coupled with the launch of the new 1750 Berlina saloon was the 1750 GTV coupe. Sharing the same coupe body as the previous GT1300/GT Junior 1.6, the GTV featured four headlamps and less fussy external trim details. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV  

Alfa Romeo 2000 GTV

1970 - 1977
Its lines were penned by a young designer at Bertone; Giorgietto Giugiaro, 'the designer of the 20th century'. The Giulia not only looked good but it also proved a great competitor in touring car racing. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Montreal  

Alfa Romeo Montreal

1970 - 1975
The 2.6 all alloy quad cam V8 engine was a jem, so much so that journalists at the time thought it made the chassis look mediocre. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Alfasud  

Alfa Romeo Alfasud

1972 - 1983
Produced at Alfa's new factory in South Italy, (hence the name Alfasud - "Alfa South"), the Alfasud was produced as a more affordable Alfa for the many enthusiasts. More>>
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Alfa Romeo GTV6  

Alfa Romeo Alfetta GT

1974 - 1976
The Alfetta GT's design came about as a result of joint labours of Giorgetto Giugiaro and Alfa's own design team, the Alfetta GT being one of the most beautiful cars to look at, and because of a combination of slightly less weight and uprated suspension the GT felt tauter than the sedan. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Eagle  

Alfa Romeo Eagle

1975
Pinninfarina's Alfa Romeo Eagle was a project for a sports "Spider" with a safety roll bar, based on the bodypan and mechanics of the Alfetta GT. More>>
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Alfa Romeo Alfa 6  

Alfa Romeo Alfa 6

1979 - 1986
Alfa Romeo's in-line 'six', the 2600, was discontinued in 1969, so for ten years the Milanese manufacturer lacked a six-cylinder flagship. In early 1979 the place was filled by the Alfa 6 saloon, at the time it being the only six-cylinder Italian car in realistic production. More>>
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Alfa Romeo GTV6  

Alfa Romeo GTV6

1979 - 1986
The new V6 engine had virtually no protractors. Although it had single camshaft per bank, it was extremely smooth, willing, and musical and was regarded by most to be the best V6 in production. More>>
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Alfa Romeo GTV 2.0  

Alfa Romeo GTV 2.0

1981 - 1987
There were two features of the GTV which gave it a major advance over all previous examples. Firstly, thanks to continual complaints, Alfa Romeo improved the driving position. You no longer needed to fold your knees around your ears and hold your arms out straight ahead. For all export models, Alfa also fitted an attractive looking wood rimmed steering wheel with a dished boss. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 75

Alfa Romeo 75

1986 - 1992
The Alfa 75 was a sports car for the family man, something rare from the typical box-on-wheels approach adopted by more mainstream manufacturers during the 1980's. The ensuing budget restrictions forced Alfa to evolve the old 1970's Alfasud and Alfetta platforms rather than produce a clean-sheet design from the get-out. More>>
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Alfa Romeo 164

Alfa Romeo 164

1987 - 1998
Alfa Romeo's 164 always enjoyed a few advantages over the competition in the upper region of the executive car class. And a lot was to do with marque pedigree. The Fiat-owned Italian company, at the time, had no difficulty establishing itself as a recognized contender for the executive dollar because it had always attracted that market anyway. More>>
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Alfa Romeo SZ  

Alfa Romeo SZ

1989 - 1990
The "SZ" was a one-off production sports cardesigned and built by Zagato, and while the styling can be described as extraordinary even by Zagato's standard, many regarded it as ugly. More>>
Allard Road Tests and Reviews
Allard J2X

Allard J2 and J2X

1950 - 1953
The original competition two-seater J1 was replaced by the legendary J2 in 1950; this latter iteration was manufactured with an aluminium body, separate cycle-type wings, a ladder-style frame, coil spring independent front suspension, and a De Dion rear end. The J2 boasted an impressive top speed of 110 mph, helped in the main by its fitment of a 160bhp Cadillac V8 power plant, although Allard allowed a variety of different engines to be fitted. More>>
Alvis Road Tests and Reviews
Alvis TD21

Alvis TD21, TE21, TF21

1958 - 1967
Alvis turned to Graber of Switzerland after the war to design a new body style for their GT lineup. The TD21 was beautiful from every angle, the simple and handsome lines never dating like the more mainstream. The bodies for the TD21 were manufactured in England, first by Willowbrook in Loughborough, then later by Park Ward. More>>
AMC Road Tests and Reviews
AMC Rambler Classic  

AMC Rambler Classic

1961- 1966
The Rambler was the focus of AMC's management strategy under the leadership of George W. Romney. American Motors designed and built some of the most fuel-efficient, best-styled and well-made cars of the 1950s and 1960s. Their compact cars (for the era) helped AMC to achieve sales and corporate profit successes. More>>
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AMC Rambler 770  

AMC Rambler 770

1963 - 1966
The Rambler 770 may have been, by the American definition, a "Compact", but the standards of just about any other country, it remained very much a large car. Like the large American cars then available, the 770 was both conventional and familiar, the mechanical specification including a long-stroke six-cylinder engine, live rear axle with coil springs, torque tube and a Panhard rod, and large diameter drum brakes all round. More>>
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AMC Rambler 770  

AMC Marlin

1965 - 1966
Unlike any other U.S. auto manufacturer from the 1960s, American Motors chose to base their entire line around compactness and economy. And this paid off handsomely. By getting a head start on the compact craze, they were able to step right up and supply the demand with proven compacts while competitors were in the throes of de-bugging and introducing theirs. More>>
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AMC Rebel  

AMC Rebel

1967 - 1970
The AMC Rebel (known as the Rambler Rebel in 1967) was a mid-sizer built between 1967 and 1970. The Rebel was based on AMC's "senior" automobile platform shared with the full-size Ambassador line. For the U.S. and Canadian markets, the Rebel was built at AMC's "West Assembly Line" (along with the Ambassador) in Kenosha, Wisconsin and at Brampton, Ontario, Canada (Bramalea - Brampton Assembly Plant). More>>
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AMC AMX  

AMC AMX

1968 - 1970
IHere in Australia the AMX was imported by AMI - it being a short, aggressive two-seater based on the identically priced Javelin but measuring a full 12 inches shorter in both wheelbase and overall length. It effectively condensed the red-blooded American image of the Javelin into a compact, rorty car with which the driver could achieve a feeling of one-ness that was usually only confined to European cars. Yet it did this without losing its U.S.-bred image. More>>
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AMC Javelin  

AMC Javelin

1968 - 1974
In 1968 AMC needed to create a 'cult' car, something to give the company prestige and win back customers that were deserting it for the ever growing popularity of the Ford Mustang. Also in AMC's sights was the Chevy Comaro and Plymouth Barracuda. More>>
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AMC Hornet  

AMC Hornet


1970 - 1977
Built on a 108-inch wheelbase, the new Hornet sedans had a long hood/short rear deck styling theme that was in line with the public tastes at the time. These basic elements had been used in 1969 for the new Ford Maverick compact car, which had proven to be immensely popular. More>>
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AMC Pacer

AMC Pacer

1975 - 1980
Information being compiled. More>>

 

Amphicar Road Tests and Reviews
Amphicar

Amphicar

1961 - 1968
Built for 7 years between 1961 and 1968, the Amphicar is unique for its ability to traverse both land and sea, however the compromise to achieve both resulted in poor roadholding ability and very limited sea-going ability. More>>
Ascort Road Tests and Reviews
Ascort TSV 1300  

Ascort TSV 1300

1958 - 1959
Apart from a prototype, production of the Ascort TSV 1300 started in January, 1959 – with the intention that the company would be able to build one a week. Mechanically it was based on the VW Beetle, plus some Porsche components and Okrasa performance modifications. The idea was to have all spares available locally, and enable any VW-Porsche service centre to do the servicing. More>>
Aston-Martin Road Tests and Reviews
Aston Martin Mark II  

Aston Martin Mark II

1934 - 1936
Back in 1934 the British motoring journal, "The Autocar", published a road test of a truly fabulous sports car. Nothing unusual, you say. True, but what was written about this car could be classed as unusual because it was (and is) a rare occurrence for an English journalist to judge an English product as being so particularly praiseworthy. More>>
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Aston Martin DB2  

Aston Martin DB2

1950 - 1959
The Aston Martin DB2 of 1950 was seen as the benchmark car for all future Astons. This was due to the coupe's luxurious and old-world charm that hosted a smooth (but powerful) six-cylinder twin-cam 116bhp engine from the Lagonda 2.6 saloon. More>>
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Aston Martin DB2/4  

Aston Martin DB2/4

1950 - 1959
The DB2/4 was established in 1953 comprising a smooth and contoured fastback shape that was seen as far more practical because of its rear seats and side-hinged rear hatch that stretched the length by some 9 centimetres from the DB 2. More>>
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Aston Martin DB Mk III  

Aston Martin DB Mk III

1950 - 1959
The twin SU carburettors stayed. David Brown had supplied the gearboxes on all DB models. It had a crash first gear and the option of overdrive on top gear on the MK III which gave 28.4 mph per 1000rpm. More>>
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Aston Martin DB4  

Aston Martin DB4

1958 - 1963
Things didn't change quickly at Aston Martin during the 1950's, and nor should they have, given the Aston's were arguably the best sporting cars ever made. Much like the Mercedes philosophy, change for change's sake was not a principal held in high regard. More>>
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Aston Martin DB5  

Aston Martin DB5

1963 - 1965
This car was introduced to Britain in 1963 and, at the time, was considered to be an aristocrat amongst sportscars of its time. It was extremely pricey, with the E-Type Jaguar being about half of its cost, but its use on the James Bond movie "Goldfinger" (1964) released the Aston Martin name to the entire world. More>>
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Aston Martin V8  

Aston Martin V8

1969 - 1990
In 1969 the quad-cam all-alloy 375 bhp V8 catapulted the Aston to a top speed of 257 km/h. In 1973 its shape had altered with a new grille and single lamps on either side. More>>
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Aston Martin Lagonda  

Aston Martin Lagonda

1976 - 1986
The 1976 showing of the Lagonda saloon showed the world a car that appeared to have originated from another planet. More>>
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Aston Martin V8 Vantage  

Aston Martin V8 Vantage

1977 - 1989
A breathtakingly exciting, adrenalin churning super-car, the fastest accelerating production car in the World at the time, that was the Aston Martin V8 Vantage. More>>
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Aston Martin Bulldog

Aston Martin Bulldog

1980
By 1978 the future of Aston looked much better than it ever had, and so Company Director Alan Curtis gave the green light for the construction of a prototype – a car that would serve as a symbol of the marques quest to look to the future and demonstrate innovation like no other. More>>
Auburn Road Tests and Reviews
Auburn 852 Speedster

Auburn Speedster

1935 - 1937
By 1930 Auburn had a stellar reputation for building highly desirable cars, particularly after one Erret Lobban Cord had taken control. Despite the economic hardships he inherited, his drive and passion for the automobile would not only help Auburn survive, but survive at a time that would see many manufacturers fall by the way, particularly at the upper end of the market. More>>
Audi Road Tests and Reviews
Audi 100 C1  

Audi 100 C1

1968 - 1976
The origins of the first Audi 100 have become legendary in Germany. When Volkswagen purchased Auto Union from Mercedes-Benz in 1965, they seem to have been motivated by a desperate shortage of production capacity for their ’Beetle’ model which at that time was selling faster than the cars could be produced. More>>
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Audi 80  

Audi 80

1971 - 1995
Manufactured from 1971 until 1995, the Audi 80 shared its platform with the parent company’s Volkswagen Passat. The first incarnation was designated the B1, and was available from 1972 to 1978. Sold in some markets (including Australia and the US) as the Audi Fox, the Audi 80 was available in either 2 door coupe or 4 door sedan body styles. More>>
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Audi 100 C2  

Audi 100 C2

1976 - 1984
The main features of the Audi 100 C2 were its cleanness and purity of line, a forward facing surface with no openings, and - for the first time - side windows completely flush with the body sides. More>>
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Audi 100 C2  

Audi 200 5T C2

1976 - 1984
By 1979 Germany remained the only 'western' European country with no-limit motorways, so it was not surprising that it had a large market for fast luxury cars. Mercedes-Benz and BMW of course took the lion's share of the sector, but Audi's decision to invade the area in 1976 with their front-drive '100' was significant as well as courageous. More>>
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Audi 5E  

Audi 5E

1979 - 1983
The Audi 5E was a good example of modern European car design. It incorporated all the latest technological advances available in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s. It was not cheap, mainly due the high import tariffs being imposed at the time, but for those seeking a better car, it represented excellent value. More>>
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Audi 5E CD  

Audi 5E CD

1979 - 1983
The 5E CD marked Volkswagen's entry into the luxury market. The designation “CD” stood for 'Corps Dipiomatique', a term used to indicate the very high level of equipment offered as standard on this particular model. The CD was fitted with just about every available luxury feature as standard. The equipment offered included air-conditioning, automatic transmission, power-assisted steering, AM/FM radio/cassette stereo and central locking. More>>
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Audi Quattro  

Audi Quattro

1980
Arguably the greatest driver's car of the 80's, the original Audi Quattro had superb handling due to its innovative 4wd system. The Quattro was also innovative in that Audi had become the first car maker to put full-time 4wd to mass production. That's easy to understand, since the contemporary 4wd systems of the time were heavy, energy-inefficient and expensive. Moreover, for most road cars, 4wd was always thought to be unnecessary. More>>
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Audi 100 C3  

Audi 100 C3

1983 - 1992
When Audi released the 100, its lines, styling and coefficient of drag stunned the motor industry. The car, as a production model, had been designed in complete reverse of accepted practice. Instead of designing a car to meet its carrying and performance parameters, then smoothing out the styling, instead Audi designed it in reverse. More>>
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Audi 90  

Audi 90

1985 - 1995
The Audi 90's competition came from the Mercedes 200-series and from BMW's upper 5-series models. It was a tough job to take on such competition, where image was what it was all about in this sector of the market. More>>
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Audi RS2  

Audi RS2

1994
In 1994 Audi contracted Porsche to help them develop and manufacture a faster road going car than their current S2 Avant - the result was the RS2. Based on the S2 Avant, Porsche installed a bigger KKK turbocharger to the 2.2-litre 20 valve 5-cylinder engine. Boost pressure was raised from 1.1 to 1.4 bar, and a revised engine management programme coupled to a modified exhaust increased power to an awesome 315hp. More>>
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Audi TT

Audi TT

1998 -
Few would guess that the beautiful Audi TT shares components with parent company VW's Golf, or even that of the Skoda. Despite VW's common component strategy, Audi engineers were able to develop the beautiful sports coupe using the Golf floorpan and basic 1.8 litre engine (also fitted to some Skoda's). More>>

 

Austin Road Tests and Reviews
Austin 7  

Austin 7

1922 - 1939
Austin backed his cars in motor sport, and while he had very few successes that would change in 1928 when his son-in-law, Captain Arthur Waite, took out the 1928 Australian Grand Prix in a supercharged Austin 7 known as "Slippery Anne". Other nick-names were bestowed upon the Seven, some referring to it as the "...finest Meccano set yet produced". Despite its lack of roadholding and hopeless brakes, it was well put togther and long lasting. More>>
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Austin 10  

Austin 10

1932 - 1939
Launched in 1932, the Austin 10 would become the companies best seller for the remainder of the decade, then continuing in production (albiet with significant revisions) right up until 1947. Conservatively designed, the Austin 10 used a pressed steel body built on a cross braced chassis. Foot to the floor, going downhill and with a slight tail wind, the 10 could easily reach 55mph. More>>
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Austin A90 Atlantic  

Austin A90 Atlantic

1948 - 1952
The A90 Atlantic was first built in prototype form in 1947 being the first British car to be designed for the U.S market. Upon its launch in 1948, it became an overnight sensation. More>>
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Austin A70 Hampshire  

Austin A70 Hampshire

1948 - 1950
On the outside, the Austin A70 Hampshire featured a modern, yet functional streamlining embodied in the design. The front wings swept back along the sides and merged into the all-enclosed rear fenders resulting in a very attractive appearance which we think looks ultra-cool these days. More>>
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Austin A40 Somerset  

Austin A70 Hereford

1950 - 1954
Affordable and popular they may have been, but the middle and larger sizes of the Austin range were hardly high-performance cars. Perhaps the word performance should not be used when describing the A.70, however it is fair to say that the Hereford took on an entirely different character from that associated with this famous make up to 1939. More>>
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Austin A40 Somerset  

Austin A40 Somerset

1951 - 1953
The Austin A40 Somerset was launched in 1951 and had a short production run of just two years. It was similar in appearance to the smaller A30 saloon car, but was built on a separate chassis unlike the A30 which was Austin's first unitary construction car. More>>
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Austin A30  

Austin A30

1951 - 1956
The Austin A30 saloon car was introduced in 1951 and featured a newly designed 803cc four cylinder overhead valve engine which later became known as the A series engine. More>>
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Austin A50 Cambridge  

Austin A50 Cambridge

1954 - 1957
With the merger of Nuffield and Austin it was not surprising that BMC's Austin A50 Cambridge closely resembled the Morris Oxford Series II, not only in power unit but also in body lines. The engine was the same but, due to its slightly lower weight, the Cambridge had superior acceleration. Road-holding, however, was not so good. More>>
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Austin Metropolitan 1500  

Austin Metropolitan 1500

1954 - 1968
The first Austin Metropolitan sported the 1,200 cc A40 engine, but in March 1957 this was replaced by the A50 unit, making it the cheapest 1½ litre car on the U.K. market. A further distinction was that it was the only model manufactured in the UK that came with a built-in radio as standard equipment. More>>
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Austin A35  

Austin A35 and A35 Countryman

1956 - 1968
Mechanically the A35 was fairly standard, with independent/coil springs front suspension, a beam axle and semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear, and worm type steering. While the new engine gave the A35 better performance, much of the improvment was actually the result of different gearbox ratios, which were better spaced. More>>
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Austin A105  

Austin A105

1956 - 1959
The A105 model of the Austin was a livelier version of the A95. It was more powerful than the stock A95, and in deluxe version was fitted with an automatic transmission. The increase in output over the A95 amounted to 17 horsepower, thanks to a higher engine compression combined with twin S.U. carburettors (instead of the single Zenith used on the A95). More>>
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Austin A55  

Austin A55 Cambridge

1957 - 1959
The A55 Austin Cambridge was manufactured from 1957 through to 1959, and was replaced by the Farina A55 Cambridge model. Externally the A55 was much like the older A50 but with a slightly longer tail, hooded headlights and fancier chrome-work on the sides. The Austin engineers uprated the engine by raising the compression ratio from 7.3 to 8.3 to 1; this giving the 1489cc B type B.M.C. motor 51 bhp @ 4250 rpm. More>>
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Austin Lancer  

Austin Lancer

1958 - 1962
The Austin Lancer and Morris Major evolved though three series (I, II and Elite), with the first incarnations being badge engineered clones of the contemporary Wolseley 1500 and Riley One-Point-Five models then on sale in the United Kingdom. These models were wholly produced at BMC's Zetland plant in Sydney, Australia and were unique to that country, having around 98% local content. Many examples were also exported to New Zealand. More>>
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Austin A40 Farina  

Austin A40 Farina

1958 - 1967
The A40 "Farina" is the best and most fondly remembered A40 in Australia. First introduced in 1958, it would remain in production until 1967, after which time over 340,000 had been manufactured. The wonderful and innovative body style came courtesy of Pinin Farina (thus the name), and the best feature was undoubtedly the revolutionary “hatchback” style, a world first. More>>
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Austin Freeway  

Austin Freeway

1962 - 1966
The 6 cylinder Austin Freeway sedan and station wagon, and Wolseley 24/80 were released in April 1962. These cars were developed by BMC Australia to counter the growing popularity of the new 6 cylinder rivals from the US, namely the GM Holden and Ford Falcon. More>>
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Austin 1800  

Austin 1800

1965 - 1970
When introduced, the 1800 was far from ordinary. It soon became affectionately known as the “landcrab”, in reference to the elongated and low slung body style. Voted European Car of the Year for 1965, BMC were certainly on a winner with their new “large” car. More>>
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Austin 3 Litre  

Austin 3 Litre

1967 - 1971
The Austin 3 Litre was a substantial car, expanding upon the successful formula of front engined rear wheel drive, whilst incorporating many design features which had made the Mini's, 1100's and 1800's so outstanding. Significantly, it was also the first Austin production car to have all-independent suspension and rear wheel drive. More>>
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Austin Maxi  

Austin Maxi

1969 - 1981
The Austin Maxi was a medium sized 5-door hatchback car from British Leyland for the 1970s. It was the first British five speed five-door hatchback. The Maxi (code name ADO14) was the last car designed under the British Motor Corporation (BMC), and was the last production car designed by Alec Issigonis. More>>
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Austin Marina GT  

Austin Marina GT

1973 - 1975
We know it as the Morris Marina in Australia, but in the USA it was sold as the Austin Marina. At the cars release the Chairman of British Leyland was Sir Donald Stokes, who was quoted as saying that his company was not in business to make cars but to make money. They got one part of the formula right – they sure didn’t make cars. More>>
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Austin Allegro  

Austin Allegro

1973 - 1983
Designed as a replacement for the wonderful Austin 1100/1300, the Allegro promised much, but delivered little. A victim of the ailing British car industry of the time, the Allegro featured poor design, insipid performance, appalling build quality, non existent re-sale value wrapped in a design that not even a mother could love. More>>
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Austin Princess  

Austin Princess

1975 - 1981
Originally starting out as design code ADO71, then marketed as the Austin/Morris/Wolseley 18–22 series, then renamed "Princess". Technically a new marque created by British Leyland, the name had previously been used as a model on the Austin Princess limousine from 1947 to 1956. The car later appeared in revamped form as the Austin Ambassador, which was produced from 1982 until 1984 and only ever sold in Britain. More>>
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Austin Mini Metro  

Austin Mini Metro

1980 - 1987
Seven years of planning, design, replanning, redesign, and more than £275 million went into British Leylands Austin Mini Metro. Although not as revolutionary as Alec Issigonis' Morris/Austin Mini was in 1959, the then new front-drive model from the nationalised British factories was nevertheless an attractive little family car. More>>
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Austin Maestro

Austin Maestro

1983 - 1994
The Austin Maestro was a very important car. In fact, it was the key to the continued existence of British Leyland itself; the Metro was the first step along the road to recovery, but complete salvation could only be achieved if the more profitable Maestro became a success. More>>
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Austin Montego

Austin Montego

1984 - 1995
The Montego, Austin Rover's long-promised four door front-drive notchback, was released in the UK in late April in a range of models. While the 2.0-litre MG and VP (Vanden Plas) versions were widely regarded as being very disappointing, the 1.6-litre bread-and-butter models - better "Ford Cortina replacements" than anything Ford Europe had by then produced - were much more likeable. More>>
Austin Healey Road Tests and Reviews
Healey Westland  

Healey Westland

1946 - 1950
Donald Healey stole a march on car makers around the world when he created the Healey Westland. After the war most European car plants had been flattened by bombing, even the British and American plants had been on war work and they took time to switch back. Most companies revised old designs and rushed those into the showrooms while they planned what to make next. More>>
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Austin Healey 100  

Austin Healey 100

1952 - 1956
Donald Healey's very first iteration was put on display at the 1952 Earls Court Show, and so impressed was BMC's managing director Leonard Lord that a deal was struck, so next morning the model on the stand had a new badge which announced to the world that this was the new Austin Healey 100. More>>
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Austin Healey 100  

Austin Healey 100 Six

1956 - 1959
This car was very similar in appearance to the 4 cylinder 100, but this time the car was fitted with a tuned version of the six cylinder BMC C series engine fitted to the Austin Westminster. More>>
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Austin Healey Sprite  

Austin Healey Sprite

1958 - 1961
In 1958 few sports cars were more endearing that the Austin Sprite. It earned the nickname of "Frogeye" due to its pop-eyed headlights and somewhat gaping grin. More>>
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Austin Healey 3000  

Austin Healey 3000

1959 - 1967
The United States was seen as the car's biggest market which ironically brought the downfall of the 3000 due to strict safety legislation. More>>
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Austin Healey Sprite Mk3

Austin Healey Sprite Mark III

1964 - 1966
Hugely popular since its introduction in 1958, the Austin Healey Sprite (and MG Midget) over 110,000 had rolled off the prooduction line at Abingdon-on-Thames, helping to make the traditional home of M.G. cars the largest factory in the world, during the 1960's, devoted to the production of sports cars. More>>
Auto Union Road Tests and Reviews
Auto Union 1000

Auto Union 1000

1958 - 1963
In 1958 Auto Union brought back into prominence the name of a group which made DKW, Audi, Horch and Wanderer cars before the war, but lost all its factories, which were in the Eastern Zone of Germany, when the war ended. Manufacture of DKW cars was re-started in the West, and the new model was based on the three-cylinder front-drive DKW, with larger engine, and improved suspension. More>>
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Auto Union DKW F12

Auto Union DKW F12

1964 - 1968
In 1964 the obscure (at least for most Australians) company "Auto Union" of Germany introduced their new model DKW F12/60, which was available in both sedan and roadster forms and was fitted with a sweet 2-stroke 899cc engine. More>>
Avia Road Tests and Reviews
Avia

Avia Twelve and Fifteen 350cc

1956 - 1957
The Avia had a lot of things going for it, apart from the low price of course. Unlike most post-war midgets, the Avia actually looked like a scaled-down car - it did not resemble an orphaned sidecar, like the Messerschmitt, or a mechanised egg, like the Isetta. More>>
AWZ Trabant Road Tests and Reviews
AWZ P70  

AWZ P70

1955 - 1959
In the East, the AWZ P70 was originally intended to fill this "intermediate" car role, that of a small economical 2 (and occasional +2) role. For any such car to be successful, it needed to be cheap, easy to repair, built of lightweight materials and, if possible, afford more storage than a motorcycle. More>>
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AWZ P50/P60 Trabant 500/600  

AWZ P50/P60 Trabant 500/600

1957 - 1964
To best understand the Trabant, you have to first understand the circumstances from which it was born. Post war Europe, both sides of the iron curtain, needed a form of cheap personal transportation, this demand being met by motorcycles and mopeds (the latter most successfully by the wonderful Vespa's). More>>
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AWZ Trabant 601

AWZ P601 Trabant

1964 - 1991
In 1964 AWZ released the most famous of the Trabants, the P601. This new car had a 594 cc, 26 bhp engine naturally enough derived from the P50. One should not expect too much in the way of innovation when detailing new models of Trabant, however this engine did use new cylinders, new cylinder-heads and a modified exhaust system. More>>
Bentley Road Tests and Reviews
Bentley 3 Litre  

Bentley 3 Litre

1924 - 1930
Ettore Bugatti once described the Bentley 3 litre as "The fastest lorry in the world". This awesome 2+ tonne monster won 5 times at the Le Mans 24 Hour between 1924 and 30 in various forms, perhaps proving to Bugatti that trucks at the time were also more reliable than motor cars! More>>
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Bentley Continental  

Bentley Continental S1

1952 - 1955
This car was seen as one of the most desirable vehicles in the 1950's. Not only because it was the fastest genuine four-seater, but also because of its beauty; stunningly elegant despite being big and swoopy. More>>
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Bentley Continental S2 V8  

Bentley Continental S2 V8

1959 - 1962
These new V8 models were built by H.J. Mulliner and Park Ward, and naturally followed the introduction of the new Rolls Royce V8 engine (as fitted to the Silver Cloud 2 and Phantom V). There were several body types, notably the Mulliner two-door hardtop and Park Ward drophead coupe, which joined the H.J. Mulliner Flying Spur four-door Continental saloon. More>>
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Bentley T Series

Bentley T Series

1967 - 1980
Rolls-Royce have only ever made one concession to badge engineering, keeping the legendary Bentley name alive. The Bentley “T” saloon was identical to the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II, apart from the distinctive radiator and badges. More>>
BMW Road Tests and Reviews
BMW 328  

BMW 328

1936 - 1940
The combinantion of a light-weight body and fully independant front suspension set new standards for the time, offering levels of roadholding, cornering and handling precision previously unheard of. It is no wonder then that many collectors consider the 328 to be the best sports car of the 1930's. More>>
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BMW 335  

BMW 335

1936 - 1940
In the 1930s, as the war clouds were gathering and Germany could boast the most advanced road system in the world, several European manufacturers started thinking about building super cars to make full use of these new super roads. Mercedes used raw power and cubic inches to push its barn-door radiators through the air at high speed, and BMW designed a streamlined “autobahn special” for release in 1936. More>>
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BMW 507  

BMW 507

1955 - 1959
The BMW 507 was arguably one of the most beautiful cars of the 1950's. Built to add a glamour car to increase American sales as well as well as boost their flagging post war image, BMW used Albrecht Goertz to design their new sportscar. More>>
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BMW Iso Isetta Bubble Car  

BMW Iso Isetta Bubble Car

1955 - 1962
With folding roof and wrap around rear window, the driver and passenger entered via a front hinged door that also lifted the steering wheel when opened. More>>
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Alpina BMW 2000C and 2000CS New Class Coupe  

BMW 2000C and 2000CS New Class Coupe

1965 - 1969
There has always been something special about the Teutonic approach to building a car. It seems the collective objective of all the German auto makers is to use a no-nonsense concept of design and the meticulous precision of assembly. More>>
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Alpina BMW 2002  

Alpina BMW 2002

1967 - 1972
Alpina's Bavarian headquarters took a BMW 1600 2-door sedan (then BMW's smallest car), installed a super-tuned 2-litre BMW engine (BMW's biggest engine) and all the attendant devices necessary to bring the chassis specifications in line with the engine. More>>
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BMW CS Series  

BMW CS Series

1971 - 1975
The CS coupes are among the best of all BMW classics, it has one of the best six-cylinder engines in the world - powerful, smooth and refined. More>>
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BMW 3.0 CSL  

BMW 3.0 CSL

1971 - 1975
The CSL was first produced in May 1971 as a lightweight version of the six cylinder coupe and to homologate for European Touring Car Group 2 races. It had thinner body panels, no front bumper, fibreglass rear bumper, racing latches to the bonnet, side windows made from Plexiglass and alloy-skinned opening panels, all to aid in weight reduction. More>>
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BMW E12 5 Series  

BMW E12 5 Series

1972 - 1981
In Australia BMW imported the 528i, and marketed it as a sporty sedan, rather than as a sports car - a subtle distinction maybe, but it did provide an accurate description of what the car offered by way of performance and handling. The 528i's injected 2788cc six cylinder SOHC engine was never a sluggard, but its performance allied to some fine suspension tuning transformed the machine fully into the same sports car class as the smaller 323i. More>>
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BMW 2002 Turbo  

BMW 2002 Turbo

1972 - 1973
The BMW turbo was built during 1973, a period that saw skyrocketing fuel prices. Rare and definitely exciting, the BMW 2002 is now one of the most collectable 1970's BMW's. More>>
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BMW E3 3.3 Li Sports Limousine  

BMW E3 3.3 Li Sports Limousine

1974 - 1977
The 3.3L Limousine came at a time when Europe was suffering from rising inflation and rushing towards poverty, while Germany, who had lost the war, was very obviously winning the Industrial battle of the 1970s.The 3.3L Limousine came at a time when Europe was suffering from rising inflation and rushing towards poverty, while Germany, who had lost the war, was very obviously winning the Industrial battle of the 1970s. More>>
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BMW 320 E21  

BMW 320 E21

1975 - 1981
Although the BMW company's reputation was built on its large saloon and sports coupe models, since the 1970's its major source of revenue has been supplied by the company's bread-and-butter family saloons. Typical of these models was the 320 range, introduced during mid 1975. The 3-series model replaced the 1602/2002 series which for many years had proved the mainstay of BMW's production. More>>
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BMW 733i  

BMW 733i

1977 - 1979
The 733i used the well known 3.3-litre straight-six engine which featured a cast-iron cylinder block and aluminium head with virtually hemispherical combustion chambers. This apart, the single-overhead-cam engine was a relatively simple design, but nonetheless it developed a very healthy 197 bhp at 5500 rpm, and 200 lb ft of torque at 4300rpm. More>>
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BMW E21 323i Alpina  

BMW E21 323i C1 Alpina and 328i B6 Alpina

1978- 1983
The Alpina BMW C1 retained the Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system and had a claimed top speed of 208 km/h (129 mph), with acceleration figures of 7.9 sec for 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) and 28.9 sec for a standing start kilometre. More>>
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BMW E28 535i B9 Alpina  

BMW E28 535i B9 Alpina

1978- 1983
The top of the Alpina range in the late 1970's was, as usual, a BMW, based on the then new 5 series. The previous 5 series was the base for cars powered by a 3-litre turbo developing 300 hp and a 330-hp 3.5-litre unit, but the B9 was a normally aspirated 3.5-litre which developed 245 hp. More>>
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BMW M1  

BMW M1

1979 - 1980
The Motorsport 1 (M1) remains the only mid-engined beamer to be developed, and that in itself if enough to make the car truly unique. But more important than any break away from traditional design was the cars fabulous handling and performance. More>>
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BMW 635 CSI  

BMW 635 CSI

1979 - 1989
It may not be the greatest of BMW classics, neither today nor in the future, but the precise handling and sense of involvement lost in the current 8-series make this car very memorable. More>>
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BMW 7 Series E28  

BMW E28 745i Turbo

1980 - 1986
Although announced at the 1979 Frankfurt Show, the 745 Turbo was not launched until the middle of 1980. BMW had taken a little time et their high performance flagship into shape, but its emergence certainly gave a boost (in more ways than one) to the power/prestige race between Munich and Stuttgart. More>>
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BMW Z1

BMW Z1

1989 - 1991
The BMW Z1 was first presented as a concept in 1986, generating such enthusiasm that 5,000 advance orders were placed. BMW rushed the car into full production, and both the prototype and final road going version made clever use of plastic body panels and a flat composite undertray for improved aerodynamics. More>>
Bolwell Road Tests and Reviews
Bolwell Mk IV  

Bolwell Mk IV

1962 - 1964
The Bolwell Mk IV can be considered the first serious commercial model to be released, following the previous "hobby" versions. The Mk IV was manufactured in component form and sold as a kit, meaning the purchaser had to either assemble the car themselves, or pay someone to do it. More >>
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Bolwell Mk V  

Bolwell Mk V

1965
The Bolwell Mk V was produced in 1965, and combined both the latest European developments with the Bolwell brothers own individual ideas of what would make for a superior sports car. More >>
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Bolwell Mk VI  

Bolwell Mk VI

1968
While the Bolwell Mk V was designed for general consumption, the Bolwell brothers' set about designing a race special, the resultant Mk VI (SR6) being a mid-engined masterpiece that was raced very successfully in various Australian sports car events – and is still around today! More >>
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Bolwell Mk VII  

Bolwell Mk VII

1967 - 1972
The Bolwell MK VII marked the start of something big. It was a sleek, fastback coupe that maintained the Holden components theme with more than a hint of Ferrari styling. Like the Lotus Elan, it had a backbone chassis, formed by folded sheet metal. More >>
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Bolwell Mk VIII Nagari  

Bolwell Mk VIII Nagari

1969 - 1972
On Graeme Bolwells return from a working holiday in the UK (with much time spent at Lotus), work soon commenced on the MK VIII. In fact this new model was released in 1969 while the MK VII was still in production! More >>
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Bolwell Mk IX

Bolwell Mk IX Ikara

1979
During the halcyon days of the fifties and sixties, sports cars were less compromising and offered no pretense of sophistication or luxury. Expectations rose during the 1970's (led in many ways by Mercedes seeking to make their expensive sports cars appealing to the Hollywood Boulevard brigade). More>>
Bond Road Tests and Reviews
Bond Equipe 2 Litre GT  

Bond Equipe 2 Litre GT

1967 - 1970
The decision to manufacture a four-wheel car instead of their usual "minicar" variety was born from a desire to find a niche where the company could capitalise on their skill in fibreglass construction. The original prototype design was penned by Lawrie Bond, and featured a particularly handsome fastback rear with small tail fins. More >>
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Bond Bug

Bond Bug

1970 - 1974
Following the take over of Bond in August 1970 Reliant stopped all Bond models but prior to this, they had commissioned Tom Karen of Ogle Design (Ogle being the companies design consultants) to produce a sports 3-wheeler for the "young" generation.  This was to be sold under the Bond name as the  "Bond Bug". More >>
Borgward Road Tests and Reviews
Borgward Isabella

Borgward Isabella

1954 - 1961
The body not only looked ultra new for 1954 it comprised a unit construction body and separate front and rear sub frames, the front one being rubber mounted. The front suspension featured unequal wishbones, coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, checked by an anti roll bar. At the rear was a fully independent swing axle, again featuring coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers. More>>
Bricklin Road Tests and Reviews
Bricklin SV1

Bricklin SV1

1974 - 1976
The Bricklin SV1 was an exceptionally good-looking 2-seat sports car, and was equipped with just about everything imaginable in 1974. There was air-conditioning, AM/FM stereo, power steering and brakes, tinted glass, tilt steering wheel, cast alloy wheels, radial tyres – and because of the stringent US safety laws you could drive it into a wall at 10 mph (forward or backward) without damage. More>>
Bristol Road Tests and Reviews
Bristol 400  

Bristol 400

1946 - 1950
The Bristol 400, a sporting 4-seater saloon, was the car that launched the Bristol marque. It went into full production late in 1946 after being unveiled to the press a few months earlier. More>>
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Bristol 401  

Bristol 401

1948 – 1953
The Bristol 401 2-litre saloon was introduced in 1948 and was the second car produced by the still very new company. The main difference between this car and the earlier 400 was that the body panels were now all aluminium and were fitted to a tubular steel framework that was attached to the steel box section chassis. More>>
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Bristol 402  

Bristol 402

1949 – 1950
Information being compiled. More>>
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Bristol 450  

Bristol 450

1952 – 1955
The terse success story of the Bristol Car Company's three-year campaign in two litre racing was almost unknown outside the small circle of factory personnel and racing enthusiasts who witnessed it, yet it was one that produced the wildly imaginative Bristol 450s. This was due to the tight-lipped policy of the Bristol Aircraft Company's car-making branch. More>>
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Bristol 403  

Bristol 403

1953 – 1955
Information being compiled. More>>
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Bristol 404  

Bristol 404

1953 – 1955
Information being compiled. More>>
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Bristol 405

Bristol 405

1954 – 1958
Information being compiled. More>>

 

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Bristol 405

Bristol 411 Series V

1975 – 1976
IIn the early 1970's, the Bristol 411 was claimed by some to be 'the fastest true 4-seater touring car' made. The series V Bristol 411 represented all that was 'grand' in British grand touring cars. More>>

 

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Bristol 603

Bristol 603 and 603S

1976 – 1982
IThe Bristol 603 was both unique, and exclusive even when in production - and for the enthusiast that is always a very good thing. First and foremost very few were built, production usually ran at around three a week, and the Bristol was without doubt one of the world's most exclusive cars. More>>

 

Bugatti Road Tests and Reviews
Bugatti Type 35  

Bugatti Type 35

1924 - 1931
The Type 35 provided stellar performance, was blessed with an extraordinary chassis and had a wonderful weight distribution perhaps only bettered by later mid-engined vehicles. More>>
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Bugatti Royale  

Bugatti Royale

1932 - 1939
By 1932 Bugatti were already famous for making the best sports cars in the world, however the Royale has become one of the most memorable sports-luxury cars in history! More>>
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Bugatti 57SC Atlantic  

Bugatti 57SC Atlantic

1936 - 1938
How lucky the world was when Ettore Bugatti decided to build and sell passenger cars rather than solely racing cars. How unlucky that after 2 years only 17 were to be constructed. More>>
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Bugatti EB110

Bugatti EB110

1992 - 1994
Bugatti ended its car making shortly after the death of Ettore Bugatti in 1947 - right? Wrong! The legendary name was to grace another fine motor vehicle in 1987 when Italian tycoon Romano Artioli purchased the Bugatti marque and built a modernised factory in Modena - home to other great marques such as Ferrari, Lamborghini, Maserati and De Tomaso. More>>
Buick Road Tests and Reviews
Buick Centurion  

Buick Centurion

1956
Buick's new "dream" car for 1956 is the Centurion, a racy four-passenger, two-door coupe with an all-glass top. Made of fibreglass, the Centurion incorporates many innovations in styling and engineering. It is mounted on a 118 inch wheelbase and is powered by a 325 horsepower V-8 engine. More>>
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Buick Riviera  

Buick Skylark

1961 - 1963
In the early 1960s more and more Americans were following the then current trend of ordering their cars with sports options - bucket seats, convertible tops, and four-speed floor shifts. Most of these items were being ordered on compact cars, not standard-sized ones. One of the more popular compacts was the Buick Special, and in the early 1960s the Special was the second-best seller in the Buick line-up. More>>
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Buick Riviera  

Buick Riviera

1963 - 1965
Blessed with some of the finest styling to come out of Detroit it was restrained yet swoopy and exuded presence where cars like the Cadillac and Imperial were seen as merely big. More>>
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Buick California GS  

Buick California GS

1967 - 1969
The California GS was Buick's attempt to create a lower cost and smaller muscle car. Fitted with the small block GS drivetrain, the exterior received the full treatment including vinyl top, chrome moulding package, GS emblems, and special California scripts. More>>
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1968 Buick GS 400  

Buick GS 350 and 400

1968
Buick's Gran Sport didn’t catch the American public's eye - and car-buying dollars - as well as its competitors'. By 1968 it was fighting for 4th place in the intermediate super arena with Ford's Fairlane. And that in itself told a story...firstly that the Fairlane wasn't higher on the charts, and the fact that Buick was able to maintain a sales figure equal to a Ford product. More>>
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Buick Riviera Boat Tail  

Buick Riviera Boat Tail

1971 - 1973
Although controversial when released, successive Riviera's became smaller, uglier and far more conventional, ending the allure but ensuring this model would forever be remembered as a true classic. More>>
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Buick Regal Grand National

Buick Regal Grand National

1982 - 1987
While the Buick T-Type Regal coupes were aimed at the performance market, 1982's Regal Grand National signalled a change for the better. Named for the NASCAR Grand National racing series, this car incorporated a 4.1 litre V6 with 125 hp, or an optional 180 hp turbocharged 3.8 V6. It also featured T-tops, front and rear spoilers and a striking gray over silver paint job. More>>
Buick LeSabre Road Tests and Reviews
Buick LeSabre Gen1  

Buick LeSabre Generation 1

1959 - 1960
LeSabre and all other 1959 Buicks not only got new names, but all-new styling as well, adopting the new GM B- and C-body used on all of the corporation's full-sized cars - the larger C-body used in the Electra as well as the Oldsmobile 98 and all Cadillacs was basically a stretched out B-body rather than a distinct body and chassis. More>>
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Buick LeSabre Generation 2  

Buick LeSabre Generation 2

1961 - 1964
LeSabre and all other full-sized Buicks (joined by the compact Special this year) were completely restyled for 1961 featuring finless rear ends, more restrained use of chrome, and boxier sheetmetal. Wheelbases remained at 123 inches (3,100 mm) but the new cars were slightly downsized in both length and width, and rode on a new X-frame chassis which included a conventional rear axle and driveshaft replacing the decades-old torque tube design. More>>
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Buick LeSabre Generation 3  

Buick LeSabre Generation 3

1965 - 1970
LeSabre and other full-sized Buicks were completely restyled for the 1965 model year, featuring more rounded bodylines and Coke-bottle profiles with semi-fastback rooflines on two-door hardtop coupes. Wheelbases remained at 123 inches (3,100 mm), but a new perimeter frame shared with other GM B-body cars replaced the "X" frame used since 1961. Body styles were unchanged from 1964. More>>
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Buick LeSabre Generation 4  

Buick LeSabre Generation 4

1971 - 1976
Like the other GM divisions, Buick completely restyled its B- and C-body cars for 1971. The full-size cars emerged larger and heavier than before and also ever after. The styling featured curved bodysides, long hoods and wide expanses of glass, similar to that of Chrysler Corporation's 1969 full-sized cars, but with a lower beltline than the Chrysler products. Semi-fastback rooflines were utilized on two-door hardtop coupes. More>>
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Buick LeSabre Generation 5  

Buick LeSabre Generation 5

1977 - 1985
Like the other GM divisions, Buick completely restyled its B- and C-body cars for 1971. The full-size cars emerged larger and heavier than before and also ever after. The styling featured curved bodysides, long hoods and wide expanses of glass, similar to that of Chrysler Corporation's 1969 full-sized cars, but with a lower beltline than the Chrysler products. Semi-fastback rooflines were utilized on two-door hardtop coupes. More>>
Cadillac Road Tests and Reviews
Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generarion 1

1953 - 1954
The first iteration of the El Dorado was a low volume convertible only model, available in four unique colors - Aztec Red, Alpine White, Azure Blue and Artisan Ochre. Convertible tops were available in either black or white Orlon. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 2

1955 - 1958
For 1955, the Eldorado's body gained its own rear end styling with high, slender, pointed tailfins. These contrasted with the rather thick, bulbous fins which were common at the time and were an example of Eldorado once again pointing the way forward. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

1957 - 1958
It was curvy with pillarless doors and knife-edged fins with a 90 degree wraparound on the front screen. Its roof was built from stainless steel and with its narrow white sidewalls and twin headlights it was seen as an industry first. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 3

1959 - 1966
A different Eldorado Brougham was sold for 1959 and 1960. These cars were not quite so extravagantly styled but were very unusual pieces in themselves. Priced at $13,075, they cost $1 more, each, than their older siblings. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 4

1967 - 1970
The Eldorado was radically redesigned for 1967. Intended for the burgeoning personal luxury car market, it was a "personal" Cadillac sharing the E-body with the Buick Riviera and Oldsmobile Toronado that had been introduced the previous year. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 5

1971 - 1978
When GM's full-size cars were redesigned for 1971, the Eldorado regained both a convertible model and its fender skirts. The 126.3-inch (3,210 mm) wheelbase version of the Eldorado would run through 1978, receiving facelifts in 1973 and 1975. More>>
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Cadillac Seville S2  

Cadillac Seville S2

1975 - 1979
For most, driving simply means around town or down a long and straight highway. When it was rare to find yourself on the twisty stuff, the Seville's suspension, by front wishbones and anti-roll bar, with semi-elliptic springs at the rear, was near perfect. Similarly there was little need for particularly precise steering, and this was an area in which the Seville's recirculating ball system revealed its typically American origins. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 6

1979 - 1985
For 1979, a new, trimmer Eldorado was introduced, and for the first time the car shared its chassis with the Buick Riviera as well as the Toronado. Smaller 350 and 368 in³ (5.7 and 6.0 litre) V8's replaced the 500 and 425 in³ (8.2 and 7.0 litre) of the preceding model, giving better fuel efficiency. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham  

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 7

1986 - 1991
For 1986, yet another downsizing occurred, and it was fairly extreme. In fact, the costly Eldorado was now the same size that GM's own compact cars had been only a few years earlier, and much smaller than Lincoln's competing Mark VII. More>>
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Cadillac Eldorado Brougham

Cadillac Eldorado Generation 8

1992 - 2002
For 1992, a new Eldorado appeared. It was in fact only slightly bigger than its predecessor, but it was so much more adroitly styled that it seemed greatly so. Window glass was once again frameless, and shortly after introduction Cadillac's new Northstar V8 became available in both 270 and 295 hp variants, replacing the 200 hp 4.9 litre. More>>
Checker Road Tests and Reviews
Checker Marathon

Checker Marathon

1956 - 1982
For those not born in the US, the classic looks of the New York cab do not give any hint as to the manufacturer of the vehicle. Rugged and reliable, it was in fact manufactured by Checker and was even available as a passenger car from 1960 to 1982. More>>

 

Chevrolet Road Tests and Reviews
Chev Bel Air  

Chevrolet Bel Air


1954 - 1957
The 1950's are synonymous with young Americans enjoying rock 'n' roll, drive-in movies and cars that were fast and affordable. The Chevrolet Bel Air became one of the most popular American cars ever because of its unique style, engine modifications and affordable price. More >>
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Chev Corvair  

Chevrolet Corvair


1959 - 1969
Controversy surrounded early Corvairs culminating in Ralph Nader to publish a book entitled "Unsafe at any Speed" which resulted in a change in government regulations and safety that continues even today. More>>
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Chev El Camino  

Chevrolet El Camino


1959 - 1973
Many consider it unfair that the El Camino is so readily associated with ethnic and class stereotypes. Australia may be the birth place of the utility, but for the US market it was the Ford Ranchero and Chevy El Camino that introduced the notion of a vehicle offering car like comfort combined with truck like carrying capabilities. More >>
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Chevrolet Corvair Yenko Stinger  

Chevrolet Corvair Yenko Stinger


1966 - 1969
In 1966, Don Yenko was impressed enough with the late model Chevrolet Corvair's handling, and decided to apply for SCCA approval of the Corsa model for racing. The sanctioning body approved the cars with back seat removed and upgrades to the Corsa engine increasing horsepower and torque. More >>
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Chev Camaro  

Chevrolet Camaro


1967 - 1969
The Ford Mustang can be credited with forcing other US car manufacturers to design and manufacture cars with personality and design flair. The AMC Javelin, Plymouth Barracuda and the now infamous Chevy Camaro were all created in response to the incredible popularity of the Mustang! More>>
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Chev Camaro Z-28  

Chevrolet Camaro Z-28


1967 - 1969
Today, even the most ill-informed know the Z-28 designation referred to an engine option, a 302.4 cu. in., 290-hp V8, the heart of a sedan racing package. The option added US$437.10 to the Camaro's $2572.00 base price, but additional mandatory options, such as power disc brakes (front) and a four-speed close-ratio Muncie transmission, brought the sticker price up to a minimum of $3314.60. More>>
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Chev Monte Carlo  

Chevrolet Monte Carlo


1970 - 1972
Equipped with all the creature comforts possible at the time, and finished with a Walnut dashboard to enhance its classy image, the car was most at home when cruising the highways. More>>
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Chev Monte Carlo  

Chevrolet Vega


1971 - 1977
The Chevrolet Vega, which was first introduced in 1971, marked a new direction for Chevrolet towards a sub-compact market previously dominated by European imports, and which also included such other American products as the Ford Pinto and the American Motors Pacer. More>>
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Chevrolet Chevette  

Chevrolet Chevette


1975 - 1987
EIn the decade leading up to the release of the Chevette, design proposals for small cars were regularly rejected. The 1976 Chevette was then the smallest and lightest car ever made in the US under the Chevrolet name. The only car built under the Chevrolet aegis that was smaller was the “Little Four” of 1912 and 1913, which was shorter in wheelbase and lighter in weight. More>>
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Chev Citation

Chevrolet Citation


1980 - 1985
In order to contain the threat General Motors invested the unprecedented sum of 2.7 billion dollars in their 'X-Car' project. It was rated a worthwhile investment as it was estimated the new-generation cars would ultimately represent 60 per cent of the US market. More>>

 

Chevrolet Chevelle Road Tests and Reviews
Chev Chevelle Generation 1  

Chev Chevelle Generation 1

1964 - 1967
The Chevelle was intended to compete with the Ford Fairlane, and to return to the Chevrolet lineup a model similar in size and concept to the popular 1955 - 1957 models. Enthusiasts were quick to notice that the Chevelle’s 115-inch (2,900 mm) wheelbase was the same as that of the 1955 - 1957 Chevy. Two-door hardtop coupes, and convertibles, four-door sedans, and four-door station wagons were offered throughout the entire run. More >>
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Chev Chevelle SS396  

Chev Chevelle SS396

1964 - 1967
The Chevelle SS396 became a series of its own in 1966 with series/style numbers 13817 and 13867. SS396 sport coupes and convertibles used the same Malibu sport coupe and convertible bodies with reinforced frames and revised front suspension: higher-rate springs, recalibrated shocks, and thicker front stabilizer bar, but with different exterior trim. They also had simulated hood scoops, red-stripe tires, and bright trim moldings. More >>
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Chev Chevelle Generation 2  

Chev Chevelle Generation 2

1968 - 1972
The 1968 Chevelle got an all-new distinctly sculpted body with tapered front fenders and a rounded beltline. The car adopted a long-hood/short-deck profile with a high rear-quarter "kick-up". While all 1967 Chevelle models rode a 115-inch (2,900 mm) wheelbase, the 1968 coupes and convertibles now rode a sporty 112-inch (2,800 mm) wheelbase. The sedans and wagons turned to a 116-inch (2,900 mm) span. More>>
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1976 Chevelle  

Chev Chevelle Generation 3

1973- 1977
The most extensive redesign in its 10-year history marked the 1973 Chevelle, and with it marked the end of hardtops as we knew them. The newly-named "Colonnade Hardtop" featured a semi-fastback roofline, frameless door glass and fixed, styled "B" pillars, structurally strong enough to contribute to occupant safety of a roll-over type accident. GM had anticipated Federal roll-over safety standards that ironically didn't materialize. More >>
Chevrolet Corvette Road Tests and Reviews
1953 Chev Corvette C1  

Chevrolet Corvette C1 53/54

1953 - 1954
Sports car sales got off to a shakey start in the US after World War 2. Understandably, many had postponed family plans, and so the resultant baby-boom made the family car a top seller, and the sports car remained a mere whimsy for the wealthy. More >>
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1955 Chev Corvette C1  

Chevrolet Corvette C1 Update 55/57

1955 - 1957
By the end of 1956 only 3,467 Corvette's had been manufactured, in comparison with over 15,000 Ford Thunderbirds. But the direction of the Thunderbird was about to change, the decision to make it a "personal car", somewhere between a sports car and a family car, would make it easier for the Corvette to wrest the mantle of being America's favourite sports car. More >>
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1958 Chev Corvette C1  

Chevrolet Corvette C1 Update 58/61

1958 - 1962
The 1958 Corvette saw another body freshening. This year had the most exterior chrome of the C-1 generation. From its quad headlights and hood louvers to its twin trunk spars and bumper exiting exhaust, it was the flashiest Corvette built. 1959-60 saw little changes except decreasing chrome and increasing HP. More >>
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Chev Corvette C2  

Chevrolet Corvette C2

1963 - 1967
The second generation, or mid-year Corvette was designed by Larry Shinoda with major inspiration from a previous un-produced design called the "Q Corvette" by Peter Brock and Chuck Pohlmann, under the styling direction of Bill Mitchell. The design had several inspirations. The first was the contemporary Jaguar E-Type, one of which Bill Mitchell owned and enjoyed driving frequently. Mitchell also sponsored a car known as the "Mitchell Sting Ray" in 1959, because Chevrolet no longer participated in factory racing. More >>
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Chev Stingray

Chevrolet Corvette C3

1968 - 1982
The third generation Corvette was patterned after the "Mako Shark II" concept car. The C3 was introduced for the 1968 model year and lasted through 1982, and at 15 years was the longest running Corvette generation. It came out on top of the performance era of the 60's, sold in record numbers through the EPA rules and gas crunch of the 70's, and stood its ground against its competition into the early 80's. More>>
Chevrolet Impala Road Tests and Reviews
Chevrolet Impala Generation Generation 1

Chevrolet Impala Generation 1

1958
The Impala was introduced in 1958 and was positioned as a top of the line Bel Air in either coupe or convertible. From the windshield pillar rearward, the 1958 Chevrolet Bel Air Impala differed structurally from typical Chevrolets. Hardtops had a slightly shorter greenhouse and longer rear deck, giving the impression of an extended body. More>>
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Chevrolet Impala Generation 2  

Chevrolet Impala Generation 2

1959 - 1960
The 1959 Chevrolet Impala was radically reworked sharing bodyshells with lower-end Buicks and Oldsmobiles as well as with Pontiac, part of a GM economy move, Chevrolets rode a wheelbase 11/2 inches longer than before. Atop a new X-frame chassis, roofs sat three inches lower, and bodies measured more than two inches wider overall. The growing size contributed to increased curb weight, one more trend of the times. More>>
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Chevrolet Impala Generation 3  

Chevrolet Impala Generation 3

1961 - 1964
In the US the Impala was the top car in the Chevrolet range. It was available as a four-door sedan and sport sedan, a sport coupe and convertible (both available with Super Sport equipment like bucket seats, heavy-duty coils, floor shift, and six and nine-passenger station wagons. More>>
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Chev Impala SS  

Chevrolet Impala SS

1961 - 1964
Most noticeable on the 61 Impala was the lack of tail fins, however the options fitted to the SS and the enormous size of the 6704cc V8 were what really put the car ahead of its time. More>>
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Chevrolet Impala Generation 4  

Chevrolet Impala Generation 4

1965 - 1970
Totally redesigned in 1965, the Impala set an all-time industry annual sales record of more than 1 million units in the U.S., which has never been bettered. All new full-size Chevys eschewed the "X" frame for a full-width perimeter frame, a new body which featured curved, frameless side glass (for pillarless models), sharper angled windshield with newly reshaped vent windows, and redesigned full-coil suspension. More>>
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Chevrolet Impala Generation 5  

Chevrolet Impala Generation 5

1971 - 1976
The Impala remained Chevrolet's top-selling model with the fifth generation. A high-performance big block V8 was still available in the form of the Turbo-Jet 454, which produced 365 hp in 1971, but power decreased as the years went along. The 1971 redesigned B-body would be the largest car ever offered by Chevrolet. The hardtop Sport Coupe continued to be offered; it was a smoothly sloped semi-fastback reminiscent of the 1961 "bubbletop" styling. More>>
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Chevrolet Impala Generation 3  

Chevrolet Impala Generation 6

1977 - 1985
IThe changes in the automobile marketplace resulted in Chevrolet redesigning the Impala once again in 1977 to meet changing demands. The new downsized Impalas were shorter in length, taller and narrower than before. The new Impala's frame was a shortened version of the one introduced in 1971 and would be utilized until 1996 when the B-body production line was shut down. More>>
Chrysler Road Tests and Reviews
Chrysler Six  

Chrysler Six

1924 - 1931
Walter P. Chrysler wanted the Chrysler Six to be a light vehicle, seat five passengers, and be economical to own and operate. He wanted it to be a model of durability and performance. More>>
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Chrysler Airflow  

Chrysler Airflow

1934 - 1937
Their engineers found that then-current two-box automobile design was so aerodynamically inefficient, that it was actually more efficient turned around backwards. More>>
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Chrysler Airstream  

Chrysler Airstream

1935 - 1937
While the Chrysler Airflow marked a radical departure from typical 1930’s designs, the Airstream represented a mild makeover of the 1933 “CO” amd 1934 “CA” models, albeit with a more flowing and streamlined design – something to ensure Chrysler dealerships throughout the USA literally had “something for everyone”. More>>
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Chrysler Ghia L6.4  

Chrysler Ghia L6.4

1960 - 1962
Perhaps the most collectable Chrysler in the world, the Ghia L6.4 has all the trademarks of a truely desirable classic automobile. More>>
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Chrysler New Yorker Gen 5  

Chrysler New Yorker Gen 5

1960 - 1964
The New Yorker was the flagship of the Chrysler range. As such, there were not too many things you needed to worry about. Once you had chosen the colour and upholstery fabric you were pretty much done. Everything else - and we do mean everything - was standard equipment. More>>
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Chrysler Gas Turbine  

Chrysler Gas Turbine

1963
Several car manufacturers experimented with the idea of developing a Gas Turbine car, but none got nearer to developing a fully blown production model than Chrysler. More>>
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Chrysler 300-L  

Chrysler 300-L

1965
The Chrysler 300-L was the last of the 300 letter cars - all of which are extremely collectable today. It was available as a two-door hardtop or as a convertible, and was the 11th in a series of performance cars which dated back to the mid 1950s – with Chrysler being the undisputed pioneers in the performance car category. More>>
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Chrysler Cordoba

Chrysler Cordoba

1975 - 1983
The Chrysler Cordoba first appeared in 1975, a twin of the detuned, depowered Dodge Charger. Amusingly, it was originally meant to be a Plymouth, rather than a Chrysler; that was a last-minute change. The Cordoba was a B-body, one step in size above the entry-level Valiant A-body, but below the C and D bodies that usually wore the Chrysler badge. More>>
Chrysler Australia Valiant Road Tests and Reviews
Chrysler Royal   

Chrysler Royal

1957 - 1964
The Royal was always a style-leader, but unfortunately was well beyond the price range of the majority of new-car buyers, and as such was overlooked by many when searching for their next new car. That makes them very rare, and highly collectable. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant R Series  

Chrysler Valiant "R" Series

1962 - 1962
Understanding the R series Valiant requires taking a look back in time so that the car can be put into perspective. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant "S" Series  

Chrysler Valiant "S" Series

1962 - 1963
The Valiant "S" series, or SV-1, was an evolution of the R Series, it continuing the theme of a US design being locally assembled. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant AP5  

Chrysler Valiant AP5

1963 - 1965
It was in 1963, with the introduction of the AP5, that Chrysler Australia began manufacturing Valiant’s rather than just assembling them. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant AP6  

Chrysler Valiant AP6

1965 - 1966
The Valiant AP6 was an evolution of the AP5, having a facelifted split grille and introducing to the range the V8 engined Valiant "Regal", along with the “Wayfarer” utility. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VC  

Chrysler Valiant VC

1965 - 1966
The release of the VC Valiant heralded the true beginning of the “Battle of the Big Three”. The Chrysler stylists had been busy creating a car that looked longer, lower and sleeker than any previous model, even though it was basically only a facelift of the previous AP5/AP6 design. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VE  

Chrysler Valiant VE

1967 - 1969
The Valiant VE was an all new design, the bodywork sharing some sheet-metal with the US Plymouth Valiant and Dodge Dart; despite the US content the VE was unquestionably the most Australian Valiant to date. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VF  

Chrysler Valiant VF

1969 - 1970
For our money, the face-lifted VF ushered in a new elegance and style lacking in so much of the competition, and with the introduction of the “Pacer” Chrysler clearly indicated the new found good looks would be matched by equally impressive performance. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VF Hardtop  

Chrysler Valiant VF Hardtop

1969 - 1970
Based on the Stateside Dodge Dart, the two door utilised VF front panels but from the bulkhead back was strictly imported metal. Chrysler began with the importation of Dart panels – although they were intending to switch to local pressing if production volume had warranted it. The profile was distinctly American Dodge with a very slight hipline kicking up just to the rear of the door. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VG  

Chrysler Valiant VG

1970 - 1973
Differentiating the VF over its predecessor is a little like playing a “spot the difference” test in a weekly magazine. Externally there were very few differences, apart from the now rectangular front lights, while the interior remained almost identical in every way. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VH  

Chrysler Valiant VH

1971 - 1973
There was a collective sigh from Valiant aficionados in 1971 with the release of the all-new VH, particularly with those salivating for new Chrysler sheet metal. More>>
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Chrysler by Chrysler CH Hardtop  

Chrysler by Chrysler CH

1971 - 1973
The Chrysler by Chrysler CH model was released in November 1971 in both two and four door models. Released as a replacement to the ever popular VIP model, the Chrysler CH moved even further up the luxury ladder, and was often described as a “limousine”. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VJ  

Chrysler Valiant VJ

1973 - 1975
By the time of the release of the VJ Valiant, Chrysler’s market share was in its fourth consecutive year of decline. More>>
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Chrysler by Chrysler CJ  

Chrysler by Chrysler CJ

1973 - 1975
By 1973 the CJ version the Chrysler by Chrysler lowered its social status - and its price - a little by shedding some of its luxury trappings and moving down into the realms of its less lavishly-equipped competition. Judged in its own right, however, the Chrysler was a pretty fair match for its main opposition, the Fairlane and GMH's Statesman. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant Galant  

Chrysler Valiant Galant

1973 - 1976
The Valiant Galant was fitted with the gutsy, noisy 1600cc Saturn unit which Mitsubishi claimed produced 100 bhp at 6300 rpm. The engine was an interesting mixture of both modern and traditional features. For the time, it featured what many considered to be a sophisticated breathing system - single overhead cam, cross flow head, hemispherical combustion chambers, twin choke carburettor and smooth-l-branch exhaust manifold. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VK/CK  

Chrysler Valiant VK/CK

1975 - 1976
The VK Valiant was yet another mild makeover of the previous VH and VJ models. The obligatory new grille design combined with a revised tail light assembly made up the more obvious of only a handful of changes, leaving many to ask why Chrysler had indeed bothered. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant CL  

Chrysler Valiant CL

1976 - 1978
The CL Valiant was supposed to be something special. Chrysler had been touting the fact that the all new Valiant VL would be an Australianised edition of the Plymouth Volare / Dodge Aspen intermediate sized car proving to be very popular in the US. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant CL  

Chrysler Valiant CL Panel Van, Drifter and LeBaron

1976 - 1978
The model range of the CL was certainly nowhere near the heady days of the VH series, when 56 different model variants were available. The development then of an entirely new model seemed at odds with the conservative approach being taken by Chrysler. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant CM

Chrysler Valiant CM

1978 - 1981
The last re-styling and packaging of the 1971 VH design was to be seen in the CM Series Valiant – unfortunately this would also be the last of the prestigious lineage of Valiant’s that had graced our shores since 1962’s introduction of the “R” series. More>>
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Chrysler Centura  

Chrysler Centura

1975 - 1977
Based on the French "Simca", the Centura was considered by many to be too little too late, being released in 1975, some 8 years after the Torana and TC Cortina had made inroads and established their market share. More>>
Chrysler Australia Valiant Pacer and Charger Road Tests and Reviews
Chrysler Valiant VG Pacer  

Chrysler Valiant VF Pacer 225

1969 - 1970
Some indication of the Pacer's accelerative ability can be taken from the fact that a Falcon GT from that era recorded 0-60 times in the high eight seconds bracket, while the Pacer could manage around 9.1 seconds – so while it may not have beaten the V8 monster in a straight line, it would loom large in the rear view mirror. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VG Pacer  

Chrysler Valiant VG Pacer

1970 - 1973
The VG Pacer had a higher performance 265, and it set a record for being the fastest mass-produced four-door six cylinder sedan produced in Australia (the record was undisputed until 1988). The relatively inexpensive Pacer's 265 had 218 hp, leading to a 15.9 second quarter mile, 8 second 0-100 km/h, and top speed of 185 km/h - all with a 3 speed transmission! More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VH Charger

Chrysler Valiant VH Charger

1970 - 1973
A new star rose on the Australian motoring scene in 1971, with the arrival in the VH Valiant range of the short wheelbase, fastback Charger. Chrysler's TV campaign featured the young adults at whom it was targeted, waving at one as it swept by them and shouting "Hey, Charger!" - one of the more memorable TV ads of the time, it created a cliché that haunts today's owners. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VH Charger E38

Chrysler Valiant VH Charger E38

1971 - 1973
What was so good about the E38? Up front it was all VH Valiant, which helped to keep the costs down. The rear end treatment was an entirely different story, but it was not extrordinary nor revolutionary. The E38 ran on a 105-inch-wheelbase, and apart from the highly developed Hemi, the Charger featured power disc brakes up front and drums at the rear, twin fuel fillers and 16.0:1 steering. That was it, basically. More>>
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Chrysler Valiant VJ

Chrysler Valiant VJ Charger

1973 - 1975
Despite the withdrawal from touring car racing, the Charger range had proved to be one of the most successful marketing moves ever made by Chrysler. The car was a breakaway from the established principle that coupe derivations of four door sedans should be priced into a slightly more exclusive market. Charger models were, in fact, about $100 cheaper than the nearest sedan equivalents. More>>
Chrysler UK and Europe Road Tests and Reviews
Chrysler 180  

Chrysler 180

1970 - 1982
The Chrysler 180 remained very French, despite its all-American name. It was fitted with a then new 1812cc single-overhead cam engine which, along with the four-door body, was built in France but designed by Roy Axe and Curt Gwinn in England. The design of the 180 was originally to wear the Humber badge, but that changed when the Humber brand was put out to pasture. More>>
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Chrysler Sunbeam  

Chrysler Sunbeam

1975 - 1980
There were serious problems with the British motor industry during the reign of the Chrysler Sunbeam. We have already written (arguably too much) on this subject, and besides, we really do like so much of British sheet metal. So writing this review will test our mettle, can we get to the end without bemoaning everthing that went pear shaped during the 1970's? More>>
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Chrysler Alpine  

Chrysler Alpine

1975 - 1980
The Alpine - also called the Simca 1307/1308/1309 (depending on the mechanical specification) in France and other European countries - was a classic front-drive, medium-sized, five-door hatchback family saloon. More than just a well-planned and versatile model, it was hoped that it would be so good, it would ultimately be the saviour of Chrysler UK Ltd. In 1976 the company was in a desperate commercial and financial crisis, with a range of ageing models, falling demand, and nothing coming along to retrieve the situation. More>>
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Chrysler Avenger

Chrysler Avenger

1976 - 1979
In 1976 Chrysler decided to market the Avenger under it’s own name, and at the same time gave the car a comprehensive makeover. The new frontal treatment featured squared off headlights, while at the rear the distinctive “hockey stick” style tail lights were dropped in favour of more conventional units. More>>
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Chrysler Horizon

Chrysler Horizon

1977 - 1986
It was a little ironic that Chrysler felt they needed to unload their European operation, consisting of Chrysler UK, and Simca in France, to Peugeot in 1978 before the Horizon came on the market. The Horizon was the car intended to revive and strengthen the American subsidiary, and sales figures were excellent from the word go, and Europe's motoring writers chose the Horizon as their car of the year in 1978. More>>
Cistalia Road Tests and Reviews
Cistalia 202 SC

Cisitalia 202 SC

1947 - 1952
Any car design that obtains the honour of being displayed at the New York Musuem of Modern Art is surely the penultimate in collectable cars. More>>
Citroen Road Tests and Reviews
Citroen Traction Avant  

Citroen Traction Avant

1934 - 1957
Made between 1934 - 1957, the Traction Avant established Citroen's reputation as a technology leader. It had monocoque chassis, front-wheel drive, over-head valve engine and torsion bar suspension. More>>
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Citroen 2CV  

Citroen 2CV

1948 - 1990
From 1948 to 1990, nearly 4 million 2CVs rolled out of the Citroen factory, placing on the top of Citroen's own all-time best selling chart. Globally, its 42 year life span places it in second place just behind the VW Beetle. More>>
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Citroen DS  

Citroen DS

1955 - 1975
Seen as one of the most innovative cars of its era, the Citroen DS engineers introduced self-levelling suspension with hydraulic hydropneumatic struts and unique adjustable ride-height facility allowing the DS to raise itself over rough terrain. More>>
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Citroen ID19  

Citroen ID19

1956 - 1975
On the road the ID was 5 mph slower than the DS, but it would sprint from 0 to 60 in 17.6 seconds against the DS's 19 seconds. It was more sparing on fuel, too: 31.3 mpg compared to 28.8. The ID's conventional gear-change and clutch set-up was a touch faster and much more precise than the DS's hydraulically "cushioned" arrangement. More>>
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Citroen Ami 6 and 8  

Citroen Ami 6 and 8

1961 - 1978
Mechanically the Citroen Ami-6’s design was derived from that of the 2CV but it was more powerful and had a much more luxurious body. Its 602cc engine gave a maximum speed of 65 mph. At launch, in France it cost 6550 francs. This was about 13 percent more than the cheapest three-speed Dauphine, which had a higher performance. More>>
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Citroen Dyane  

Citroen Dyane

1967 - 1983
Released in September 1967 and looking a little less corrugated than the timeless 2CV, the Dyane used the same 425cc engine and was aimed as an "intermediate" model, sitting between the 2CV and Ami Six belt. Later versions gained a choice between the new 435 and 602 cc engines, the latter engine featuring higher compression pistons and forced induction from the engine fan. More>>
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Citroen SM  

Citroen SM

1970 - 1975
This prestige SM was created in 1970, and used a smaller V6 version of Maserti's quad-cam V8 motor, combined with Citroen's already well developed front wheel drive that had its gearbox/transaxle unit slung ahead of the compact engine. Now, at last, a performance Citroen. More>>
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Citroen Ami Super  

Citroen Ami Super

1973 - 1976
The Ami Super was a flat-4 variant of the original Ami, powered by the engine of the GS and produced between 1973 and 1976. At the launch of the GS, its original flat 4 cylinder air-cooled 1015cc 55 bhp DIN engine was considered to be under powered. With surplus engines available, Citroen decided to fit the engine into the Ami 8 in January 1973. More>>
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Citröen GS 1220 Club  

Citroen GS 1220 Club

1973 - 1979
The Citroen GS 1220 possessed that quality of ugliness which only the chic French could make admirable. The controversial shape packed in the maximum passenger and luggage space within a minimum road space. More>>
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Citröen CX 2200  

Citroen CX 2000 and CX 2200

1974 - 1979
The immediate impression created by the CX was that it was a clever styling mixture of GS and SM, a recommendation in itself. Technically too it was an amalgam of everything that was advanced in the then current Citroen models, wrapped in a most elegant, ultra-modern body. More>>
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Citröen CX 2400 Pallas  

Citroen CX 2400 Pallas

1976 - 1983
First released in Australia in 1976 in 2.2 litre form, by 1981 the CX 2400 would be the only model Citroen would offer in Australia. The car was actually first released in Europe in 1974, then replacing the long standing D series that had been in continuous production for more than twenty years. More>>
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Citroen Visa Club  

Citroen Visa Club

1978 - 1987
The Visa Club's neat four door body had a distinctive thermoplastic nose section with the traditional loftiness of its forebears, while wheel-arch gaps suggested that this Citroen had all the suspension travel expected of the breed. Certainly, a great deal of attention was paid to the creature comforts of the driver and passengers. More>>
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Citröen CX 2400 Pallas  

Citroen Mehari 4 x 4

1979 - 1982
Citroen's useful and amusing plastic-bodied, 2CV-engined Mehari (Camel) became an even more useful vehicle when it was endowed with four-wheel-drive in 1979. The ageless air-cooled twin-cylinder baxermator (602 cc, 29 bhp/21.62 kW) was attached to a gearbox with drive-shaft to the rear wheels, and hey presto, the 4WD Mehari was created. More>>
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Citröen BX

Citroen BX

1983 - 1994
The Citroen BX is important to remember as being the very first new car from the PSA group. It showed a sense of co-operation between Peugeot and Citroen without losing the individuality of the Citroen marque. The basic floorpan of the BX served as a foundation for other cars from the group, and had a 104.5-inch wheelbase and the well known hydropneumatic suspension system. More>>
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Citroen ZX

Citroen ZX

1990 - 1998
The Citroen ZX was arguably the most conventional major model in the company's history. There was no hydropneumatic suspension - it was considered too expensive. There was no futuristic body style - such an idea was considered too avant garde for what Citroen's Peugeot masters claimed was a conservative market. There wasn't even the single-spoke wheel, which had been a long-time Citroen trademark. More>>
Clan Road Tests and Reviews
Clan Crusader

Clan Crusader

1937 - 1938
The Clan was the brainchild of Paul Haussauer. With an Oxford engineering degree, involving a 5-year apprenticeship with General Electric, and a brief spell in a plastics firm under his belt, he joined Lotus in 1965 to learn about the specialised car industry. As Assistant Projects Engineer he worked on the Elan S3 and S4 as well as the Elite, but he felt that there was still space at the bottom end of the two-seater sports GT market. More>>
Cord Road Tests and Reviews
Cord 810/812

Cord 810/812

1937 - 1938
The last of the Cords was also the last of the American front wheel drivers for some 30 years, until the Oldsmobile Toronado was released. Already known for making front wheel drive vehicles, this Cord was no different however instead of using a straight 8 it was powered by a side valve V8. The car featured retracting headlights and wrap around grille that sat below a long sleek hood. More>>
Crosley Road Tests and Reviews
Crosley  

Crosley

1939 - 1942
Perhaps one of the strangest vehicles to come out of the US of A was the Crosley, a sub compact car that began life in 1939 and survived until 1952. What was so unique about the Crosley was its humble design, based very much on the small sub-compact cars from Europe, and built in a country where the traditional sedans bonet was longer than this little car. More>>
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Crosley "Roundside"

Crosley "Roundside"

1946 - 1952
After WWII the 1946 model Crosleys were introduced. Known as the "Roundside", Crosley modified the body work by creating a more square and modern look. But the biggest improvement to the little car was the implementation of an overhead cam 4 cylinder engine. While the prices went up marginally, the Crosley remained America's cheapest car, and in some respects became a leader in innovation. More>>

 

DAF Road Tests and Reviews
DAF 44  

DAF 44

1966 - 1974
The DAF44 made its debut in 1966, and featured an attractive and larger body to previous iterations. The design was penned by Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti, who was able to take the utalitarian and make it rather more pleasing to the eye. More>>
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DAF 33  

DAF 33

1967 - 1974
The DAF33 made its debut a year after the 44, effectively replacing the Daffodil when the company decided to drop the flowery name altogther. DAF then had two distinct bodies from which to chose, the "A" body as used for the 33, and the "B" body as used for the 44. More>>
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DAF 55

DAF 55

1967 - 1972
DAF entered two 55´s in the 1968 London-Sydney Marathon, and despite plenty of cars that were not able to complete the arduous trek the two little DAF's accounted for themselves very well, finishing in position 17 and 57. More>>
Daihatsu Road Tests and Reviews
Daihatsu F20  

Daihatsu F20

1979 - 1985
On bush tracks the Daihatsu really shined, the relatively large engine size (in comparison to body size) allowing the performance to be leisurely, and unlike the Suzuki, not requiring the driver to continually change cogs to get the best out of it. The achilles heel when off-road was found with the standard dampers, they fading rapidly on corrugated and hard-packed ripple surfaces, giving the car a pitch and bounce ride. Many owners chose to replace these dampers with good quality after market units – a strategy that quickly solved the problem. More>>
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Daihatsu Charade  

Daihatsu Charade

1981 -
The diminutive Charade was the star performer among petrol-engined vehicles in the 1980 Australian Total Oil Economy Run, achieving a staggering 5.4 litres per 100 kilometres over the 1600 km course, which included mountainous conditions and had to be negotiated at high average speeds that required some energetic driving, especially by crews of the smaller cars. More>>
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Daihatsu Turbo Charade  

Daihatsu Charade Turbo

1984 - 1987
These days buying a turbo charged car is par for the course, but in the early 80’s it was a rare thing, and usually associated with a performance vehicle. And that is exactly what the Daihatsu Charade Turbo was – a genuine hot hatch at a bargain basement price. When the Charade hit the showrooms it was asking just A$9195 – and it was almost as quick as the Nissan EXA. More>>
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Daihatsu DeTomaso Turbo Charade  

Daihatsu DeTomaso Charade Turbo

1984 - 1987
When the Daihatsu DeTomaso Turbo Charade first appeared at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1982, there were more than a few chuckles from various motoring journalists and writers - surely this was a "concept only" toy car that would never make it into serious production. More>>
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Daihatsu Rocky

Daihatsu Rocky

1984 - 1999
The Rocky went on to enjoy a long 15 year stay, however in the latter years the vehicle was seen as rather primitive. The 2.0 litre petrol engine was phased out in 1989, followed by the non-turbo diesel in 1990. By the mid 1990's the off road virtues of leaf spring suspension were largely forgotten, and the competition had evolved well beyond the solid underpinnings of the Rocky. What was once seen as solid was now perceived as primitive. More>>
Daimler Road Tests and Reviews
Daimler Conquest  

Daimler Conquest

1953 - 1956
Daimler replaced its elderly Consort model with an all new 'Conquest' model in 1953. The new Conquest had a shorter overall length and consequently less weight than the old Consort and was of a more modern design, finally leaving the pre-war styling cues behind. More>>
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Daimler Majestic Major  

Daimler Majestic Major

1959 - 1968
An unlikely high performer the Daimler Majestic was fitted with a brand new 4.7 litre hemi-head V8 that gave the vehicle a top speed of 193 km/h. Quicker than rival Jaguars and an astonishing 0 to 100 km/h in 9.7 seconds. More>>
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Daimler 104 Sportsman  

Daimler 104 Sportsman

1959 - 1968
This striking coupe built on the "104" chassis, so called because the prototype topped 104mph was made by Mulliners using a composite alloy/steel construction. Technically known as the 4 light saloon it became universally known as the Sportsman Coupe. Performance easily exceeded the 104 mph due to lighter weight and superior aerodynamics. Daimlers records, never complete at the best of times show app 69 cars built. More>>
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Daimler SP250  

Daimler SP250

1959 - 1964
The SP250 was designed to appeal to export markets - most particularly the USA - but never sold in the hoped-for quantities, nor was it ever profitable to its makers. Daimler, in fact, were taken over by Jaguar in 1960, who persevered with the SP250, eventually developing two improved versions of it, all with the same styling. More>>
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Daimler 2.5 V8  

Daimler 2.5 V8

1962 - 1969
Think of a V8 Daimler from the early 1960s and you will think of the SP250 - and why not, it was a brilliant car. But there was another V8 Daimler that came in saloon form, and was very nearly the equal. The 2.6 litre V8 was Daimler's sole representative in the medium price, luxury car field, but it offered performance equalled by only a few. More>>
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Daimler SP250

Daimler Sovereign Series III

1979 - 1987
Introduced in March 1979, the Series III versions of the Jaguar/ Daimler range represented a successful attempt to broaden the appeal of the vehicle with a number of important modifications which, most notably, modernized its appearance. More>>
Datsun Road Tests and Reviews
Datsun Bluebird P410  

Datsun Bluebird P410 1964

1964 - 1967
The 'Pininfarina' designed P410 Bluebird replaced the English inspired design of the 310/311/312 series, and usered in Datsun's use of unitary construction of the body, rather than a seperate chassis. More>>
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Datsun Bluebird P410  

Datsun Bluebird P410 1965

1964 - 1967
The 'Pininfarina' designed P410 Bluebird replaced the English inspired design of the 310/311/312 series, and usered in Datsun's use of unitary construction of the body, rather than a seperate chassis. More>>
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Datsun Bluebird P411  

Datsun Bluebird P411 1966

1964 - 1967
The 'Pininfarina' designed P410 Bluebird replaced the English inspired design of the 310/311/312 series, and usered in Datsun's use of unitary construction of the body, rather than a seperate chassis. More>>
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Datsun Bluebird  

Datsun Bluebird P411 1967

1964 - 1967
The 'Pininfarina' designed P410 Bluebird replaced the English inspired design of the 310/311/312 series, and usered in Datsun's use of unitary construction of the body, rather than a seperate chassis. More>>
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Datsun Bluebird  

Datsun Bluebird R411 SSS

1964 - 1967
The 'Pininfarina' designed P410 Bluebird replaced the English inspired design of the 310/311/312 series, and usered in Datsun's use of unitary construction of the body, rather than a seperate chassis. More>>
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Datsun Fairlady  

Datsun Fairlady

1965 - 1970
The lack of handling compared to its rivals resulted in Datsun not having the sales success they had hoped for - and needing to design an entirely new type of car. Enter the 240Z and the title of 'World's best selling sports car'. More>>
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Datsun 1000  

Datsun 1000

1967 - 1970
Released in 1967, the Datsun 1000 would quickly become one of the world's most popular small cars, and in just 2 short years Datsun had managed to manufacture and sell over half-a-million of them. More>>
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Datsun 1600  

Datsun 1600

1967 - 1972
When the Datsun 1600 hit Australian dealerships, the car was nothing short of a revelation. Sure, there was competition, but to come anywhere near the potential you needed to fork out around A$3000. You could shop around, and get near the quality for $2500 but you would have been peeing the proverbial against the wall. More>>
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Datsun 1600  

Datsun 1600 SSS

1967 - 1972
From 1967 to 1972 there was a car that won the respect of nearly everyone that drove it. Perhaps with less showroom appeal than the competition, the Datsun 1600 quickly etched itself into the psyche of many young Australians as arguably the first true "Performance 4". More>>
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Datsun Six  

Datsun Six

1969 - 1974
Early in 1969 Datsun was to release their "family six" alternative to the big Aussie sedans of the day, the handsome "Big Datsun Six". But Australia was one of some fifty-seven countries where the all new car was unveiled, it truly being a world car. More>>
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Datsun 240Z  

Datsun 240Z

1969 - 1975
Building street cred with such vehicles as the Honda S800 and Toyota 2000GT, Japan was starting to emerge as a legitimate sports car maker. The challenge for the Japanese was to break into the lucrative US market. More>>
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Datsun 1200  

Datsun 1200

1970 - 1973
The Datsun 1200 was the second generation Sunny in Japan. This new Sunny sported MacPherson strut front suspension and the A series engine had grown to 1171cc. More>>
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Datsun 120Y  

Datsun 120Y

1973 - 1977
Never a glamorous car in its hey day, the perennial 120Y can still be seen on the highways of today and, due to its poor road manners is not particularly collectable. But, as with all cars that have been out of production for over 20 years, they are becoming more scarce and an extremely good condition vehicle could just make a good buying decision. More>>
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Datsun 180B  

Datsun 180B

1973- 1977
Both the 180B and 200B models were extremely popular with Australian motorists, although it is rare to see one on the roads today. The time is fast approaching when 70's nostalgia buffs will lust for a good clean example, only to find there are none. More>>
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Datsun 180B SSS  

Datsun 180B SSS

1973- 1977
The 180 B SSS hardtop was a punchy, willing performer, but the main emphasis was on luxury and exclusivity. Unlike the 180B sedan, it was fully imported from Japan and the 45 per cent tariff burden precluded any chance of a saturation sales campaign. Notwithstanding, for 1973 its basic, manual-transmission price of A$3395 assured a competitive footing in the small prestige coupe market. More>>
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Datsun 260Z  

Datsun 260Z

1974 - 1978
Despite the increase in engine capacity, the new "Z" was actually slightly slower, and less sporting, than its predecessor. While it remained on sale to global markets for four years, in the US (which was its principle market) it was replaced by the lustier 280Z in less than a year. More>>
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Datsun 200B  

Datsun 200B

1977 - 1981
The Datsun 180B was replaced in October of 1977 with the 200B. Continuing with the Japanese styling the sedan was released with the fully imported as a sedan, a coupe that retained the SSS badge and a wagon. More>>
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Datsun Skyline 240K C210  

Datsun Skyline 240K C210

1977 - 1981
Launched outside of Japan in 1979, the Datsun Skyline was really a technically sophisticated coupe update of the old 240Z GT fastback, which was subsequently replaced by the 260Z and then the 280ZX. More>>
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Datsun Stanza  

Datsun Stanza

1978 - 1982
In Australia we knew it as the Stanza, but in other markets it was variously known as the "Violet", "Auster", "510", and "160J". Available locally in either GL or better equipped GX form, the Stanza was a revival of the shape and specification of the original highly successful Datsun 1600, which to our mind was the first really good Japanese car to be marketed overseas. More>>
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Datsun 280ZX  

Datsun 280ZX

1978 - 1983
It is always hard to follow up a brilliant first model car with subsequent iterations. Manufacturers really have no choice - they have to keep their product fresh in an attempt to lure buyers into their showrooms. More>>
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Datsun Cherry  

Datsun Cherry

1979 - 1982
The Datsun Cherry first appearing in 1970, then weighing 1477 Ib (670 kg). It was 11.84 ft (3.61 metres) long, and was one of the first Japanese front-drive cars. Over the years the Cherry ripened in size and weight, so much so that the third generation model, released in 1979, weighed 1885-1940 Ib (855-880 kg) in running order, and was 12.76 ft (3.89 metres) long. More>>
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Datsun Sunny  

Datsun Sunny

1979 - 1986
The fully imported Sunny was introduced in early 1979 as a successor to the outgoing 120Y model, and to supplement the locally built Stanza which had failed to produce the expected sales figures for Nissan. But following in the 120Y’s footsteps would certainly be a hard act to follow, particularly when the 120Y’s two major attributes were that it was both low priced an inexpensive to run. More>>
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Datsun Bluebird

Datsun Bluebird

1981 - 1986
In May 1981 the 200B was replaced with the Bluebird. The styling of the Bluebird moved towards a more European look with lower waistlines and simple lines. Retaining much of the running gear from the 200B, with a front engine, rear drive layout. More>>
Davrian Road Tests and Reviews
Davrian Imp Sports  

Davrian Imp Sports

1966 - 1974
Historically speaking, the mid 1960s could well have been the apogee of the type of small company which took 'off-the-shelf' items from standard cars and arrived at a vehicle specification which proved to be simple to construct yet which endowed the finished motor car with reserves of power, road-holding and handling far in excess of the rather prosaic motor cars produced by the big companies. A typical example of this kind of approach was in the products of Davrian Developments. More>>
Delage Road Tests and Reviews
Delage Type X

Delage Type X

1911
DeLorean's have a fibreglass body tub to which the stainless steel panels are bolted and a mild steel chassis which has an resin coating to protect against rust. More>>
DeTomaso Road Tests and Reviews
DeTomaso Mangusta  

DeTomaso Mangusta

1966 - 1971
While looking every bit the Italian exotic, the power was to come from the bargain Ford 289 ci V8 - but of course it was the Shelby-tuned version that had already appeared in AC Cobra, Ford GT-40 and Mustang GT-350. More>>
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DeTomaso Pantera  

DeTomaso Pantera

1970 - 1990
Powered by a Ford "Cleveland" 351 (5.7 litre) V8, this Italian-built exotic was able to offer supercar performance at a bargain price. Dubbed "The Poor Man's Lamborghini", the close relationship between Ford and De Tomaso saw Ford fully back the Pantera project in order to boost its image. More>>
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DeTomaso Deauville

DeTomaso Deauville

1972 - 1984
The Deauville was designed to deliver high-performance luxury transportation for four, and featured a flowing-yet-muscular design, handsome from any angle. More>>
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DeTomaso Longchamp

DeTomaso Longchamp

1972 - 1989
When the Longchamps was released, Alejandro de Tomaso had been designing, racing and building cars for 20 years. By that time Ford had completely bought out his interest in Ghia, Vignale and De Tomaso Automobili, so there was plenty of speculation as to what he would do with the superb looking Longchamp prototype. More>>
DMC DeLorean Road Tests and Reviews
DeLorean DMC12

DeLorean DMC12

1981 - 1983
DeLorean's have a fibreglass body tub to which the stainless steel panels are bolted and a mild steel chassis which has an resin coating to protect against rust. More>>
Dodge Road Tests and Reviews
Dodge Phoenix  

Dodge Phoenix

1960- 1973
The Phoenix was introduced in May 1960 as an Australian assembled version of the American Dodge Dart, positioned above the locally developed Chrysler Royal. It was offered only as a four door sedan and only with a 318 ci V8 engine. The Dart represented a then new American category between compacts and full-sized sedans - and it appealed to Australian motorists - who wanted a large but not gigantic luxury car with loads of power. More>>
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Dodge Charger  

Dodge Charger

1966 - 1969
Production of the Dodge Charger commenced in 1966, the car fitted with the 383ci, 325-horsepower V-8. Styling was based on the "fastback" roofline, featuring hidden headlights and four bucket seats. More>>
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Dodge Challenger  

Dodge Challenger

1970 - 1974
While the Charger is the muscle car most highly regarded today, the Challenger remains a close runner up and, like its predecessor, was available as a R/T model in both 2 door coupe and convertible configurations. As with all such American cars, the 'base' engine was an in-line six-cylinder unit, but the most exciting of the V8's, and the one which most people bought, was the 426ci 7 litre 'Hemi'. More>>
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Dodge Aries  

Dodge Aries

1980 - 1989
The Chrysler Corporation, deep in financial trouble by 1980, announced its front-drive 'K Cars', seemingly late in the day for the small US car race, but there was little doubt the corporation was depending very much on the new downsized models to get back in the black. More>>
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Dodge Viper

 

Dodge Viper

1992 - 2002
From the late 70s to early 80s, Chrysler was troubled by recession and bankruptcy. New president Lee Iacocca introduced a radical cost reduction regime, reducing models and reducing platforms - eventually to only one (the boring front-drive K-car platform). These changes helped Chrysler return to profitability, but the model lineup was unadventurous and hardly inspired car enthusiasts. More>>
Duesenberg Road Tests and Reviews
Duesenberg Model J

Model J


1929 - 1937
After buying out the Duesenberg operation, Cord also enlisted the help of Harry Miller to help design the Model J, the brief being that this new car would be the best in the world, no small feat! More>>

 

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Duesenberg Mormon Meteor  

SJ "Mormon Meteor"


1935
The development of the Mormon Meteor came about because of one man, Ab Jenkins. Known at the time as the "Speed King", Jenkins enlisted the help of the Duesenberg brothers to help develop a car capable of setting new speed records. More>>
Edsel Road Tests and Reviews
Edsel

Edsel

1957 - 1959
The 1957 Edsel has been rather unceremoniously referred to as a marketing blunder. Timing was probably the major reason for its reputation, as car buyers at the time were looking more for smaller vehicles and the Edsel became a victim of its own massive hype. Ford pitched this car at the lower medium market sector and forecast sales to be in the 200,000 region. More>>
Excalibur Road Tests and Reviews
Excalibur

Excalibur SSKL and SS Phaeton

1963 - 1990
Vintage and veteran cars began to become popular in the 1950s and 1960s, collectors and scouring the world looking for un-discovered cars. Soon most of the available cars were in the hands of collectors and prices began to escalate dramatically, so much so that the less wealthy enthusiast was unable to even to contemplate buying a vintage car. Many owners simply put their cars away as investments in just the same way as paintings and other antiques. More>>
Fairthorpe Road Tests and Reviews
Fairthorpe TX

Fairthorpe TX GT

1967 - 1976
Introduced in late 1968, the TX cars offer the individuality of the specialist sports car with the easy servicing and maintenance of the mass-produced sports car. The Fairthorpes-based on a backbone chassis, are powered by 1500 or 2000cc Triumph engines and designated the TX1500 and TX2000 respectively. More>>
Ferrari Road Tests and Reviews
Ferrari 750 Monza  

Ferrari 750 Monza

1954 - 1955
Long on performance but short on tolerance, the Monza was as a potent as it was beautiful. It became known as a mean machine, with a killer-car reputation. At the 1955 Le Mans it proved that it was no ordinary car as it hurled the 750 Monza Ferrari around the Sarthe circuit. More>>
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Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa  

Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa

1956 - 1961
The phrase "Testa Rossa" means "red head." The most well known, the 250TR, was produced from 1957 to 1958; only 2 factory cars and 19 customer cars were built. After the 250 GTO, the 250 Testa Rossa is the second most valuable Ferrari model A 1957 250 TR sold in 2011 for $16,400,000, a new world record auction price for a car. More>>
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Ferrari 250 GTO  

Ferrari 250 GTO

1962 - 1964
GTO - three letters signifying a peak in a famous, possibly the most famous, autohistory. 12 cylinders, 3 litres, 280bhp, 175mph - bald figures, without gazing at the sleek aluminium coachwork. More>>
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Ferrari 275 GTV  

Ferrari 275 GTV

1964 - 1968
The Ferrari road car really made its presence felt with the release of the 275 GTB. For the first time Ferrari had produced a car with sophisticated suspension ensuring that a car as quick as this could be driven in comfort. More>>
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Ferrari Dino 206 / 246  

Ferrari Dino 206/246

1967 - 1974
Designated "206GT", in which 20 means 2.0 litres and 6 means six cylinders, the engine was actually built by Fiat and shared with Fiat Dino, not because it would be cheaper, but because Ferrari needed the additional volume to qualify for FIA's production requirement for racing engines. More>>
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Ferrari Daytona  

Ferrari Daytona

1968 - 1973
The Ferrari Daytona 365 GTB/4 was perceived proudly by the manufacturer as its last attempt at superfast front-engined Grand Tourers. More>>
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Ferrari Dino 308 GT4  

Ferrari Dino 308 GT4

1973 - 1980
When introduced in 1973 (officially unveiled at the Paris Motor Show) the Ferrari Dino 308 GT4 was much more than a big brother to the familiar, beautiful little 246GT. It was almost an entirely new car, save for the steering wheel and alloy road wheels. More>>
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Ferrari 308 GTB  

Ferrari 308 GTB/GTS

1975 - 1985
There was something special about the 308 GTB. It represented the then latest Ferrari's Dinos and it had its suspension tune polished by no less a test driver than world champion Niki Lauda. Sceptics suggested that Lauda's name was hung on all the Ferraris, but it wasn't so. At Fiorano, Ferrari's own test track outside Modena in north eastern Italy, Lauda spent a lot of time roaring around the track being monitored by TV cameras all the way. More>>
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Ferrari 400  

Ferrari 400

1976 - 1989
An automatic Ferrari - the idea seemed almost like sacrilege when the 400 was introduced in 1978. Somehow it seemed totally out of keeping with the Italian marque's traditions, as was the fact that the automatic transmission was from the American giant General Motors. More>>
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Ferrari 308 GTS  

Ferrari 308 GTS

1977 - 1985
Noise is both difficult and expensive to engineer out of a car – it is inherent in the engine and gearbox. But when a manufacturer creates the perfect balance of mechanical noise, it can only be enhanced when such a car is available sans roof. Even with the wind charging over the top of the windscreen of the Ferrari 308 GTS at high speed every sound was to be enjoyed, savoured. More>>
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Ferrari F355  

Ferrari F355

1994 - 1999
The Ferrari F355 was the first new model under the new vision Luca di Montezemolo. Individual butterfly valves for each cylinder improved throttle response, resulting in a record-breaking 108.7 hp/litre specific output. In total, there are 380 horses running under the F355's bonet at 8,250 rpm. More>>
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Ferrari 575M Maranello  

Ferrari 575M Maranello

2003 -
While Ferrari increased the size of the already awesome V12 engine to 5748cc, it is the Formula 1 derived transmission for which the 575M Maranello is most famous. More>>
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Ferrari F60

Ferrari F60

2003 -
The F60 develops a blistering 650bhp, has seven gears and punches to 100 km/h from a standstill in 3.2sec, just 0.1 seconds slower than the Ferrari F2002 of Michael Schumacher! More>>
Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
Fiat 1100 103

Fiat 1100 103

1955 - 1960
The Fiat 1100 is built on very practical lines. It was well equipped, for a low-priced car, with such refinements as a really good heating and ventilating system, screen washers, self-parking wipers, and lights in engine and luggage compartments. More>>
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Fiat 600

Fiat 600

1955 - 1977
The Fiat 600 series was part of the postwar Italian 'Economic Miracle' and was produced in relatively large numbers from its debut at the Geneva Motorshow of 1955. More>>
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Fiat 500  

Fiat 500

1957 - 1977
This tiny egg-shaped car is now seen in somewhat cult status with its miniature size appealing to millions. It was introduced in 1957 as a type of transportation for the masses and by the end of production some four million were built. More>>
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Fiat 1500 Cabriolet  

Fiat 1500 Cabriolet

1963 - 1967
The 1500 Cabriolet was an enjoyable car to drive. It was aimed more at the touring sports car buyer than at the race driver, and it performed and handled almost as well as more powerful sports cars in its price class. More important to most buyers of two-seater roadsters was the fact that the Fiat was very comfortable, extremely smooth and quiet, and had more usable luggage space than almost any other car in its class. More>>
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Fiat 500 Abarth  

Fiat 500 Abarth

1963 - 1972
The Abarth was also no noisier than the 500, despite the two very large diameter tail pipes of the special exhaust system. Best of all, the Abarth conversion made an already good car "great", just as reliable, incredibly nimble, more agile and with the Italian flair for knowing what a driver enjoys. In a word - Brilliant. More>>
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Fiat 500F Berlina  

Fiat 500 F Berlina

1965 - 1972
Like any entirely new model, it was only natural that the Fiat 500 should mature. Thankfully Fiat resisted the temptation to enlarge the car, nor change the character - but maybe that was because it had become so damn popular. Just as collectable as the original Fiat 500, just as sexy, and one of the only micro cars that a bloke will look "seriously cool" driving. And while we can't give it a 5 star collectability rating, it deserves the 5 star cool rating. More>>
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Fiat 850 Coupe

Fiat 850 Coupe

1965 - 1971
The 850 sportscar arrived just a year after the saloon model in 1965 as a neat fast-back four seater. Despite near useless rear seats the 850 was hugely popular. More>>
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Fiat Dino  

Fiat Dino

1966 - 1973
In 1969 the Fiat Dino had its V6 engine increased from two to 2.4 litres, and its cylinder block was cast in iron instead of light-alloy. The new block was standardised to simplify manufacture (the old light-alloy block had separate cylinder liners which had to be inserted) and to ensure against water leaks as the engine aged. More>>
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Fiat 124  

Fiat 124

1966 - 1974
At first glance the 124 could be considered unremarkable; it was boxy and had un-aerodynamic lines, being obviously based on the earlier 1100 Saloon, but those lines were also functional and were capable of containing five adults in reasonable comfort. An wagon version was announced at the same time. More>>
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Fiat 124 Spider  

Fiat 124 Spider

1966 - 1985
Manufactured for nearly 20 years shows why the Spider has been one of the most successful Italian sportscars ever produced. More>>
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Fiat 124 Spider  

Fiat 125

1967 - 1972
In 1968 the Fiat 125, with a fully imported price of A$2898, was arguably one of the best value cars in Australia, apart from the Big Three compact models and the eternal Peugeot 404. The 124 sold quite well in Australia too, but was deemed a little pricey for its size and weight by some, although they probably never actually drove it. More>>
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Fiat 130 Coupe  

Fiat 130 Coupe

1971 - 1977
Despite being unpopular this car was actually very finely engineered with perfect proportions and superb elegance with ample room for four passengers. More>>
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Fiat 132  

Fiat 132

1972 - 1982
Unfortunately many believed the Fiat 132 was a somewhat backward step, particularly given that the car, as a replacement for the Fiat 125, retained both rear-wheel-drive and a live back-axle. The cars lower line met with a mixed reception, some people considering that the 132's shape was "Japanese-inspired". More>>
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Fiat X1/9  

Fiat X1/9

1972 - 1982
Fiat X1/9 was the earliest lightweight mid-engined sports car made - the biggest challenge at the time being how to locate all the mechans without compromising useable space. More>>
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Fiat 126  

Fiat 126

1972 - 1993
The Fiat 126, successor to the 500, represented a modernisation and mild revision of the old Fiat 500 formula. The result was a low-priced car with a rather more boxy outward appearance, but still possessing all the desirable qualities of the earlier Fiat 500. More>>
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Fiat 131 Mirafiori  

Fiat 131 Mirafiori

1974 - 1984
Motoring journalists at the time noted that the 131 Mirafiori's engine was "...more lusty than refined", churning out the power eagerly. It was not a great car, but it was well accomplished and offered a better than reasonable drive for the money. More>>
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Fiat 131 Abarth Rally  

Fiat 131 Abarth Rally

1974 - 1980
The Abarth acted as a replacement for the valiant 123 Spider as Fiat's warhorse for road events. The main modifications included: two-litre engine with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, 140-147 bhp DIN (104 - 110 kW), five speed gearbox, independent rear suspension, four wheel disc brakes, extra wide wheelrims and aerodynamic stabilisers on the chunky bodywork. More>>
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Fiat Strada / Ritmo  

Fiat Strada / Ritmo

1978 - 1988
It would be difficult to determine whether it was the Alfasud or the Fiat Strada that won the “race to rust” championship, but both were worthy contenders and near the top of their field in their ability to self destruct. More>>
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Fiat Panda  

Fiat Panda Mark 1

1980 - 1986
The small front-drive Fiat Panda was so named, we assume, because of its stripey look. Most people were no doubt thankful that the Fiat Group decided to abandon type-numbering for their cars with the introduction of the Panda, and more would fall in love with the cars practical and clever design, which due to the use of many already-in-production components, minimised its manufaccturing problems. More>>
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Fiat Argenta  

Fiat Argenta

1981 - 1986
The Italian flair for high performance luxury cars was never more evident than in 1981 when Fiat released the second major facelift of the 132 model, the wonderful Argenta. At the time it was Fiat's Australian flagship, and for good reason. The new model was bristling with modern technology, and was brimming with high equipment levels. More>>
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Fiat Croma  

Fiat Croma

1985 - 1996
The Croma received a significant facelift in 1991 with new front design including changes to the lights, bumpers grille and sheet-metal changes to wings and bonnet. Also in 1991 the direct injected diesel engine was equipped with variable geometry turbocharger. The original Fiat Croma was a much loved favourite of the used-car bargain-hunter in Europe, but was strangely berated by everyone else (including Fiat dealers). More>>
Ford Capri Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Capri  

Ford Capri Mk.I

1969 - 1972
The Ford Capri was first introduced into Australia in May, 1969 and was initially available only as a 1600 Deluxe or a 1600 GT. In February, 1970, the 1600 GT was replaced by the more powerful V6 3000GT, although a 1600 XL model was introduced to fill the void left by the 1600 GTs demise. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri GT 1600

1969 - 1970
Capri 1600 GT - "The car that reshapes your life" was how the official Ford brochure described the Capri! .....you slip behind the wheel and something happens. The world suddenly looks a little better to you. And you relax back in your snug bucket seat knowing that your Capri makes you look a little better to the world, too. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri GT V6 3000

1970 - 1972
The Capri 3000GT was released into Australia in 25th February, 1970, and then only as a 4-speed manual. Although a little pricey, it was an immediate success, selling 1,502 units to the end of 1970. The 3-speed Borg Warner 35 automatic version was released later in the year and sold some 167 units before years end. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri Perana

1970 - 1973
The name ‘Perana’ coined by Basil Green Motors, of Johannesburg for its engine transplant conversions on popular Ford models has come to be synonymous with “performance", both on road and track. More>>
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Ford Capri May Turbo  

Ford Capri May Turbo

1970 - 1974
Mike May (Europe's first Formula Junior champion and a winning Spyder RS racer) was a German-domiciled Swiss turbo specialist – and his V6 2.6 turbo kit was keyed to a specific engine/gearing combination, as designed on his own engine dyno. These were then sold as after-sales kits through selected Ford dealers. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri RS2600

1970 - 1974
The one millionth Ford Capri was an RS2600, and was built in August 1973. This Capri was never officially sold in the UK, although a few have now been imported. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri RS3100

1973 - 1974
In November 1973, at Ford's Halewood plant in the UK, production of the RS3100 began. Production of the RS3100 actually overlapped with the Capri MKII and was intermittent at best. More>>
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Ford Capri  

Ford Capri MKII

1974 - 1978
In February 1974, the Capri Mk2 was introduced. After 1.2 million cars sold, and with the 1973 oil crisis, Ford chose to make the new car more suited to everyday driving, with a shorter bonnet, larger cabin and the adoption of a hatchback rear door. More>>
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Ferguson Formula Capri  

Ferguson Formula Capri MKII

1974 - 1978
One of the lesser known iterations of the iconic Capri was the Ferguson Formula. Only subtle clues marked this Capri as different from the thousands of other Cologne-built coupes. A skid plate neatly tucked under the front end and a small bulge to the right of the transmission hump hinted at the extensive modifications within. More>>
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Ford Capri MkII Ghia  

Ford Capri MKII Ghia 3 Litre V6

1974 - 1978
Today there is a growing allegiance of Capri aficionados, and one of the most keenly sought is the Capri Ghia V6 3 Litre. At launch the Capri II 3000 GT was considered to be one of the best value-for-money performance cars on the market, although the replacement of the "GXL" and "E" iterations with the Ghia moniker did not present quite the value you would have expected. More>>
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Ford Capri

Ford Capri MKIII

1978 - 1986
The Capri MKIII, officially referred to as "Project Carla", was little more than an update of the MKII. Production began in April 1977 with the first cars being available in March 1978, but failed to halt a terminal decline in sales. However, this model was used in the TV series The Professionals, which was credited with keeping interest in the car in the UK. More>>
Ford Cortina Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Consul Cortina Mk.I  

Ford Consul Cortina Mk.I

1962 - 1966
In the late 1950’s it was apparent that the aging Anglia 105E would no longer be able to maintain it’s market share, and an all new car would be needed to help Ford compete against the likes of the Vauxhall Victor and Hillman Minx. More>>
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Ford Consul Cortina Estate  

Ford Consul Cortina Estate

1962 - 1966
The Estate Wagon version of the Consul-Cortina was very popular at release - and for good reason - it was an exceptionally good and well packaged car. It was economical too, with an overall fuel consumption figure of around 20 mpg, rising to around 25 on the open highway, and around 18 mpg in city traffic. More>>
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Ford Consul Cortina GT  

Ford Consul Cortina GT

1963 - 1966
The Consul-Cortina GT quickly garnered a stellar reputation. There were factory teams and privately owned cars that were all doing well in saloon races in the UK – and this inevitably led to success on the European rally circuit. Ford felt the car was so good that they decided to export it to the USA. More>>
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Ford Lotus Cortina GT  

Ford Lotus Cortina GT

1963 - 1970
When Colin Chapman and Ford collaborated to develop a race and rally winner - the end result was the Lotus Cortina. From Ford came the basic two door Cortina shell and front suspension, where Lotus installed its own 105 bhp twin-cam engine, close ratio 4-speed gearbox and rear suspension. More>>
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Ford Cortina GT500  

Ford Cortina GT500

1965
A car seldom remembered these days, except perhaps for the Cortina aficionados, is the wonderful Cortina GT500. The brainchild of Harry Firth, the GT500 was manufactured by Ford Australia to satisfy homologation rules to allow it to race in  the Armstrong 500. More>>
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Ford Cortina Mk. II  

Ford Cortina Mk. II

1966 - 1972
The second incarnation of the Cortina was designed by Roy Haynes, and launched on the 18th October 1966, four years after the original. Although the launch was accompanied by the slogan "New Cortina is more Cortina", the car, at 168 inches (430 cm) in length, was fractionally shorter than before. More>>
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Ford Cortina Mk. II GT  

Ford Cortina Mk. II GT

1966 - 1972
In autumn 1966 the Mk.II Cortina GT was released. The body was, of course, completely restyled, along with the entire Cortina lineup, but initially the car was still using most of the Mk.I GT drivetrain. More>>
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Ford Lotus Cortina Mark 2  

Ford Lotus Cortina Mk. II

1966 - 1970
With the Mark 2 Cortina, Ford would continue their association with Lotus. The new model Cortina retained much of its dynamic performance too, yet it was a much more refined car than its predecessor. More>>
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Savage Cortina V6  

Ford Cortina 1600E

1967 - 1970
One of the best loved versions of the Cortina appeared in 1967, the 1600E. The 1600E offered a blend of sporting style and luxury with its comprehensive specification. Standard equipment included sports suspension, Rostyle 5.5" J rim wheels, spot lamps, vinyl roof and metallic paint. More>>
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Savage Cortina V6  

Savage Cortina Mk. II V6

1967 - 1970
The "Big Engine - Light Chassis" formula had been tried before, and Uren knew that significant chassis modification would be required if the V6 iteration was to be anything more than simply a quick straight-line performer. More>>
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Ford Cortina TC  

Ford Cortina TC

1970 - 1974
There are perhaps 2 main reasons for the downturn in the popularity of the Cortina, for starters the Japanese were making big inroads at the time, and unfortunately the Cortina was quickly gaining a bad reputation for poor quality and reliability. More>>
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Ford Cortina TD  

Ford Cortina TD

1974 - 1977
Most commentators of the day knew that the objective of the TD release was to remedy the misdemeanours of the previous model, but many lamented the continued lack of quality and poor road manners. Brake fade, steering with a mind of its own on unmade surfaces and, in the case of the 4 cylinder, completely underwhelming performance became the hallmarks of the TD. More>>
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Ford Cortina TE

Ford Cortina TE

1977 - 1979
When the TE body style first appeared it almost created a sensation; it was the first of the European-look medium cars. It looked impressive and solid, and gave an air of rugged dependability. Buyers were familiar with the engines and their reliability had never been in doubt. More>>
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Ford Cortina TF

Ford Cortina TF

1980 - 1983
The rest of the world knew it as the Cortina Mark V, but here in Australia we knew it as the TF. Released in 1980, there were 4 variants, from the L, GL and Ghia variants and with an optional S-Pack also available (There was over $1000 of options on the S Pack list, but Ford only asked for an extra $583). More>>
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Ford Telstar

Ford Telstar

1983 - 1987
When the Telstar was launched Ford claimed that the Cortina replacement was very nearly sourced from the UK, and the brilliant Sierra. Instead we got Toyo Kogyo’s 626 - partly because of Ford’s existing relationship with the Mazda sourced Laser/Meteor range, and partly because adapting the Sierra for Australian compliance and roads would have been a little more expensive. More>>
Ford Escort Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Escort Mk. 1  

Ford Escort Mk. 1

1968 - 1975
The rear-wheel-drive Mk1 Escort came as an 1100 or 1300 and in both 2 or 4 door sedan, and in some markets also as a two-door estate, or in sporty form as a GT or Twin Cam. All the Escort engines were based on a new Kent crossflow unit, which proved very suitable for tuning and modification. More>>
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Ford Escort Twin Cam  

Ford Escort Twin-Cam

1968 - 1970
While other sporting Ford's could be called sedans capable of being raced or rallied, the Twin-Cam Escort was unashamedly a racing sedan de-tuned for road use. In production form, with quantity sales needed to justify its homologaation as a Touring Car, the Twin-Cam gave the customer exactly what they expected More>>
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Ford Escort RS 1600  

Ford Escort RS 1600

1970 - 1974
The successful Escort Twin Cam was replaced by the more powerful Escort in 1968, the RS1600. The letters "RS" stood for "Rally Sport", a brand name invented by Ford and one that continued for many years. Quickly the term "RS" came to be known for high performance Ford's. More>>
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Ford Escort Mk. 2  

Ford Escort Mk. 2

1975 - 1981
The first major styling revision occurred in 1975, giving the Escort a crisp lean flowing style that was well in proportion and arguably a cut above the small car offerings emanating from Japan. The interior was always functional, but was somewhat Spartan in comparison to the Japanese cars – but on the plus side the seats were extremely comfortable even on very long drives. More>>
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Ford Escort Mk. 2 Ghia  

Ford Escort Mk. 2 Ghia

1975 - 1981
For the over ten years that the Ford Escorts was on the Australian market, it underwent many and varied model improvements, including different engines and changes to its  image. Starting off with the 1.1 litre Kent, they had six engines in the next eight years, and by 1981 the 1.6 litre was offered on the L Sedan, with the option of the 2.01itre in the GL, and the 2.0 litre only in the top-of-the-line Ghia. More>>
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Ford Escort RS 1800  

Ford Escort RS 1800

1975 - 1977
Based on the Mk II Escort the RS1800 closely followed the original RS1600 concept. The RS1800 used a 1835cc version of the Cosworth BDA engine and produced 115bhp. Many special features were standard on the RS1800 including stiffened suspension, wide wheels and an uprated gearbox. More>>
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Ford Escort RS 2000  

Ford Escort RS 2000

1976 - 1980
The RS2000 used a 110bhp Pinto engine which meant the car could reach over 110mph. Cosmetically, the biggest difference to the previous model was in the uniquely angled GRP nose panel which contained four headlamps. More>>
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Ford Escort Mark 3 Erika  

Ford Escort Mk. 3 Erika

1980 - 1986
The long-awaited 'Erika' was an expensive event for the Ford Motor Company, and revealed itself to be the Company's second front-drive model, but with an even more upmarket specification than the Fiesta which had brought them into the front-drive/transverse engine sector. More>>
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Ford Escort RS1600i  

Ford Escort RS 1600i

1981- 1984
The concept of the RS 1600i Escort was defined in the prototype shown almost at the 1980 Frankfurt car show, and the definitive version of the car went on to be produced in the number of 5000 necessary for homologation in Group A. More>>
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Ford Escort Mark 4  

Ford Escort Mk. 4 Erika 86

1986 - 1990
The Escort Mark III received a facelift in early 1986. Codenamed within Ford as "Erika–86", it was instantly recognisable as an updated version of the previous model, with a smooth style nose and the "straked" rear lamp clusters smoothed over. More>>
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Ford Laser KA/KB  

Ford Laser KA

1981 - 1983
Ford's long serving rear-wheel-drive Escort was due for replacement both here in Australia and in Europe. Through various model updates and styling changes the Escort was able to stay in service far longer than its mechanical specifications suggested it should, although the smallest of the Ford’s always had a huge allegiance of fans, and we are sure many will take us to task on making this claim. More>>
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Ford Meteor KB

Ford Laser and Meteor KB

1983 - 1985
The Laser/Meteor range was a pleasantly straight forward product which had established itself as a number one in the small car market by the end of 1982, with sales in excess of 50,000. Meteor backed this performance right from its introduction in March 1983. More>>
Ford Fairlane, Landau and LTD Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Fairlane ZA  

Ford Fairlane ZA

1967 - 1968
Through the years, the various models of Fairlane followed the Falcon onto the market, changing when the Falcon did, and using their own unique two letter code to distinguish the cars. The ZA closely followed the XR Falcon onto the market, and used many of the smaller car’s components, not just drivetrain and suspension, but even the doors were the same. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZB  

Ford Fairlane ZB

1968 - 1969
Minor revisons to the front and rear styling marked the ZB. The tail lamp treatment was altered, retaining the large square Galaxie style lampdivided into 2 parts by a rectangular indicator lens, replacing the central circular one. The optional V8 changed too, increasing in size form 289ci to 302ci. The range retained its two trim levels, Custom and upscale 500. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZC  

Ford Fairlane ZC

1969 - 1970
The ZC marked the first noticable change to the Fairlane, swapping from horizontal to vertical headlamp orientation. For long a U.S. styling device, it was unusual that Ford in Australia would go to this design after it had been abandoned across the Pacific. By necessity it did raise the front wings to accomodate the lights and this gave the ZC a larger and more imposing look. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZD  

Ford Fairlane ZD

1970 - 1972
There were minor styling changes to the ZD, the grille became bolder and the tail lamps were changed and separated by a broad trim panel. While the car had not altered much in style, it retained its grip on the market place, despite the appearance of locally produced rivals. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZF  

Ford Fairlane ZF

1972 - 1973
The ZF marked a complete new re-styling of the Fairlane, now wholly Australian designed and produced. It is easy to see that the design was influenced by the new XA Falcon, retaining, as the previous cars had done, the basic central structure including the doors, and bulking out either end. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZG  

Ford Fairlane ZG

1972 - 1973
The ZG marked yet another gentle revision of its predecessor with a bolder, four horizontal bar grille and tail lamp tweaks. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZH  

Ford Fairlane ZH

1976 - 1979
The ZH was Ford's answer to all the citiscism of its predecessors. While again retaining the central structure of the XC Falcon, the designers put much extra bulk into the car, not only giving it a big car look, but also actually lengthening it as well. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZJ  

Ford Fairlane ZJ

1979 - 1982
The new Fairlane was smaller and lighter than its predecessor as it shared its floorpan with the Falcon Wagon. Fortunately though the engineers were able to maximise interior space so that, inside the cabin at least, the new model was actually bigger than before. More>>
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Ford Fairlane ZK  

Ford Fairlane ZK

1982 - 1984
Released in March 1982, visually there was little to diferentiate the new model Fairlane from its predecessor, the ZJ. It was naturally under the skin where most changes occured, the most important being the improvement to the 4.1 litre six cylinder engine. More>>
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Ford Landau  

Ford Landau

1973 - 1976
The Landau was a coupe version of the LTD, based on the Falcon hardtop, and was Ford Australia's first Aussie designed luxury two-door coupe. It retained the frontal treatment of the full size LTD with its disappearing head lamps and the full width tail lamps. More>>
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Ford LTD FA  

Ford LTD FA

1973 - 1976
The LTD was launched as Ford's new flagship model, replacing versions of the imported U.S. Galaxie. It marked a bold initiative by Ford, determined to capture the local top of the range market and become the de facto limousine of choice for government and business. More>>
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Ford LTD FB

Ford LTD FB

1976 - 1979
Once more it is apparent that the FB, or P6, LTD is based upon the equivalent Fairlane, but with an impressive frontal treatment. With its Rolls Royce style grille, and the large circular head lamps set in a bluff vertical front panel, the P6 presented a bold and dominating presence to the road. Also impressive was the even greater wheelbase, and a list of standard features that wanted for nothing. More>>
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Ford LTD FB

Ford LTD FC

1979 - 1982
The introduction of the ZJ Fairlane and the FC LTD luxury Fords, based on the XD Falcon, demonstrated just how much thought Broadmeadows had put into its program for the 1980s. So many of the parts that made up XD, ZJ and FC were totally interchangeable, and were manufactured on the same machine ensuring savings in tooling and manufacture. While the LTD had 75% of its parts in common with the XD Falcon, the remaining 25% were specifically ZJ/FC. More>>
Ford Falcon Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Falcon XK  

Ford Falcon XK

1960 - 1962
The XK was the first Falcon released, and was based very much on the equivalent U.S. Falcon, copying its styling almost without change. More>>
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Ford Falcon XL  

Ford Falcon XL

1962 - 1964
The tail lamps were revised and the rear roof line was changed to reflect Ford's Thunderbird style theme. More>>
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Ford Falcon XM  

Ford Falcon XM

1964 - 1965
The XM was another styling facelift of the original XK, with a much heavier and impressive front grille. More>>
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Ford Falcon XP  

Ford Falcon XP

1965 - 1966
The XP was the last facelift of the original Falcon and featured an aggressive, squared off look to the front end and more solid styling overall. More>>
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Ford Falcon XR  

Ford Falcon XR

1966 - 1968
The new XR range again followed a US design, hoping to capitalise on the phenomenal success of the Mustang. More>>
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Ford Falcon XT  

Ford Falcon XT

1968 - 1969
The XT Falcon was a mild restyle of the previous model, with a barely altered grille, but distinctive new tail lamps, circular lamps still, but cut by large rectangular indicator lenses. More>>
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Ford Falcon XW  

Ford Falcon XW

1969 - 1970
The XW represented the first real attempt to more definitely differentiate the Australian Falcon from the styling of its U.S. equivalent. More>>
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Ford Falcon XY  

Ford Falcon XY

1970 - 1972
The XY marked the apogee of the second generation Falcons, superior in performance to its competitors, better built, fitted with a range of locally designed six cylinder engines, and in GT form, producing the ultimate and fastest Falcon of them all. More>>
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Ford Falcon XA  

Ford Falcon XA

1972 - 1973
The XA model was the first Falcon completely designed and built in Australia. More>>
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Ford Falcon XB  

Ford Falcon XB

1973 - 1976
The XB featured a slight restyle of the previous model, featuring a cleaner but more aggressive front end with a forward sloping bonnet. More>>
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Ford Falcon XB GS  

Ford Falcon XB GS - Grand Sport Rally Pack

1973 - 1976
The Grand Sport rally pack was itself nothing more than dressing up – even Ford admitted as much. The only practical inclusions in the pack were the complete instrumentation which included tacho, oil, fuel, temperature gauges and voltmeter. More>>
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Ford Falcon XC

Ford Falcon XC

1976 - 1979
The XC was a further re-style of the third generation Falcon. The refined look was achieved by reducing the slope of the grille and introducing large rectangular headlamps. More>>
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Ford Falcon XD  

Ford Falcon XD

1979 - 1982
The XD Falcon marked the start of Ford's determined push to become market leader in Australia, a goal they ultimately achieved, but one that at the release of the XD beyond their grasp. More>>
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Ford Falcon XE  

Ford Falcon XE

1982 - 1984
The XE celebrated a defining point for Ford Australia as they finally passed GMH in the sales wars, and with a product that they least expected, the Falcon. More>>
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Ford Falcon XF  

Ford Falcon XF

1984 - 1988
The XF represented the last of the fourth generation cars, and featured softer, more rounded styling with revsions to the grille and bumpers, and new tail lamps. More>>
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Ford Falcon EA  

Ford Falcon EA

1988 - 1990
Much like the "BA" of 2002, the "EA" had countless improvements over its predecessors. Most importantly for Ford was the introduction of new fuel injected 3.2 and 3.9 litre (SOHC) engines - which were a great improvement on the harsh and thirsty 3.3 and 4.1 litre pushrod sixes they replaced. More>>
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Ford Falcon EB  

Ford Falcon EB

1991 - 1993
The EB facelift hardly altered the apearance of the EA, however the big news for V8 fans was the re-introduction of the V8 (available for the first time since 1983). More>>
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Ford Falcon ED  

Ford Falcon ED

1993 - 1994
Even though there were over 280 changes made to the EB to create the ED, Ford's continued development of the EB had seen so many improvements that the ED was simply an evolution of an already popular and reliable car. More>>
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Ford Falcon EF

Ford Falcon EF

1994 - 1996
Undoubtedly the most significant "facelift" of the "E" series Falcon was the "EF". With the notable exception of the doors, the remaining panels were all new, and now the luxury Fairmont and Fairmont Ghia versions could be distinguished by completely different frontal treatments. More>>
Ford GT Falcon Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Falcon XR GT  

Ford Falcon XR GT

1968 - 1968
In 1968 the XR model began the legend that was to be the GT. This family car muscled out 225HP thanks to the 289 Windsor V8. More>>
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Ford Falcon XT GT  

Ford Falcon XT GT

1968 - 1969
The XT GT was more refined and faster than its predecessor. Producing 230hp thanks to a 4.9L 302 Windsor V8, only 1415 of these were built. More>>
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Ford Falcon XW GT  

Ford Falcon XW GT

1969 - 1970
Ford upped the ante with the XW by fitting the 351 cubic inch (5.8 litre) Windsor V8 with an output of 290 bhp (217KW) and 385 ft/lbs of torque. More>>
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Ford Falcon XY GT  

Ford Falcon XY GT

1970 - 1972
Simply put - it was the world's fastest four-door production car for many years. More>>
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Ford Falcon XA GT  

Ford Falcon XA GT

1972 - 1973
The XA GT was the first Australian designed Ford, and the GT version was a much more refined car than its predecessors which had been designed more as road going race cars than true Grand Tourers. More>>
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Ford Falcon XA Superbird  

Ford Falcon XA Superbird

1972 - 1973
The Superbird started life as a one off show special, designed to attract attention at the Melbourne and Sydney motorshows. It was such a success however that Ford decided to release a limited run of Superbirds. More>>
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Ford Falcon XB GT  

Ford Falcon XB GT

1973 - 1976
The XB ran out the GT line, existing until June, 1976 after which there were no more GT's. More>>
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Ford Falcon XB John Goss Special  

Ford Falcon XB John Goss Special

1975 - 1976
Alongside Kevin Bartlett ("KB"), John Goss won the James Hardie 1000km race at Mount Panorama in 1974 in a very close race, and in August, 1975 Ford released a run of XB based John Goss Special limited edition hardtops. More>>
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Ford Falcon XC Cobra

Ford Falcon XC Cobra

1978 - 1979
When they decided that the XD Falcon would be a four door model only, Ford found themselves near the end of the XC production run with 400 unsold hardtop body shells. To sell them they created the Cobra, and in so doing created an instant classic. More>>
Ford UK and Europe Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Prefect  

Ford Prefect

1938 - 1959
The Ford Prefect was first introduced in 1938 and at the time was the first Ford to be designated by a model name. Its model number was E93A. More>>
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Ford Anglia  

Ford Anglia

1940 - 1967
Developed during the 1930’s as a cheap-and-cheerful mode of transport following the lack of success of the more expensive Model A, the original Anglia featured typically conservative design cue’s with its upright radiator and black paint work, and looked almost identical to the 4 door Prefect. More>>
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Ford Consul  

Ford Consul/Zephr/Zodiac Mk. I/II

1950 - 1972
The Consul produced in 1950 boasted a raft of technology which included a unitary constructed chassis which resulted in a lighter structure. More>>
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Ford Zephyr Six Mark I  

Ford Zephyr Six Mark I

1951 - 1956
Despite outward appearances, both the FJ Holden and Zephyr had a lot in common. Both were powered by small capacity sixes, the Holden's displacing 2171cm3 and the Zephyr's 2262cm3. In straight line performance there was little difference and both were hotshots in their day with quicker acceleration than most other family sedans and some sports cars. More>>
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Ford Zephyr Mark III  

Ford Zephyr Mark III

1962 - 1966
The MKIII Zephyr was introduced in 1962 which saw an end to the 1950's style Consuls, Zephyrs and Zodiacs. Arguably the Mark III Zephyr's biggest claim to fame was that it was the first car assembled in Australia to have curved glass side windows, an innovation aimed to provide passengers with more elbow and hip room. More>>
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Ford Corsair  

Ford Corsair

1963 - 1970
The Corsair had unusual and quite bold styling for its day, with a sharp horizontal V-shaped crease at the very front of the car into which round headlights were inset. This gave the car an apparently aerodynamic shape. More>>
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Ford Granada  

Ford Cortina Mark 4

1976 - 1979
The transition from the Mark III to the new Mark IV Cortina in 1976 was a good indication of just how alert Ford was to changing fads and fashions in the motor industry. Indeed to a great extent the company led fashion rather than followed it with the Mark IV. More>>
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Ford Fiesta Mk 1  

Ford Fiesta Mk 1

1976 - 1983
By 1978 the Fiesta had proven extremely popular, and it seemed a good time for Ford to release a 'hot' version. This came in the form of a 1300, available in 'S' or Ghia versions, powered by a special five-bearing transverse pushrod OHV engine derived from the Escort Sport/Ghia. More>>
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Ford Granada  

Ford Granada Mark 2

1977 - 1985
The most striking change on the Mark 2 Granada was the bodyshell which, like the Cortina, was given a lower bonnet line and a greater glass area. The nose section was elongated, helping to eliminate the blunt look of the old Granada, and making the new model far more elegant. More>>
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Ford Colani GT80  

Ford Colani GT80

1979 - 1980
During the decade that was the 1970s, Colani built several full scale models and mock-ups of C-Form wing cars. The Colani GT80 prototype unveiled at the Frankfurt show in 1980 was the result of these many years of aerodynamic study and development. In 1973 the first 1:1 mock-up model of this very advanced project was ready at Colani's studio at his Harkotten water-castle near Munster, Germany. More>>
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Ford Sierra

Ford Sierra

1982 - 1993
One of the most important events in the automobile industry in 1982 was, without doubt, the announcement of the Sierra, the car that replaced Ford's best-selling Cortina/Taunus model. Released on 21st September 1982, the Sierra was designed by Uwe Bahnsen, Robert Lutz and Patrick le Quément. The code used during development was "Project Toni". More>>
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Ford Scorpio

Ford Granada Mark 3 / Scorpio

1985 - 1994
When Ford’s European HQ set about designing their mid 1980s generation of flagship passenger cars, they made a deliberate effort at achieving a more externally compact car than the previous Granada model. It seemed that the maximum practical width for a European car had been reached, or even exceeded, and it was time to start trimming back the body without sacrificing passenger accommodation. More>>
Ford USA Road Tests and Reviews
Ford Model T  

Ford Model T

1908 - 1927
Ask most people to name a vintage car, and the answer will invariably be “The Model T”. With over 15 million being manufactured in the USA, South Africa, Canada and Australia, it is widely regarded not only as the car that “put the nation on wheels”, but the car that put the world on wheels. More>>
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Ford Model A  

Ford Model A

1927 - 1931
The Model A Ford was the successor to the popular Model T, it first being released to the public on December 2nd, 1927. Ford desperately needed the Model A, with sales of the once popular Model T having been in decline for several years. More>>
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Ford Model B / Model 18 / Ford V8  

Ford Model B / Model 18 / Ford V8

1932 - 1934
Unlike the Model T that had enjoyed a near 20 year production run, Ford knew that to retain market share, they would have to turn models over regularly as did their competitors. And so the Model A was replaced in 1932 by the Model B, carrying over the 4L engine layout however offering some minor refinements. More>>
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Ford Customline  

Ford Customline

1952 - 1956
Immediately following the war most manufacturers, understandably, continued with the manufacture of designs dating back to the previous decade. Ford’s first and much anticipated new model line up arrived in 1949, however the 1952 revision, while based heavily on the 1949 design, heralded a new design direction. More>>
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Ford Thunderbird  

Ford Thunderbird

1955 - 1957
Although it does not look like a sporty 2 door car, the Thunderbird was in fact designed to counter GM's Chev Corvette. More>>
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Ford Crown Victoria  

Ford Crown Victoria

1955 -
Gaining notorioty recently for all the wrong reasons, the perennial Crown Victoria has lineage dating back to 1955. Today however it is best known as a police vehicle, accounting for over 90% of the police fleet in the US and Canada. More>>
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Ford Fairlane 500  

Ford Fairlane 500

1956 - 1959
The beauty of any big American car of the era was its ability to soak up the miles effortlessly, and at the end of a long trip there were none better able to deliver both driver and passenger free of fatigue and in such great comfort. More>>
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Ford Fairlane 500 "Skyliner"  

Ford Fairlane 500 "Skyliner"

1956 - 1959
As there were less than 13,000 of the vehicles made, these cars are today seen as being highly collectable - if you are lucky enough to find one! More>>
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Ford Ranchero  

Ford Ranchero

1957 - 1979
The Ranchero, the first US designed "Ute", was an ever popular model in the Ford line-up - its popularity ensuring it would enjoy a longevity spanning 23 years, from 1957 through 1979. Naturally during this time the vehicle underwent several significant revisions, with the last model bearing no resemblance to the first - however in all versions the car remained exceedingly popular, with some 508,000 vehicles manufactured. More>>
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Ford Galaxie  

Ford Galaxie

1961 - 1964
Although first introduced in 1959, it was the sleek models of the 1960's that presented an all-new style, abandoning the ostentatious ornamentation of the 50s for a futuristic, sleek look. It was obvious that Ford's stylists were abandoning the aviation influences of the previous decade and instead capturing the new obsession - the space race. More>>
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Ford Falcon V8 Sprint  

Ford Falcon Sprint

1963 - 1965
The Ford Falcon Sprint first came into prominence at the beginning of 1963 at the time of the Monte Carlo Rally, which it narrowly missed winning. The rally cars were hardtop coupes, specially prepared and tuned, although a little more attention to the durability of the suspension components should have been made to the Aussie design (for more on this, read the Ford Falcon Story). More>>
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Ford GT40  

Ford GT40

1964 - 1966
The story of the GT40 goes back to the early 1960s, when Henry Ford was negotiating to buy Ferrari. His offer was rejected by Enzo Ferrari in last minute negotiations, and in retaliation Henry set about building a Ford able to dominate racing and beat the Ferrari teams. More>>
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Ford Bronco  

Ford Bronco

1966 - 1996
From the ground up, the Australian assembled Bronco had specifications and equipment levels equal to or better than the competition. Only aesthetic areas remained open for criticism which seemed to polarise opinions – some loved it, some hated it. The team here at Unique Cars and Parts fall into the first category, considering it a neat example of U.S. styling that carried with it a continuation of the Ford world-wide grill and headlight treatment. More>>
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1968  Ford Torino  

Ford Torino 1968

1968
Ford made it hard for the competition with their formidable line-up of the ‘60s. Much is said about the Mustang, but there was another in the stable that was utterly brilliant. A true muscle car in every sense of the word, the 1968 Torino took the fight up to just about everything. As delivered from the factory, the Torino was a quality vehicle. More>>
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Ford Granada / Mercury Monarch  

Ford Granada / Mercury Monarch

1975 - 1980
Ford USA's Granada-Monarch (Ford and Mercury versions respectively) were originally conceived as a replacement for “compact” Maverick. Ford looked at importing the European Granada instead of designing a completely new car, but the cost of "federalizing" the German vehicle was prohibitive. And it was during the design of the Granada that it became a totally new car both in concept and execution. More>>
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Ford Courier  

Ford Courier

1977 - 1985
The Courier was powered by Mazda's well known but noisy 1.8 litre ohc four cylinder, which endowed the 1145kg vehicle with respectable un-laden performance. Standard kit on the XLT was the column mounted 4 speed gearbox, which had the added advantage of allowing you to travel 3 up in the front – although you would have wanted to be very good friends as it was a considerable squeeze. More>>
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Ford Taurus

Ford Taurus (Gen #1)

1986 - 1991
Things can change quickly in the automobile business. In 1980, Ford's US. operation was losing a record $1 billion a year attempting to sell a line of products that were outdated and dull. In comparison, the competition had showrooms filled with high-tech, front wheel drive cars designed for the eighties. Ford was still cranking out rear-wheel drives styled for the seventies. Although Ford's European operation was healthy and dynamic, the US. company was in serious trouble. More>>
Ford Mustang 1st Generation Road Tests and Reviews
1964 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1964

1964 ½
The date was April 17th, 1964. Intermediate sized muscle cars, with big block engines were gradually replacing the full sized muscle car. Lee Iacocca, Ford's General Manager, had always envisioned a small sports car to be the next hot item in the street wars. More>>
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1965 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1965

1965
The Ford Mustang debuted as a simple sports car powered by a 170 cid six cylinder and a pair of V8's. Originally named for the fighter plane, the P-51 Mustang, preliminary allusions were made to the horse, and the horse motif quickly became the emblem for the Mustang. More>>
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1966 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1966

1966
1966 saw further refinement of the Mustang. The gauge cluster was redone to seperate the Mustang from its Falcon roots while the 260 cid V8 was replaced with 2 and 4 barrel versions of the 289 cid V8. More>>
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1967 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1967

1967
1967 saw a massive restyle of the Ford Mustang. Changes included bulkier sheet metal below the beltline, a more aggressive grill, a concave tail panel, and a full fastback roofline for the fastback body style. More>>
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1968 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1968

1968
The 1968 Ford Mustang received a simpler grill, side trim and a limited number of 427 engines were slipped into the engine bays. These 427 engines were slightly detuned but still cranked out 390bhp, enough to strike fear on the streets. More>>
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1969 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1969

1969
The Mustang was restyled for 1969, gaining 3.8 inches of length, all ahead of the front wheels, and about 140lbs in curb weight. More>>
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1970 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1970

1970
Both the Boss 302 and 429 continued into 1970. The 428 Cobra Jet continued as the top engine choice for the Mach 1 Mustang. New for 1970 was the 429 Cobra Jet, standard in the Boss 429. More>>
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1971 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1971

1971
Ford's decade of "Total Performance" was drawing to a close. The Mustang grew by 2.1" in length, 2.8" of width, 1" of wheelbase, and about 100 lbs. Coupled with this weight gain was the disappearance of the Shelby models, the Boss 302 and Boss 429 models. More>>
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1972 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1972

1972
Following industry lead, all power ratings for 1972 and later were listed in net ratings which included all accessories. This lead to some drastic drops in power listings which, coupled with the drop of all big block options, sealed the end of Ford Mustang performance. More>>
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1973 Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang 1973

1973
All engine choices and power ratings dropped once again as emission controls tightened. New federal guidelines resulted in mandatory bumpers that could withstand a 5mph collision, all of which didn't help the bloated body styling. More>>
Ford Mustang 2nd Generation Road Tests and Reviews
1974 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1974

1974
Answering the call for a lighter, more nimble Mustang, Ford's Lee Iacocca, dictated that the new Mustang, officially called the Mustang II, which debuted in 1974 would be light, sporty, and more European. Iacocca wanted it to be "a little jewel" and this direction drove every aspect of the new design. More>>
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1975 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1975

1975
The biggest boost for the Mustang II's image was the introduction of the 302 cubic inch V8 back to the Mustang option list. Available in any Mustang II, but only with an automatic transmission, the V8 was topped by a two-barrel Autolite carburettor and was rated at 134 bhp. More>>
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1976 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1976

1976
Catalytic converters were made standard on all Mustang IIs for 1976 as Federal emission laws were further tightened. More>>
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1977 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1977

1977
The only change for 1977 was that production of the Cobra II option was now done in-house by Ford. More>>
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1978 Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang 1978

1978
1978 saw the introduction of the King Cobra Mustang II. The King Cobra package was offered only with the four-speed manual transmission and featured a better suspension with front and rear stabilizer bars, the 302 V8 with a Variable Venturi Carburettor, Goodyear P195/70R13 radial tyres, and a wild paint and graphics appearance package. More>>
Ford Mustang 3rd Generation Road Tests and Reviews
1979 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1979

1979
1979 saw the debut of the new Mustang (the "II" was dropped) based on the new Fox platform. More>>
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1980 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1980

1980
For 1980, the Cobra option now included the Recaro seats. But this couldn't make up for the loss under the hood. More>>
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1981 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1981

1981
The 2.8 litre V6 was dropped for 1981, with the 3.3 litre V6 receiving a slight boost in power up to 91 bhp. More>>
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1982 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1982

1982
Performance fans finally were rewarded in 1982 with the reintroduction of the beloved 302 V8, now named the 5.0 litre HO (High Output) and rated at a decent 157 bhp. More>>
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1983 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1983

1983
The convertible finally returned for 1983. All Mustangs also received a redesigned grille and taillights. In addition, engine choices were shuffled up, mainly for the better. The 3.3 I6 was dropped, and replaced with a new 3.8 litre V6 rated at 112 bhp. More>>
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1984 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1984

1984
To mark the 20th anniversary of the Mustang, Ford released a special Twentieth Anniversary GT model. This featured a GT350 badge were it had been 19 years before. Unfortunately, although Carrol Shelby had licensed the Cobra name to Ford, the GT350 and GT500 names were not licensed. Ford had to discontinue using the GT350 name, making this a one year only model. More>>
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1985 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1985

1985
The big news for 1985 was improvements to the 5.0 litre V8 H.O. The engine received true dual exhausts, and 1960s era stainless steel tube headers. Along with a longer duration lift cam and hydraulic roller valve lifters, power output increased to a respectable 210 bhp. More>>
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1986 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1986

1986
The regular turbocharged Inline 4 was dropped for 1986, while the SVO engine was slightly detuned for 1986, its last year, to meet the requirements of lower octane gas. More>>
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1987 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1987

1987
Although the SVO Mustangs were gone, a lot of their parts found their way to lesser Mustangs. All Mustangs received the SVO drooped nose, and thus all radiator breathing was from under the front bumper. More>>
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1988 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1988

1988
The T-Top option was dropped for 1988 as the only change. More>>
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1989 Ford Mustang  

 

Ford Mustang 1989

1989
There were no changes for the 1989 Mustang. More>>
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1990 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1990

1990
For 1990, all Mustangs received a new 140 mph speedometer to replace the previous 85 mph unit. In addition, Ford created a special run of 2,000 Emerald Green GT Convertibles with white leather interiors that it refered to as the Limited Edition Twenty-Fifth Anniversary model, (evidently forgeting that the Mustang's 25th anniversary was in 1989). More>>
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1991 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1991

1991
Sales dropped again in 1991 as prices for the base Mustang rose past US$10,000.00. More>>
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1992 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1992

1992
A new special edition Mustang GT in Red with a white leather interior was introduced for 1992. A total of 2,196 were sold. More>>
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1993 Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang 1993

1993
Finally, a new Cobra model was introduced mid-year with its 5.0 litre V8 tweaked to 235 bhp, while changes to the SAE rating method dropped the regular 5.0 V8 to 200 bhp. The Cobra was produced by Ford's Special Vehicles Team (SVT) which had taken over the functions of the former SVO group. More>>
Ford Mustang 4th Generation Road Tests and Reviews
1994 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1994

1994
There are many stories about the long-awaited arrival of the Ford Mustang. Major U.S. daily newspapers, news magazines and several overseas journals carried "exclusive" features detailing the newest entry in the Detroit sweepstakes. It has been estimated that nearly 30 million television viewers witnessed the unveiling on April 16th and, on the day of the launch at the New York World's Fair, over 2,500 newspapers ran advertisements. More>>
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1995 Ford Mustang  

Ford Mustang 1995

1995
There are many stories about the long-awaited arrival of the Ford Mustang. Major U.S. daily newspapers, news magazines and several overseas journals carried "exclusive" features detailing the newest entry in the Detroit sweepstakes. It has been estimated that nearly 30 million television viewers witnessed the unveiling on April 16th and, on the day of the launch at the New York World's Fair, over 2,500 newspapers ran advertisements. More>>
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1996 Ford Mustang

Ford Mustang 1996

1996
There are many stories about the long-awaited arrival of the Ford Mustang. Major U.S. daily newspapers, news magazines and several overseas journals carried "exclusive" features detailing the newest entry in the Detroit sweepstakes. It has been estimated that nearly 30 million television viewers witnessed the unveiling on April 16th and, on the day of the launch at the New York World's Fair, over 2,500 newspapers ran advertisements. More>>
Frazer-Nash Road Tests and Reviews
Frazer-Nash Le Mans Replica

Frazer-Nash Le Mans Replica

1959 - 1988
The marque Frazer-Nash is popularly regarded as being thoroughly British, but after World War 2 the cars displayed a good deal of German influence. The 1949 Le Mans replica was the first. More>>
GAZ Road Tests and Reviews
GAZ Chaika 13  

GAZ Chaika 13 and 14

1959 - 1988
IN A free from competition market like the USSR used to be, every model was planned to fill a certain niche. There was no need to replace a design for marque prestige alone. Hence the Gorky Automobile Factory's flagship GAZ-13 Chaika (the seagull), first built in 1959, remained in production for years longer than any similar car would have in the West. More>>
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GAZ M21 Volga Sedan
 

GAZ M21 Volga Sedan

1956 - 1970
Making the M21 Volga individualistic was the high waisted style, even though many design elements from contemporary US cars seemed to be present. More important than any perceived similarities however was that the new Volga be more adept at handling the unforgiving roads and climate in which it would operate. More>>
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GAZ M22 Volga Estate  

GAZ M22 Volga Estate

1962 - 1970
Six years after the introduction of the GAZ M21 Saloon came the M22 Estate (station wagon) version, which remained in production from 1962 to 1970. Best known of these was the 5 door M22D "Universal", which entered service in the Soviet Union as an ambulance. More>>
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GAZ M24 Volga

GAZ M24 Volga

1970 - 1992
The replacement to the M21, the all new M24 Volga entered limited production in 1968. The new model would spawn other unique models, such as the 1973/1974 experimental GAZ 24-95, which featured an all-wheel-drive system, although only 5 were ever produced, one being proudly owned by Soviet leader Leonid Illich Brezhnev. More>>
Ginetta Road Tests and Reviews
Ginetta G21S

Ginetta G21S

1971 - 1978
British Enthusiasts were fortunate in having a handful of small, specialist sports car manufacturers to offer them a more individual, usually higher performance alternative to the relatively mundane, massed-produced sports cars of (mainly) British Leyland origin. Like Australian buyers of the Purvis Eureka, many referred to the "kit cars" as "Poor men's Porsches". More>>
Glas Goggomobil Road Tests and Reviews
Glas Goggomobil  

Glas Goggomobil

1955 - 1965
German manufacturing company Glas made the Goggomobil T300 from 1955-67 and T400 from '55 to 69. More>>
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Glas Goggomobil Dart  

Glas Goggomobil Dart

1955 - 1965
When German Production of the Goggomobil ceased in 1969, Sydney man Bill Buckle began importing the rolling chassis from Germany and fitting his own fibreglass bodies. More>>
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Glas 2600 V8

Glas 2600 V8

1966 - 1968
One of the lesser known models to come from Glas was the 2600 V8 Coupe. The car was the design of Pietro Frua, who had already penned such great looking automobiles as the Maserati GT350 and the first-generation Quattroporte before being comissioned by Glas to complete the 2600. More>>
Heinkel Road Tests and Reviews
Heinkel Kabine

Heinkel Kabine

1956 - 1958
When aircraft designer Ernst Heinkel saw the BMW manufactured Iso Isetta, he decided that he could do one better, using aircraft principles and making it lighter and faster by using a smaller engine. More>>
Hillman Road Tests and Reviews
Hillman Minx  

Hillman Minx

1932 - 1970
The Raymond Loewy design organisation developed the Audax body style for the Rootes group, after their success with Studebaker coupes in 1953. The sedan version was launched in 1956, while the Estate followed the release of the popular Humber Hawk saloon mid 1957. More>>
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Hillman Husky  

Hillman Husky

1954 - 1970
Despite its looks, the Husky was not a hatchback. Instead, the designers incorporated a single side-hinged rear door. The Mark VIII Minx DeLuxe sedan, convertible and "Californian" hardtop used a then new OHV 1390cc engine, while the Husky continued to use the older 1265cc 35 bhp (26 kW) sidevalve engine with single Zenith carburettor which it shared with the Minx "Special" sedan and wagon. More>>
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Hillman Minx Audax Series  

Hillman Minx Audax Series I - VI

1956 - 1967
Rootes' development engineers were always working to improve the consumption of the 1,725 c.c. Minx engine fitted to the Series VI. Obviously wind has a greater effect on lighter and less powerful cars, and in the case of the Minx the acceleration figures of 50-70 m.p.h. in third gear would take the engine well over its power peak so that, especially into wind, the car would take an unrealistically long time to reach 70 m.p.h. More>>
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Hillman Super Minx  

Hillman Super Minx

1961 - 1967
Announced in October 1961, the Super Minx gave Rootes, and particularly its Hillman marque, an expanded presence in the upper reaches of the family car market. It has been suggested that the Super Minx design was originally intended to replace, and not merely to supplement, the standard Minx, but was found to be too big for that purpose. More>>
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Hillman Imp  

Hillman Imp

1963 - 1976
The Hillman Imp was the first mass-produced British car to have the engine in the back, and the first to use a light aluminium alloy die-cast engine. More>>
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Hillman Arrow  

Hillman Arrow/Hunter

1966 - 1979
First introduced into Australia as the "Arrow", the Hunter was a conventional design, square four-door sedan (and later estate) with a live rear axle and ohv engine (initially 1725cc with a 1496cc in 1970). More>>
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Hillman Master Hunter

Hillman Master Hunter

1967 - 1969
For those living in the UK and not satisfied with the performance on offer from the stock Hillman Hunter, from Davenport Vernon, then Rootes main dealers at London Road, came a rather more sporting iteration - the "Master Hunter". More>>
Hindustan Road Tests and Reviews
Hindustan Ambassador

Hindustan Ambassador

1959 -
The majority of Ambassadors on Indian roads feature drum brakes, unassisted steering and tyres with tubes - hardly features that a classic car collector would be looking for but surely making this car very unique! (and dangerous?) More>>
Hispano-Suiza Road Tests and Reviews
Hispano-Suiza H6

Hispano-Suiza H6

1919 - 1934
The Hispano-Suiza H6 was was arguably the pinnacle of the manufacturers endeavours.  Available since 1919, it would remain in production for over a decade and remained, during a time of unparalleled automotive advances, amazingly up to date, even if those in quest of the ultimate opted for the 'stretched' eight-litre 46 CV, a mere stripling launched in 1923. More>>
Holden Camira and Piazza Road Tests and Reviews
Camira JB  

Holden Camira JB

1982 - 1984
Manufactured in Australia by Holden, the Camira was designed by Opel and used an international parts bin that included an Isuzu dash and transmission. Apart from these few items, the Camira was largely built from Australian components, and boasted more local content than the (VL) Commodore of the day. More>>
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Camira JD  

Holden Camira JD

1984 - 1987
The big news for lovers of Holdens Camira came in 1984 with the release of the "JD" model and the introduction of the all new fuel injected 1.8 litre Family II engine. The new motor became standard on all models except the SL. More>>
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Camira JE  

Holden Camira JE

1987 - 1989
The Camira was soon to suffer the same fate as the Gemini. During the mid to late 80's the then Federal Minister for Trade and Industry John Button was restructuring the local motor industry, and this involved local manufacturers sharing models. More>>
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Holden Piazza

Holden Rodeo KB

1981 - 1988
The original Holden Rodeo, the KB, went on sale in Australia in February 1981 – and in doing so scored two 'firsts' for General Motors-Holden's Ltd. It was the first vehicle to bear the Holden name to be built outside Australia, and it was the first four wheel drive vehicle to be marketed as a Holden. More>>
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Holden Piazza

Holden Piazza YB

1986 - 1987
Despite the bravado of the Italian design, under the skin lurked a thoroughly conventional small Japanese sedan with double-wishbone front suspension, five link live-axle rear suspension and four-wheel disc brakes. More>>
Holden Commodore Road Tests and Reviews
Commodore VB  

Holden Commodore VB

1978 - 1980
The VB Commodore of 1978 was to replace the aging HZ model, an update of the model line first introduced with the HQ Holden in 1971. The base level Commodore came with the 2.8 ltr. 6 cylinder motor coupled to a 4-speed manual transmission. Engine options available at the time of introduction included the 3.3 ltr. 6 cyl. and 4.2 ltr. V8 engines. You could also upgrade to a Tri-Matic auto, corded cloth interior, power steering and air-conditioning. More>>
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Commodore VC  

Holden Commodore VC

1980 - 1981
A model update from the VB, the VC's main improvement was the introduction of the "Blue" engines (the "Red" motors being carried over to the previous model VB from the Kingswood). The VB's slat grill was replaced with a "crate" style grill on the VC, and unlike the VB it was attached to the front structure of the vehicle instead of the bonnet. More>>
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Commodore VH  

Holden Commodore VH

1981 - 1984
The VH was the third Commodore series in four years, with five engines and, for the first time, a five-speed gearbox. The transition from VB to VC and then VH was one of evolution rather than revolution, and so many knew the bugs had well and truly been ironed out by the time the VH arrived. Naturally any model change required some form of cosmetic change, Holden opting for a subtle reworking at the front giving the VH Commodore a longer and lower appearance. More>>
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Commodore VK  

Holden Commodore VK

1984 - 1986
The VK Commodore represented the first major change to the Commodore since the release of the VB in 1978. Sporting an all new and more agressive look than the previous models, the additional side windows helped make the VK look longer, and by reworking the rubber seals the GMH engineers were able to give the VK a squarer, more prominent look. The inside was to come in for a substantial makeover too, although the newly squared-off design of the instruments was not to everyones liking. More>>
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Commodore VL  

Holden Commodore VL

1986 - 1988
The VL Commodore represented a substantial makeover of the VK, and would be the last of the "compact" Commodores. The engineers sought to soften the lines of the VL, rounding off the panels and introducing a small tail spoiler built into the boot lid. To all that saw it, the VL looked vastly more modern than the previous models, but there was one major concern for the Holden faithful, the 6 cylinder red engine that had received such a comprehensive makeover for the VK was completely dropped in favour of an imported Nissan 3 litre straight six unit. More>>
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Commodore VL Turbo  

Holden Commodore VL Turbo

1986 - 1988
One of the hottest Holden’s ever to roll off the production line at Fishermens Bend was not a V8. And the engine was not American or Australian. But it was every bit as quick as a 350 Monaro GTS; as fast as a Torana A9X. And in stock form it was right up there with all but the best from Peter Brock’s HDT Vehicles Division. More>>
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Commodore VN  

Holden Commodore VN

1988 - 1991
Launching the VN Commodore, Holden said the totally new car had been designed to achieve the dramatic market impact reserved only for the most historic and significant Holden models. And so it proved. There were a few VL Commodore components still under the skin, but the new VN had been stretched - in every important dimension. More>>
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Holden VQ Statesman and Caprice  

Holden VQ Statesman and Caprice

1990 - 1994
The VQ Statesman and Caprice models were more than just another car for Holden; they represented a big technological step forward and a return to the luxury car market - a market Holden handed to Ford six years earlier when the WB Statesman was scrapped. While the Statesman was more than just a luxury car, it was also much more than a stretched VN Commodore. More>>
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Commodore VP  

Holden Commodore VP

1991 - 1993
The VP was always going to be a face-lifted VN, however there were considerable and detailed improvements made over the latter model. Independent Rear Suspension (IRS) was introduced, fitted as standard equipment on the Calais and Commodore SS and optional across the range, the system being adapted from the long wheelbase VQ. More>>
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Commodore VR  

Holden Commodore VR

1993 - 1995
The VR Series was the first Australian built car to offer a driver's airbag. The introduction of the airbag, plus webbing clamps on the front seats and a lap/sash belt for the centre rear passenger, made the VR the safest Holden ever. More>>
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Commodore VS  

Holden Commodore VS

1995 - 1997
The major improvements with the VS are the introduction of the ECOTEC 3800 V6, and a passenger airbag. The ECOTEC (Emissions and Consumption Optimisation TEChnology) V6 is more powerful, more economic, produces less emissions, quieter and smoother than the previous 3800 V6. More>>
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Commodore VT  

Holden Commodore VT

1997 - 2000
The VT is a completely new model, like the VB in 1978 and the VN in 1988. Taking the 1995 Opel Omega GM2800 platform and redesigning it to suit, the Commodore was now both wider and longer - and subsequently stronger. There is more front and rear leg room, and more shoulder room. Boot capacity is up by 26%. More>>
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Commodore VX  

Holden Commodore VX

2000 - 2002
The VX, while looking very similar to the VT, has some significant improvements. The V6 has been upgraded, and now puts out 152 kW @ 5200 rpm and has improved fuel efficiency. This is due to upgraded engine management system which now allows individual spark control on each cylinder, and a new inlet manifold. The V8 has also been upgraded and now boasts 225 kW @ 5200 rpm. More>>
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Commodore VY

Holden Commodore VY

2002 - 2004
The VY represents another large investment by Holden, with refinements to body structure, powertrain and chassis dynamics delivering appreciable improvements in performance, ride, handling, safety and build quality. A new model has been introduced, the SV8, which slots in below the SS. More>>
Holden Gemini Road Tests and Reviews
Gemini TX  

Holden Gemini TX

1975 - 1977
In 1975 GMH began the manufacture of the Gemini in Australia, and within a year of its release the little Gemini had become the most popular car on the market (no doubt helped by the low price tag and its being named Australian Car of the Year). More>>

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Holden Gemini TC

1977 - 1978
The new model TC was, as could be expected after only 2 years, merely a facelift of the old model, however Holden decided to introduce some important handling options, such as a front stabilizer bar and steel belted radial tyres. The drive train however remained unchanged. More>>
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Gemini TD  

Holden Gemini TD

1978 - 1979
The most noticeable visual change was the introduction of more attractive and up-market looking square headlights. The grille was, as always, changed again and now the little Gemini incorporated RTS (Radial Tuned Suspension) which was much heralded in its big brother, the Holden HZ. More>>
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Gemini TE  

Holden Gemini TE

1979 - 1982
The Gemini had now spanned the casm between the traditional large Holden HZ to the new smaller Commodore VB, and the styling changes reflected Holdens new visual identity, with the TE looking very much the little brother to the VB. More>>
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Gemini TF  

Holden Gemini TF

1982 - 1983
Seven years since the introduction of the Gemini and it was time yeat again for another face lift. It was no surprise to learn that the new model TF had a raft of appointment upgrades over the old model, but there were to be very few mechanical upgrades. More>>
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Gemini TG  

Holden Gemini TG

1983 - 1985
Picking a TF from the previous TG can prove difficult, as most improvements were simply by way of upgrades, such as standardising all models with the more upmarket SL/X seats, and each model (except the base model) receiving the previous models higher spec wheel trims. More>>
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Gemini RB

Holden Gemini RB

1985 - 1987
With the competition selling hatchbacks by the dozen, and the Gemini now only available in sedan form, GMH actively marketed the LB Astra hatch - which in it'self was another nail in the Gemini's coffin. More>>
Holden HDT Special Vehicles Road Tests and Reviews
HDT VC Brock Commodore  

HDT VC Brock Commodore

1980 - 1981
The HDT VC’s were rather gregarious, but that was more fashion of the time, if you were hot, show it. A huge air-dam was fitted to the front, while the back featured a large three piece spoiler, fat wheel flares and bold striping in red, white or black, stretching from the front spoiler and continuing along the flanks of the car. More>>
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HDT VH Brock Commodore  

HDT VH Brock Commodore

1982 - 1984
First shown as a prototype at the 1982 Melbourne Motor Show, the Brock VH HDT Special Vehicles would prove popular before it was even released. Impatient buyers were going to their respective Holden dealerships to put down a deposit long before the car was even available. Unlike the VC iteration, the VH came in four distinct models, the Commodore SS Group One 4.2 V8, Group Two 4.2 V8, Group Three 4.2 V8 and Group Three 5.0 litre V8. As you progressed through the models, each would receive a little more by way of modification and refinement. More>>
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HDT VK Brock Commodore  

HDT VK Brock Commodore

1984 - 1986
The HDT SS carried over the same grille from the donor VK Commodore, but had a small rear spoiler and 15x7 HDT wheels shod with Uniroyal ER60H15 tyres fitted. But it was the Group Three that was creating all the interest, with its additional air dam, bolder side skirts, rear under-tray, letterbox grille and larger rear spoiler. A rearward facing bonnet spoiler and bonnet wind splitters that ran atop the front guards were popular options. Colour options were restricted to either silver or white, the previous black never proving popular but we cannot determine just why red was abandoned. More>>
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HDT VL Brock Commodore

HDT VL Brock Commodore

1984 - 1986
The first of the HDT Special Vehicles Commodore's for the VL range would be the Calais LE. Initially it was powered by the same engine as the donor car, the Nissan sourced 6 cylinder engine being used. Naturally, as other engines became available on the general Commodore range the HDT engineers were quick to use these for their cars, and so both the turbo-six and Holden 5.0 litre V8 would also find their way under the bonnet of the Brock VL. More>>
HSV Road Tests and Reviews
HSV Walkinshaw VL  

HSV Walkinshaw VL

1988 - 1989
The Walkinshaw Commodore was at first rather difficult to sell. For starters, it was not a “Brock Commodore”, and the price was almost as over the top as the gregarious body kit. Holden had undeniably got it wrong, deciding that instead of producing the required 500 units they would instead produce 750. Meanwhile HSV set about creating a more sedate Calais SV88 model, which was released in April 1988. More>>
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HSV VN Series  

HSV VN Series

1988 - 1991
The first of the HSV’s for the VN series Commodore was, however, not particularly special. The SV3800 was released in October 1988, the name indicating the size of the new V6 carried over from the donor car. The HSV body kit certainly gave the car a more sporting appearance, and suspension mods firmed up the handling and steering. More>>
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HSV VP Series  

HSV VP Series

1991 - 1993
There wasn’t much to separate the VP over the outgoing VN, cosmetically anyway. But that would selling the VP short. HSV were quick to incorporate IRS and other Holden improvements into it’s own range. The VP would see HSV clock up their 5000th vehicle, and only two years later with the same model their 8000th, the latter marked by the release of 138 special edition 5th Anniversary models – each painted in Galaxy Blue over Panorama Silver. More>>
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HSV VR Series  

HSV VR Series

1993 - 1995
The new model HSV displayed bolder lines than its predecessors, courtesy of a beautifully proportioned body kit which featured a specially designed bumper incorporating large central air intake flanked by smaller cooling slots for brake cooling. You could now option your Club Sport with a 185kW version of the ever reliable 5.0 litre V8; among the enhancements were a recalibrated GM-Delco engine management system linked to a Bosch electronic ignition, a cold air box fed denser air to the system and reworked exhaust headers designed to reduce back pressure. More>>
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HSV VR Series

HSV VS Series

1995 - 1997
With each successive model change in the HSV line-up, the aspirant’s vehicle of choice had been edging little by little out of the financial reach of most. Remembering the quote from John Harvey with the release of the VP Club Sport, that HSV wanted to create a performance vehicle within the range of “Mr. Joe Average” (although any HSV is anything but average), so begat the new entry level Manta sedan and wagons. More>>
Holden Monaro Road Tests and Reviews
HK Monaro  

Holden HK Monaro

1968 - 1969
The sleek, pillarless two-door was introduced six months after the rest of the range and soon took pride of place in Holden dealer showrooms across the country. Its 'boy racer' appeal was universal - a tribute to the foresight of the then Managing Director of GM-H, Max Wilson. More>>
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HT Monaro  

Holden HT Monaro

1969 - 1970
The HT Monaro upgrade exhibited even more of the self-assured and extroverted attitude of the people who choose to drive it. Most dramatic change was a new multi-louvred plastic grille with a raised centre section and Monaro black-outs. More>>
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HG Monaro  

Holden HG Monaro

1970 - 1971
Regarded as the most sophisticated of the early Monaro models, the HG is today one of the rarest and most sought-after of the charismatic Holden coupes. More>>
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HQ Monaro  

Holden HQ Monaro

1971 - 1974
With the HQ series, Holden's design, engineering and manufacturing team delivered the definitive Australian car - new from the ground up and embracing the best of US and European trends. More>>
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HQ Monaro  

Holden HQ Monaro GTS 4 door

1973 - 1974
Inevitably, the trendsetting two-door Monaro had such a strong influence on the rest of the Holden range that sedans took on a similarly sleek look. The process began with the HT sedan's 'faster' roofline and became more apparent with the arrival of the fluid HQ. More>>
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HJ Monaro  

Holden HJ Monaro

1974 - 1976
As a rush of new European models entered the market and Australians were presented with a wider range of choices in general, the HJ Monaro upgrade had to satisfy a more demanding enthusiast buyer. More>>
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HX Monaro  

Holden HX Monaro

1976
The HX arrived in July 1976 as the Australian automotive industry concentrated on meeting new anti-pollution requirements. There was no Monaro coupe in the new HX line-up, but the name was emblazoned on a single, extroverted GTS four door. More>>
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HX Monaro LE  

Holden HX LE Coupe

1976
This final coupe was exceptional and exclusive enough to ensure that the original Monaro concept had an appropriate send-off. Although the limited edition LE coupe did not carry the Monaro nameplate, Holden fans regard it as a true blue member of the breed. The LE arrived in August 1976, almost two months after the HX series release. More>>
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HZ Monaro  

Holden HZ GTS Sedan

1977 - 1979
All cars in the HZ lineup brought remarkable advances in ride and handling with the introduction of Radial Tuned Suspension, delivering a Holden that tamed local road conditions better than any before it and handled the twisty bits with European-style competence. The flagship in the Holden lineup was the GTS Sports Sedan. More >>
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V2 Monaro  

Holden V2 Monaro

2001 - 2004
First seen at the Sydney International Motor Show as a design concept in 1998, the stunning Monaro coupe would make it to production, the first example rolling off the assembly line in October, 2001 - a transition that would take only 22 months. More >>
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CV8-R Monaro  

Holden CV8-R Monaro

2003 - 2004
Any classic car collector will tell you the rarer the car, the more quickly it will appreciate. It may be a few years off, but if you are looking at purchasing a second hand Monaro, the CV8-R would be an astute investment. More >>
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VZ Monaro

Holden VZ Monaro

2004 - 2005
It was always going to be difficult to improve on the magnificent V2 Monaro, but essential to the success of any update would be one ingredient, better performance. And so the VZ Monaro was indeed a better car, if power and torque is the gauge by which any car should be judged. Boasting 260kW and 500Nm, the VZ was, for a time, the most powerful mainstream Holden ever manufactured. More >>
Holden Road Tests and Reviews
Holden FX  

Holden 48/215 (FX)

1948 - 1953
Prime Minister Ben Chifley launched the car 'made in Australia, for Australia' in 1948, and nobody guessed what a runaway success this plain and practical sedan would immediately prove to be. Australians took the Holden straight to their hearts, commencing a love affair that continues to this day. More >>
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Holden FJ  

Holden FJ

1953 - 1956
The FJ came along after five years of producing the 48-215 (FX) and was basically the same car with a few minor alterations to the body. Nevertheless the FJ proved to be such a marketing success that there were waiting lists at every dealer! More >>
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Holden FE  

Holden FE

1956 - 1958
GMH recognised that buyers wanted their cars to be an individual statement about themselves, and so introduced new colour schemes and models - in fact seven distinct models were now available including, in 1957, the introduction of a station wagon (at the time referred to as a "Station Sedan"). More>>
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Holden FC  

Holden FC

1958 - 1960
As with the introduction of the FJ, Holden had learnt that to revise or "facelift" a model half way through its life would maintain interest and therefore sales. And so the FC was simply an improved version of the FE, and following the FX to FJ formula it sported more chrome and a more elegant grille. More>>
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Holden FB  

Holden FB

1960 - 1961
The FB had its engine size increeased from the original 132ci to 138ci which gave it 3kw more but because of the heavier body it was actually slower than the older model. More>>
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Holden EK  

Holden EK

1961 - 1962
The EK was the first Holden to offer an automatic ("hydramatic") transmission as an option on all models. This transmission was imported from America, and was regarded as one of the best available in the world. More>>
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Holden EJ  

Holden EJ

1962 - 1963
The EJ was the last model offered with the popular 'grey motor', which had been in use since the first Holden produced in 1948, albeit with a few refinements. More>>
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Holden EH  

Holden EH

1963 - 1965
Holden Motor Company's greatest seller at the time, this model introduced the new "Red" motors using an oversquare design with a seven bearing crankshaft. They were the first Holden to use hydraulic valve lifters, and external oil pump and oil filter for easier servicing. More>>
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Holden EH Premier  

Holden EH Premier Sedan and Wagon

1963 - 1965
The Premier sedan had a top speed of 96 miles per hour, and the wagon was a little slower at 91.8 m.p.h. Zero to 50 m.p.h. would come up in 9.9 sec. and 10.2 sec. respectively. Those figures were mighty impressive in 1963, and put it into the same league as the Valiants. More>>
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Holden EF  

Holden EF

1965
The original design of the EJ Holden was deemed so dated by Detroit HQ that a major re-work was made, and more attention paid to what the "locals" were desiging. Had that original EJ design made it through untouched, the EF Holden may have become a reality. More>>
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Holden HD  

Holden HD

1965 - 1966
Dubbed 'Holden's Disaster', this model was considered the ugly duckling after the public's acceptance of the EH's shape. More>>
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Holden HR

Holden HR

1966 - 1968
Basically a face-lift of the previous HD model, GM's US stylists redesigned the somewhat unpopular HD shape and came up with one much more appealing to the Australian public. This was reflected in sales, with many more HR's being sold than HD's. More>>
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Holden HR

Holden HR 186S

1966 - 1968
The 186S in “Special” trim had none of the glamor gear of the Falcon GT. There was no tacho, although there were some additional instruments - not beautifully jazzed-up by Stewart Warner and styled into a luxury console as on the Falcon. There were no special seats, accessories or dress-up items. Closer to basics there was no V8 engine, and the gear ratios were not sorted by an engineer with a relief map of Mount Panorama as a starting point. More>>
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Holden HK  

Holden HK

1968 - 1969
The all-new Holden HK was the most ambitious series to date, bringing a large array of additional models and mechanical features - most importantly of which was the imported Chev V8 engine. More>>
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Holden HT  

Holden HT

1969 - 1970
Another year, another facelift. The obligatory revisions to the grille and tail lights were completed, but Holden needed to advertise that there were some 65 major improvements over the previous HK model for the buying public to take notice. More>>
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Holden HT Brougham  

Holden HT Brougham

1969 - 1970
To counter the growing popularity of the Ford Fairlane, the General introduced a lavish luxury "large car", the Brougham. The linage was evident to even the most casual observer, it appearing much like a Premier on steroids. More>>
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Holden HG  

Holden HG

1970 - 1971
The HG Holden was the final refinement of the HK-T series and introduced the Australian- Built, Three speed Tri-Matic automatic transmission to the full size Holden. More>>
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Holden HG Brougham  

Holden HG Brougham

1970 - 1971
The Brougham, with its 111 inch wheelbase, could never hope to match the ride stability and passenger space offered by its competitors. Aware of this, (although not prepared to openly admit it) GMH went to great pains to ensure that the Brougham at least came out ahead in the finish department. More>>
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Holden HQ  

Holden HQ

1971 - 1974
This model was arguably a high point of GMH styling, and an Australian classic. They still proliferate the Australian landscape (an icon of cars that were "built to last") in their various configurations of body styles and engine combinations. More>>
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Holden HQ Sandman  

Holden HQ Sandman

1974 - 1974
After the relaese of the Series II HQ Monaro, Holden took a serious view to making a truly sporty recreational vehicle after the 'sun and surf' youth culture of Australia was starting to take hold. More>>
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Holden HJ  

Holden HJ

1974 - 1976
The facelifted HQ was released as the HJ model in 1974, and while many improvements were made to the vehicle the re-introduction of the "swipe" style speedo immediately dated the interior and was reminiscent of the HK. More>>
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Holden HJ Sandman  

Holden HJ Sandman

1974 - 1976
Released in October 1974, the HJ Sandman followed the lead of the Monaro with the bold blunt front that somehow seemed to suit the van better than the sedan. Once again the Sandman was tricked up with all the GTS options and came equipped with the same decals as the HQ series. More>>
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Holden HX  

Holden HX

1976 - 1977
The HX represented only minor cosmetic changes over the HJ, so much so that the HJ and HX are arguably the hardest pre-Commodore Holden models to tell apart. In fact, the major reason for the release of the HX was so that Holden could comply with the new Australian Design Rule 27a, a rule designed to lower exhaust emissions. More>>
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Holden HX Sandman  

Holden HX Sandman

1976 - 1977
Released in July of '76 the HX Sandman had all the features of the previous model with the major refinement being the steering column mounted windscreen wiper/light dipper switch, however its detoxed engine combinations were a problem as in the Monaro. More>>
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Holden HZ  

Holden HZ

1977 - 1978
Following on from the HX was the last of the line for the traditional large Holden sedans, the wonderful HZ. There was plenty to celebrate with the new model, and the new Radial Tuned Suspension (RTS) created a revolution in Aussie big car design. The fact that all other local car manufacturers were forced to rush handling modifications into their cars proved just how right GMH got it. More>>
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Holden HZ Sandman  

Holden HZ Sandman

1977 - 1978
The HZ was equipped with all the visual, interior and performance features of a loaded GTS sedan. With the suspension finally cured with the addition of the much-vaunted Radial Tuned Suspension (RTS), the Sandman could truly be considered a 'sports' as well as a 'lifestyle' vehicle. More>>
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Holden WB

Holden WB

1980 - 1985
The introduction of the Commodore by GM in Australia as the new "family sedan" left an important segment of its line up floundering, being the ever popular commercial vehicles and the up-market luxury Deville and Caprice. More>>
Holden Torana Road Tests and Reviews
Torana HB  

Holden Torana HB

1967 - 1969
In the early 1960s other car manufacturers began offering motorists a broader range of motor vehicles, particularly smaller more economical and considerably cheaper models - particularly as Australian households became 2 car family's. More>>
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Torana HB SL  

Holden Torana HB SL

1967 - 1969
When the Torana was released the image was very much chiffon lace and sex-in-the-sand-hills thanks to its TV advertising and Press handouts. The Torana was marketed strongly as both "Holden" and "new" from every inch of its hippy line panel-work. GM-H made sure of that and for good reason. More>>
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Torana LC  

Holden Torana LC

1969 - 1972
The HB was replaced by the LC Torana in October 1968. A much better car than its predecessor, it did however share the same floorpan (although on 6 cylinder models the wheelbase was lengthened). More>>
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Torana LC GTR  

Holden Torana LC GTR

1969 - 1971
At just $2778 the two-door only GTR came standard with an Opel floor mounted four-speed box, front disc brakes, heavy duty suspension (firmer springs, shock absorbers and an front anti-roll bar), full instrumentation, striking stylistic details which included louvres on the front fenders, handsome two-piece wheel covers and bold paint colours. More>>
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Torana LC GTR XU-1  

Holden Torana LC GTR XU-1

1970 - 1971
By the time the XU-1 hit the market everyone knew the intent, and no doubt the people over at the blue oval were wondering where the chink was in the XU-1's armour was. They didn't have to look far. As GMH didn't have their own 4 speed transmission, they had to stick with the Opel sourced unit, and its dislike for long hard track work was already well known. More>>
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GTR-X Coupe  

Holden GTR-X Coupe

Never (Initially 1970)
The Torana with the greatest reputation is, unfortunately, one that did not make it into production. Designed during the LC development, but most likely to be released alongside the new LJ models, the GTR-X used a sleek wedge-shaped body running XU-1 components under a fibreglass skin. More>>
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Torana LJ  

Holden Torana LJ & TA

1972 - 1975
The LJ Torana of February 1972 was a facelift of the LC, and offered more refinement with better handling, suspension revisions and greatly improved noise supression. More>>
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Torana LJ GTR  

Holden Torana LJ GTR

1972 - 1974
The LJ versions of the GTR and GTR XU-1's had their engine capacity raised to 202 cubic inches (3300cc). In September 1972, it received a number of refinements including fine-spline rear axles and Globe Sprintmaster wheels. More>>
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Torana LJ GTR XU-1  

Holden Torana LJ GTR XU-1

1972 - 1974
The scene was set for another Holden vs. Ford showdown at the Mount during the 1973 Hardie-Ferodo 1000, and everyone wondered if the XU-1, and Peter Brock, could retain the crown. Many felt the new race distance, extended to 1000 kilometres for the first time, would prove a bigger endurance test for the more tempremental GT's - no doubt many Torana fans hoped so. More>>
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Torana LH  

Holden Torana LH

1974 - 1976
At last Australians could enjoy an Australian designed medium sized car from Holden - the LH Torana. Most agreed it was a big improvement over its predecessor, but was the LH a replacement or a different class of car? Unlike the previous models that owed their heritage to the English Vauxhall (from its entirity in the HB to the chassis in the TA), the LH Torana series could best be described as a scaled down Kingswood. More>>
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Torana LH L34 SL/R5000  

Holden Torana LH L34 SL/R 5000

1974 - 1976
The LH Torana sure looked the part, once and for all dropping any semblance of linage with the Vauxhall Viva's from which it originated. And while the LH was a truley great car, it was the dominance of the GT Falcon at Mount Panorama that many believed drove the General to shoe-horn an all-Aussie V8 under the hood. More>>
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Holden Torana LH SL/R5000 Automatic  

Holden Torana LH SL/R 5000 Automatic

1974 - 1976
In a European vs. Australian comparison, a Mercedes 250 was pitted against an SL/R in highway and freeway conditions. Surprisingly (or should we say, not so suprisingly), the SL/R came out on top, being less affected by cross winds, easier to point at speed and generally more controllable. It seemed the achillies heel was only in the braking department, where the Torana tended to suffer brake fade due to overheating under continued fast stop testing. More>>
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Torana LX  

Holden Torana LX Sedan

1976 - 1978
A facelift of the LH model, the LX is best rembered for two reasons, the introduction of the hatchback and, unfortunately, the last to be fitted with a V8. The hatch was available is SL and SS versions, and in base form cam equipped with a 3300 engine, however you could option the 253 4.2 litre V8, while the 5.0 litre V8 came as standard with the SS. The hatch looked great, however in practical terms the shallow boot did not swallow as much luggage as many thought it should. More>>
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Torana LX Hatch  

Holden Torana LX Hatch

1976 - 1978
To create the free flowing lines, the GM stylists dropped the roofline sharply from approximately six inches behind the thick B-Pillar - and in doing so created a genuine fastback style. The down-side was that the rear roof-height was somewhat compromised, meaning tall passengers would probably have preferred to travel in the back of a standard LX Torana sedan. More>>
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Torana LX A9X  

Holden Torana LX A9X

1977 - 1978
The penultimate Torana, and one of the best ever Australian Muscle Cars, the Torana A9X became an overnight legend. That the Brock Commodore's would take four years to surpass their performance speaks volumes about the car's inate power and roadholding ability. More>>
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Torana UC  

Holden Torana UC

1978 - 1980
The UC was unfortunately the last model in the Torana lineup. The most obvious changes over the previous model LX were in the front end re-styling, which featured a new grille and rectangular headlights. Modifications were also made to the tail-lights and interior, the latter offering increased room and superior appointments. More>>
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Holden Sunbird UC  

Holden UC Sunbird

1978 - 1980
There was no way the Sunbird could ever hope to keep up with the larger engined Torana. Not in a straight line, not even in a corner. The two may have looked identical, but when you were behind the wheel of a Sunbird you knew there was a difference. The Sunbird felt like an underpowered Torana. Not that it was a bad car, but because of its size and the way it felt on the road, the Sunbird, understandably, would always feel like a Torana without any go. More>>
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Holden Hurricane

Holden Hurricane

Never (Initially 1969)
In the late 1960's Holden were at the forefront of experimental car design. Most know of the wonderful GTR-X, but only a handful will truly remember the Hurricane. Unlike the GTR-X, the Hurricane was never really intended to make it into production. Rather, Holden described it as an experimental research vehicle, allowing them "‘to study design trends, propulsion systems and other long range developments". More>>
Honda Road Tests and Reviews
Honda S600  

Honda S600

1963 - 1966
A plaque in the Honda Collection Hall recalls the days when Soichiro Honda went from being a motorcycle manufacturer to a maverick carmaker. "I didn't want to build a car like everyone else's". More>>
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Honda S800  

Honda S800

1965 - 1979
Undercutting the Mini Cooper and Triumph Spitfire in price, the vehicle soon made in-roads into the more traditional British sports car category and the rest was history. More>>
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Honda Scamp  

Honda Scamp

1968 - 1973
The Honda Scamp changed a lot of pre-conceived ideas about mini cars with mini engines – the concept of which had become a little maligned by the likes of the Glas Goggomobil and Lightburn Zeta. More>>
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Honda 600  

Honda Z / Honda 600

1968 - 1973
In Australia, as in Japan, we had two versions of the Honda Z. There was the Honda 360 or Scamp, and the Honda 600. They were pretty much identical, apart from the engine size. More>>
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Honda 1300 Coupe  

Honda 1300 Coupe

1969 - 1973
Superb and incredible. Not our words, but those of motoring journalists after getting behind the wheel of the diminutive front wheel drive air-cooled Japanese Coupe. There were two models of the 1300 Coupe on sale in Australia: the "9" and its baby brother, the "7". The cars were identical in body and trim specification and shared the 1300 engine capacity. More>>
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Honda Civic  

Honda Civic Series I

1972 - 1979
To break into the lucrative international markets Honda needed to produce a vehicle perceived as 'economical', having the appeal of the venerable Mini, while offering new levels of ride and comfort. More>>
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Honda Accord  

Honda Accord Series I

1976 - 1981
When the Accord was released Honda had manufacturers from Wolfsburg, Milan, Turin, Billancourt and even Japanese Toyota in their sights. Of course with the benefit of hindsight we can claim the Accord was a brilliant car – arguably better than any of the competitors. It was beautiful, it went well, cornered well and stopped well. More>>
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Honda Legend  

Honda Legend

1986 - 1990
The Honda Legend was arguably the first attempt by a Japanese manufacturer to compete head on with the European luxury car makers, the first Japanese car purpose built to tackle Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi, Volvo and Saab on their own terms. More>>
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Honda NSX  

Honda NSX

1991 -
In 1991 Honda was to release undoubtedly their finest car, and a worthy flagship for the marque, the mighty NSX. Graced with sleek and purposeful styling, the NSX was embodied with a sublime rear-wheel drive chassis and a fantastic mid-mounted V6 engine - the only thing lacking was the cache of its European rivals. More>>
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Honda S2000

Honda S2000

1999 -
The Honda S2000 produces more power per litre than any other non-turbo production engine and sends the rev counter needle sweeping around to the 9,000 mark. Honda built this remarkable two-litre car to celebrate its 50 year anniversary. More>>
Hudson Road Tests and Reviews
Hudson Hornet Generation 1

Hudson Hornet Generation 1

1951 - 1954
Hudson Hornets were available as a two-door coupe, four-door sedan, a convertible and a hardtop coupe. The models were priced the same as Commodore Eight, which was priced from US$2,543 to $3,099. All Hornets (1951 - 1953) were powered by Hudson's high-compression straight-six "H-145" engine. More>>
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Hudson Hornet Generation 2  

Hudson Hornet Generation 2

1955 - 1957
In the mid 1950s it seemed there were two quite distinct forms of motor cars and motoring, the European and the American. The Hudson Hornet was a car specifically and undeniably made to meet the technique and needs of American drivers. The Hudson was a very large car, weighing in at a little over 34cwt at the kerb, it was over 17ft long, and 6ft 6in wide. This car would accept six adults with space to spare. More>>
Humber Road Tests and Reviews
Humber Hawk  

Humber Hawk

1957 - 1967
While the Hawk was generally a sound and solid car, there were some minor irritations noted by motoring journalists of the era. These included a sub-standard rear view mirror, poor gear ratios and heavy steering. Many of these minor issues were remedied with the release of the Series 1A in 1959. More>>
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Humber Super Snipe

Humber Super Snipe Series I - V

1958 - 1967
The Series I Super Snipe was introduced in 1958 with a 2655cc Six Cylinder engine, and sharing the same bodyshell as its smaller engined stablemate, the Humber Hawk, which used a 2267 cc four cylinder engine. Although mainly sold as a "saloon", other versions of the vehicle included the "limouisine" and "estate" models. More>>
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Humber Vogue

HumberVogue

1963 - 1966
At the time, the Humber Vogue had the reputation for being "the safest car in wet conditions" then available in Australia. Of course to achieve that feat, it was also blessed with excessive understeer on a dry surface. Pretty much all Rootes cars, with the exception of the Imp, had very laudable built-in "fail-safe" systems of handling. More>>
Hyundai Road Tests and Reviews
Hyundai Excel

Hyundai Excel X1 and X2

1985 - 1994
The Excel was always a car with few pretensions. If getting from A to B as cheaply as possible was the only criteria of which to judge a car, then maybe the Excel would have made a case. But we could never forgive a car that is potentially dangerous – so that on any objective analysis, the Excel did not put forward a compelling case. But, for the sadists among us, it offered poor performance, sloppy suspension and bugger all comfort. More>>
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Hyundai Sonata  

Hyundai Sonata

1988 - 1993
The Y2 Sonata was part of Hyundai's expansion in North America after the success of the Excel. It was introduced in South Korea on June 1, 1988. It was then introduced in Canada in September 1987 as a 1988 model, in 1988, as a 1989 model in the United States, and in March 1989 in Australia. The exterior was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro of ItalDesign. More>>
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Hyundai Scoupe  

Hyundai Scoupe

1990 - 1995
The Scoupe was released in 1990, a time when Hyundai were making inroads on local markets by offering cheap reliable cars, but all were pretty forgettable. The Scoupe was to be a little different, however. It was even rumoured to have been designed by Giugiaro. But, being a Hyundai, it was the cheapest coupe available in many markets. More>>
Ilinga Road Tests and Reviews
Ilinga AF-2

Ilinga AF-2

1974
Where the car really shone was with it's brilliant chassis. Rivolta proposed the use of a platform chassis to allow easier and more cost effective mass production, the challenge was for Bizzarrini to produce something that was cost effective yet maintained rigidity. His answer was the design of a pressed-steel and welded panel chassis designed to flex up and down, which would be countered by the body that was designed to flex forward and backward. More>>
International Scout Road Tests and Reviews
International Scout Traveler  

International Scout Traveler

1975 - 1980
The International Scout Traveler filled its role well, that of a large multi-purpose 4WD. There was plenty of room in the back, in fact enough for two to sleep comfortably, and enough to transport a serious amount of gear for that extended trip off the tarmac. It stood in stark contrast to the svelte shape of the Range Rover, making no pretence at being small, nimble or, for that matter, fuel efficient. More>>
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International Scout Terra  

International Scout Terra

1975 - 1980
During the 1970’s the American adage that “Big is Beautiful” usually held true, but there were a few notable exceptions. Ford had proved this with their top selling Bronco, small by US standards it was able to go places the bigger 4x4’s simply were unable to go, mainly because of their sheer size! International followed suit with the Scout Terra, but in the process stole a march on the opposition by producing it as a pick-up which was smaller than other 4WD pick-ups on the market. More>>
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International Scout Traveltop

International Scout Traveltop

1975 - 1980
The Scout Traveltop from International Harvester was aimed at buyers of four-wheel-drive vehicles who wanted the power and comfort of the enormous Scout Traveler but without the size and weight of the top-of-the-line vehicle in the Scout range. The short wheelbase iteration carried over almost identical mechanicals, although purists thought the styling of the SWB iteration was less than beautiful when compared to the LWB versions. More>>
ISO Road Tests and Reviews
Iso Rivolta  

Iso Rivolta

1962 - 1968
Where the car really shone was with it's brilliant chassis. Rivolta proposed the use of a platform chassis to allow easier and more cost effective mass production, the challenge was for Bizzarrini to produce something that was cost effective yet maintained rigidity. His answer was the design of a pressed-steel and welded panel chassis designed to flex up and down, which would be countered by the body that was designed to flex forward and backward. More>>
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Iso Grifo  

Iso Grifo

1964 - 1974
In 1964 a prototype Grifo A3/C raced at Le Mans, being driven by Edgar Berney and Pierre Noblet. The Grifo proved itself on the day, coming a credible 14th place. Bizzarrini was left to ponder what could of been, the two hour pit stop to address brake problems costing the car a possible podium finish. In the end, only 22 A3/C's were constructed before the Rivolta/Bizzarrini collaboration came to an end. More>>
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Iso Lele Sport

Iso Lele Sport

1969 - 1974
There were two versions of the Lele (pronounced Lay-lee), the standard model and the Sport, while there was a longer wheelbase, four-door, four-seater sports saloon called the Fidea. The car is named after Lele Rivolta, wife of Piero Rivolta (son of Iso company founder Renzo). More>>
Isuzu Road Tests and Reviews
Isuzu Bellett  

Isuzu Bellett

1963 - 1973
The Isuzu Bellett is a mostly forgotten vehicle these days, however duing the late 1960's it proved to be one of the most successful Japanese imports to land on Australian shores. More>>
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Isuzu Florian  

Isuzu Florian

1967 - 1983
The Isuzu Florian represented a sweeping change that other Japanese manufacturers were soon to follow. Simply put, it was undoubtedly one of the most rugged and durable Japanese cars ever built up to that time, and it offered very respectable performance for its class and price. More>>
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Isuzu 117 Coupé

Isuzu 117 Coupé

1968 - 1981
The Isuzu 117 Coupé was to be Turin designer Giugiaro's first real research project in his new capacity as Styling and Design centre director at Ghia. The car went into mass production in 1968 and stayed for thirteen years, with almost 100,000 units to its credit. Substituted in 1981 by the Isuzu Piazza, today these cars are as popular as ever with collectors and boast a huge world-wide fan base. More>>
Jaguar Road Tests and Reviews
Jaguar SS100  

Jaguar SS100

1936
While not pioneering any technical innovation that characterised the post-war Jaguar models, no one could deny the SS100's fine performance, handling, styling, build quality and competitive price. More>>
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Jaguar Mk.V  

Jaguar Mk.V

1948 - 1951
At the 1948 Motor Show, Jaguar was to unveil both the Mk. V and XK 120 - the first new design post war Jaguars. The Mk. V was available with either a 2.5 litre or 3.5 litre engine, the smaller capacity 2.5 being the "entry" model for the Mk V range. More>>
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Jaguar XK120  

Jaguar XK120

1948 - 1954
Designed to be a low-volume dream car rather than a high production motor car, the Jaguar XK120/140/150 became an overnight sensation and highly profitable. More>>
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Jaguar XK140  

Jaguar XK140

1954 - 1957
The new Jaguar XK140 featured similar body pressings as the XK120, but the doors were now 3 inches longer as the engine, bulkhead and windscreen had been moved forward to improve the interior space. More>>
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Jaguar D-Type  

Jaguar D-Type

1955 - 1957
Although Jaguar were to leave racing at the end of 1956, private teams would continue to enjoy success driving the D-Type. At the 1957 Le Mans, D-Types were to finish first, second, third, fourth and sixth! A great success, but without the arch rival Mercedes-Benz perhaps not terribly suprising. More>>
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Jaguar Mk. VIII  

Jaguar Mk. VIII

1956 - 1959
The 1956 - 1959 Jaguar Mark VIII was a slightly heavier replacement for the Mark VII/VIIM sedans. It featured minor styling changes and more power, but was otherwise the same. More>>
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Jaguar XK150  

Jaguar XK150

1957 - 1960
The interior of the XK150 featured walnut veneer on the dashboard, while mechanically one of the main changes were the Dunlop disc brakes now fitted both ends, replacing the previous disc/drum setup. More>>
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Jaguar Mk. X  

Jaguar Mk. X

1961 - 1970
This car still holds the title as being the broadest British production saloon being 1.93 metres across its rear. It offered independent suspension and power-steering and was half the price of its rivals. More>>
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Jaguar Mk. II  

Jaguar Mk. II

1961 - 1975
The Mk. II was the last proper sports saloon made by Jaguar and became somewhat of a 60's icon. Quiet, comfortable and stately in appearance, under the Mk. II bonet lay an eager and impressive motor capable of 201 km/h in 3.8 litre form. More>>
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Jaguar E-Type  

Jaguar E-Type

1961 - 1975
This car was arguably the most beautiful sportscar of the 1960's with its cool aerodynamics and unashamed showmanship. More>>
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Bertone Jaguar Pirana  

Bertone Jaguar Pirana

1967
Although the Bertone Jaguar Pirana was never intended to be more than a concept car, it was a fully functioning vehicle worthy of supercar status, and more importantly was completed in record time using parts already available courtesy of an E-Type donor car. More>>
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Jaguar XJ6  

Jaguar XJ6

1968 - 1987
The XJ6 was launched in 1968 with a design that boasted ride comfort, quietness and great road-handling. It was a front-engined, rear-wheel drive, coil-sprung saloon and had a ride that was softer and quieter than a Rolls Royce. More>>
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Jaguar XJS

Jaguar XJS

1975 - 1991
Launched as the replacement for the E-type in 1975, and available in either coupe or convertible format, the XJ-S is now getting the recognition it deserves. More>>
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Jaguar XJ Series 3

Jaguar XJ Series III

1979- 1992
Jaguar's of the 1970's were never perfect. Like all others, there were design and manufacturing weaknesses. They had problems and failures. But compared with their international rivals, Jaguar's XJ saloons were unrivalled. Bob Knight was the chief architect of the original XJ chassis, and by the time the Series III was released, he had been promoted to Jaguar's Managing Director. More>>
Jeep Road Tests and Reviews
Jeep Wagoneer

Jeep Wagoneer

1963 - 1991
The fulltime Quadra-Trac system used by Jeep used a chain-driven transfer case that distributed power to the front and rear drive-shafts. What made Quadra-Trac different from other fulltime 4WD systems being offered at the time was a limited-slip differential in the transfer case that operated between the two drive-shafts. More>>
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Jeep Cherokee SJ

Jeep Cherokee SJ

1976 - 1983
While the trend towards using supposedly off-road vehicles for everyday use, not to mention status symbols, was still growing in Western Europe in 1979 (as the growing numbers of Matra Simca Ranchos and Range Rovers without a trace of mud on them bore witness) it was well established in the USA. More>>
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Jeep CJ-7

Jeep CJ-7

1976 - 1986
The name Jeep, at least to we here at Unique Cars and Parts (with our eye on the older cars) conjures up visions of the workhorse of the Allied forces, overcoming seemingly insurmountable obstacles in Europe during World War 2. Or maybe of Lawsie (aka John Laws, or the Golden Tonsils) expousing the virtues of Valvoline oil - for those old enough to remember the television commercial. More>>
Jensen Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Jensen Jen-Tug  

Jensen Jen-Tug Lorry

1948 - 1954
We doubt many would know that Jensen Motors Ltd., of West Bromwich, introduced a six-wheeled outfit known as the Jen-Tug after World War 2. It was, to say the least, an interesting machine designed to perform work comparable to that of a horsed vehicle, although its robust construction was probably an invitation to some operators to overload it. Pressed steel channel-section side members were employed for the tractor frame. More>>
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Jensen Interceptor  

Jensen Interceptor and FF

1966 - 1971
The Jensen Interceptor (and FF) was clearly the most outstanding vehicles built by Jensen. It was both good-looking and quick and displayed a new touring-style body. More>>
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Jensen Interceptor Mk3  

Jensen Interceptor Mk.3 7.2 Litre

1971 - 1974
Like the Aston Martin DBS V8, the Jensen Interceptor Mk.III seemed to fly in the face of the Supercar Superscare, with its huge 7.2 litre Chrysler V8 fed through a four-barrel Carter carburetter. Of course if you speak to anyone lucky enough to have owned one of these special Jensen's they will tell you there was a therapeutic quality derived from jumping behind the wheel, something that made the cost of fuel seem somehow irrelevant. More>>
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Jensen Healey

Jensen Healey

1972 - 1976
When Jensen obtained the services of Donald Healey, who had just finished working at BMC, together with Donald’s son Geoffrey, the idea of a stylish yet affordable Jensen seemed a shoe in. The winning formula would capture much of the charisma of the 1960’s Austin Healey’s, and combine that with the engineering prowess of Jensen. That was the theory. More>>
Kaiser-Frazer Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Kaiser Traveler  

Kaiser Traveler

1949 - 1953
The original idea for a hatchback design was not European, but American, and like so many other innovations in automobile design, it came from one of the smaller post World War II manufacturers. More>>
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Kaiser Henry-J  

Kaiser Henry-J.

1950 - 1954
Referred to by Frank Zappa as the “ironing board from hell” (after experiencing the back seat while doing a cross-country tour) the Henry-J was naturally enough the brainchild of Henry J Kaiser, chairman of Kaiser-Frazer Corporation, who thought that by adding a car that could be built inexpensively he would be able to emulate the success that Henry Ford had with the Model-T. More>>
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Kaiser DKF X-161 Darrin

Kaiser DKF X-161 Darrin

1953 - 1954
Kaiser needed a hero car, something to raise the profile and show it could compete with the best that Ford or GM could produce. It was a huge jump from the more humble Henry-J to this wonderful streamlined 2 door convertible, and had it made serious production it would no doubt have garnered a huge following for the marque. More>>
Lada Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lada Niva  

Lada Niva 4x4

1977 -
The Niva (2121) was Lada's (VAZ/AvtoVAZ) first non-Fiat based model. Much of its mechanicals were carried over from the Fiat based Lada models, though the body, four-wheel drive system, and front suspension were designed by Lada. More>>
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Lada 1600  

Lada 1600 LS and ES

1978- 2001
Lada set about making changes to the 124 design to ensure some degree of longevity in the harsh climate of Eastern Europe. These included the use of aluminium brake drums which were added to the rear, and the original Fiat engine was dropped in favour of a newer design also purchased from Fiat. This new engine had a modern overhead camshaft design but was never used in Fiat cars. More>>
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Lada Samara

Lada Samara

1984 - 2004
The Lada Samara had a short stay in Australia, and few shed a tear when it left our shores. The brand name Samara originally was used only for exported models, being named after the city of Samara in Russia. On home soil the same model was called "Sputnik", although we are not sure what the Russian words are for "space junk", which would have been far more accurate. More>>
Lagonda Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lagonda V12 Rapide  

Lagonda V12 Rapide

1939
Any Lagonda is collectable, highly collectable. But there is one model that, arguably, stands out from the handful of others - and that is the 1939 V12 Rapide. At the time Lagonda made both a 6 cylinder and V12 version of the Rapide, and strangely it was the V12 iteration that had the slightly shorter wheelbase. More>>
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Aston Martin Lagonda Series 1

Aston Martin Lagonda Series 1

1975
When the new management took over Aston Martin in the early 1970s there was one hidden asset - a design for a long wheelbase four-door model to bear the Lagonda name. In fact this car was designed first and one of them was built for the personal use of Sir David Brown. The then current Aston Coupe, though widely acclaimed as a clean and well balanced modern design, was actually a shortened version of the sedan. More>>
Lamborghini Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lamborghini 350 GT  

Lamborghini 350 GT

1964 - 1968
Released in 1964, the 350 GT was deemed to be Lamborghini's first production car. More>>
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Lamborghini Espada  

Lamborghini Espada

1968 - 1978
Lamborghini's Espada offered not only comfort and space but, when it originated, was the fastest four-seater in the world. More>>
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Lamborghini Miura  

Lamborghini Miura

1966 - 1972
This dramatic road car lifted Lamborghini to the manufacturer of advanced supercars, surpassing Ferrari in some pundits eyes. More>>
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Lamborghini Jarama  

Lamborghini Jarama

1970 - 1976
There wasn't a whole lot of front leg room, either. A dead pedal next to the clutch (LHD model) effectively kept that leg bent unless you weaseled the left foot underneath their clutch and behind said brace. A man of say 5 ft 10 in. with smallish feet could get his left leg comfortable ... if he didn't like to shift very often. If we were writing for Top Gear, we would say it was perfect for the Hampster, but not so for Jeremy. More>>
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Lamborghini Urraco  

Lamborghini Urraco

1972 - 1977
The Urraco was an ambitious project, Ferruccio Lamborghini wanting to move over 2,000 units each year, thus turning Lamborghini into an Italian success story like their nemesis Porsche. While the theory was good, the timing was completely wrong, with the 1970's energy crisis putting pay to this adventurous project. More>>
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Lamborghini Jalpa  

Lamborghini Jalpa

1982 - 1988
Evolving from the Urraco, the Lamborghini Jalpa was the cheapest from the marque during the 80's, and was intended to compete with the likes of the Ferrari 308 and 328GTB. More>>
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Lamborghini Diablo

Lamborghini Diablo

1990 - 1998
The Lamborghini Diablo was launched in 1990 as successor to the legendary Countach, and it went on to survive for 11 years during which time some 2884 cars were built. Interestingly, the name Diablo means "Devil" in Spanish (not Italian). More>>
Lancia Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lancia Aurelia GT  

Lancia Aurelia GT

1951 - 1956
At the Turin motor show of 1950, Lancia introduced a typically innovative new saloon, the B-10 Aurelia. While it continued Lancia's traditional sliding-pillar independent front suspension, and Lancia's equally traditional mono-constructed bodyshell, the car had as well a new system of independent rear suspension by semi-trailing arms, rear-mounted clutch/gearbox/differential, and the world's first production V6 engine. More>>
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Lancia Flaminia  

Lancia Flaminia

1957 - 1970
A brilliant looking car built in very small numbers by Lancia was the Flaminia convertible. Launched in 1958, the Flaminia featured a 2458cc V6 engine that developed a healthy 140 bhp. The Flaminia (which replaced the Aurelia) was specially developed as a six-seater for the wealthy.  As such, it was one of the most expensive Italian cars then available, and was therefore much favoured by politicians and film stars. More>>
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Lancia Flaminia GT / GTL / Convertible  

Lancia Flaminia GT/GTL/Convertible

1958 - 1965
Carrozzeria Touring designed and built the beautiful aluminium bodied two-door Flaminias, these being easily distinguished by their four round headlights (rather than two on Pininfarina Flaminias), and a shorter cabin - the wheelbase was decreased significantly for the GT and Convertibile, allowing for only two seats to be mounted. The GT was a coupé, while the Convertibile was obviously a cabriolet version (with optional hardtop). More>>
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Lancia Flavia  

Lancia Flavia

1960 - 1970
Refinement, performance, sophistication. The Flavia had bucket loads of personality, and just enough quirks and foibles to remind you that you were driving an Italian car. That was always part of the experience. Those that couldn't appreciate a car with personality would never have stopped by at their local Lancia dealer, which was probably a good thing. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia Coupe  

Lancia Fulvia Coupe

1965 - 1973
Look under the bonnet and you would see where the money went. In many aspects of the car's character, the Fulvia coupe could be likened to a precision watch. The exclusive styling attracted a lot of attention and the practical package size made it a terrific car around town. But out on the open road, its true breeding would begin to show and the coupe would become a fast touring car with few rivals. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF  

Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF

1968 - 1969
As far as the Fulvia goes, the 1.6 HF was seen to be the best. It boasted two world championships and was capable of reaching 184 km/h. More>>
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Lancia Stratos Bertone Zero Prototype  

Lancia Stratos Bertone Zero Prototype

1970
The Lancia Stratos HF prototype was a styling exercise by Bertone, first show at the Turin Motor show in October 1970. It was a futuristic design with a wedge shaped profile and stood just 33 inches (84 cm) from the ground. It was so low, that conventional doors where not used. Instead, drivers had to flip up the windscreen and walk into the car, to gained entry. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia 1300 Coupe S3  

Lancia Fulvia 1300 Coupe S3

1973 - 1976
The Lancia Fulvia 1300 was not a car for an unsympathetic (read lazy) driver, simply because of the need to use the gearbox and engine energetically. It was instead a fabulously rewarding little car for a good driver. More>>
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Lancia Stratos  

Lancia Stratos

1973 - 1975
Lancia took a rather novel course with the design of their Stratos - instead of the more conventional scheme of transforming a "Gran Turismo" into a competition machine, the new model was a competition car adapted for road use and destined for rally work. More>>
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Giovanni Michelotti Lancia Beta Mizar  

Giovanni Michelotti Lancia Beta Mizar

1975
Few would argue that, in the mid 1970s, Italian designers reigned supreme, by virtue of their stranglehold on innovative, practical styling. Manufacturers beat a path to their doors from America, Japan, Australia, Korea, and many major European producers – even Communist bloc car-makers sought out the Italian design studios. More>>
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Lancia Beta Coupe  

Lancia Beta Coupe

1975 - 1984
Style and performance were not all that this suave Italian offered, the fuel economy usually bettering 30 mpg on a country trip and not much under when in heavy traffic. Yes, the Lancia was not without its faults, but it featured beautiful lines, great all-round performance and quickly became a very desirable machine. More>>
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Lancia Montecarlo  

Lancia Montecarlo

1975 - 1982
From Italy, sired by the huge Fiat conglomerate, the two-seater, mid-engined, Lancia Beta Montecarlo appeared - finally a mid-engined sports car for the masses! An almost "ugly-but-beautiful", low and stubby design stamped front and rear by the US-mandatory, impact-absorbing bumpers/body-work. More>>
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Lancia Gamma Coupe  

Lancia Gamma Coupe

1976 - 1984
When the Gamma arrived in 1977 it seemed something of a departure for the Italian company. Part of the answer to this lay in the fact that Lancia was part of the Fiat group, and had been since 1969; the Lancia name had always had connotations of quality and prestige, it seemed a good idea for the new Fiat 'flagship' which replaced the old Fiat 130 to have the Lancia stamp. More>>
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Lancia Delta  

Lancia Delta (series 1)

1979 - 1983
Lancia's small hatchback, code-named Epsilon but renamed Delta after months of introduction delay due to the strikes that paralysed Italian industry, could well be regarded as a cousin to Fiat's Ritmo/Strada. Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, the Delta was, for a period of time, also sold in Sweden by Saab Automobile, badged as the Saab 600. More>>
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Lancia Rally  

Lancia Rally

1982
There's was little more than a family resemblance to the Beta Monte Carlo in the Lancia Rally, built in a limited series of 200 to make it eligible for Group B commpetition. More>>
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Lancia Thema  

Lancia Thema

1984 - 1994
During the mid-1980's the Fiat group began to rationalise it chassis/platforms so that the same body could be used on different Fiat, Alfa Romeo and Lancia models. More>>
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Lancia Delta S4

Lancia Delta S4

1985
Sadly, during the 1986 Corsica Rally, driver Henri Toivonen and navigator Sergio Cresto were killed in their S4. Resultant FIA findings saw the termination of Group B rally cars - deemed to be too powerful and dangerous. The Lancia Delta S4 became the most outstanding rally car in history not to win a world title. More>>
Land-Rover Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Land Rover Series 1  

Land Rover Series 1

1948 - 1958
The car's most notable appearance in a movie was in the South African film 'The Gods Must Be Crazy', and from our expericence the brakes were never that good although the film version did go to extremes! More>>
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Land Rover Series II  

Land Rover Series 2

1958 - 1971
After 20 years of uninterrupted producction Rover claimed that 600,000 Land-Rovers were operating in more than 170 different territories all over the world. Over that time the outward appearances changed remarkably little, but major developments, particularly to the power unit, had been introduced over the years. More>>
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Land Rover Series 2A Six Cylinder  

Land Rover Series 2A Six

1958 - 1971
Did the fitment of the 6L engine improve what was already very good? The simple answer is yes. The vehicle did not lose any of its character, remaining very much a utility vehicle, specifically designed for hard use and exacting conditions. The 6-cylinder engine option only improved hill climbing and offered better performance. The "character" of the Matilda remained - and that was a good thing. More>>
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Range Rover  

Range Rover Series 1

1970 - 1996
Whoever it was at Rover that convinced the powers to be to develop a "high end" Land Rover must have had an accurate crystal ball, the resulting Range Rover proving to be a huge sales success and spawning a love affair for many with the notion of driving a large, expensive fuel guzzling monster capable of obliterating pedestrians and other road users without ever having the intention of taking the vehicle "off road". More>>
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Land Rover Series 3  

Land Rover Series 3 Stage 1

1980 - 1986
1980 heralded big news for lovers of the Land Rover, as now for the first time the Rover V8 engine could be optioned! Dubbed the "Stage 1", the V8 offered vastly superior performance and made the Land Rover a much more drivable conveyance on the highway - and was the first Land Rover to feature full time 4WD. More>>
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Land Rover Discovery

Land Rover Discovery

1990 -
Many commentators were critical at the time of the Disco's bland styling, which looked traditional and obviously familiar. But they were missing the point, here was a Range Rover for the masses, and the public loved it. It was a shame then that the quality control was not able to keep pace with the rapid expansion of the production facilities, and the inevitable damage to the Discovery's reputation followed a string of reliability issues. More>>
Leyland Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Leyland P76

Leyland P76

1973 - 1975
The P76 was launched in 1973 by BMC-Leyland in an attempt to break into the lucrative "Family Car" segment being held firmly by the 'Big Three', GM Holden with the Kingswood, Ford with the Falcon and Chrysler with the Valiant. In the past, BMC had enjoyed success with its English imports such as the Austin, Morris and of course the ever popular Mini. More>>
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Leyland Force 7

Leyland Force 7

1974
The Force 7 was one of the first hatchbacks to be released in Australia. There were to be three models of increasing price and luxury, from the base model equipped with a six cylinder engine and 3-speed column shift gearbox, followed by the awesome Force 7V fitted with a powerful 4.4 litre V8 'four-on-the-floor'. At the top of the tree was the "Tour de Force", featuring leather interior. More>>
Lightburn-Zeta Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lightburn Zeta  

Lightburn Zeta

1963 - 1966
During the 1980's you could be forgiven for thinking many car manufacturers were turning their products into mere appliances - but if you were to wind the clock back even further (to the 1960's), you would find the Lightburn whitegoods manufacturer turning the appliance into a car! More>>
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Lightburn Zeta Sports

Lightburn Zeta Sports

1964 - 1964
Despite failing to capture the imagination of the Australian public with the Zeta Station Sedan, Harold Lightburn pushed ahead with plans to release the Zeta sports car. More>>
Lincoln Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lincoln KB Convertible Sedan  

Lincoln KB Convertible Sedan

1932 - 1934
In 1931 Lincoln announced their own plans for a V12, designated the KB, to compete with the high standards set by Duesenberg, Cadillac and Marmon. At the direction of Edsel Ford, Lincoln chief engineer, Frank Johnson, came up with one of the greatest powerplants of the classic era. More>>
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Lincoln Continental

Lincoln Continental

1961 - 1979
The Lincoln Continental is recognised as one of America's most influential cars. More>>
Lotus Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Lotus 15  

Lotus 15

1958 - 1959
It was Lotus's most powerful sports car of the late 1950s, with the still-stretching Coventry Climax twin-cam four of either 1.5 or 2.0 litres as a power-plant, and a compact Chapman/Costin chassis controlling the trajectory. While probably not more than 30 Fifteens were built in all (Series One and Two in 1958, and about six of the Series Three in 1959), they were very successful machines in short-distance UK racing. More>>
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Lotus 7  

Lotus 7

1961 -
It had no doors, just cutaway sides and with its hood raised it was nearly impossible to get into this car. More>>
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Lotus 25  

Lotus 25

1962 - 1966
Formula One racing's "Age of the Monocoque" can be said to have dawned on May 20, 1962, in the Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort. On that day Jim Clark started his brand-new Lotus 25 from third-fastest place on the grid, led the entire field going away for 12 laps, and then slowed as he struck clutch trouble. More>>
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Lotus Elite  

Lotus Elite Type 14

1957 - 1963
The overhead-cam 1216cc engine powered the car reaching a top speed of 189 km/h. What made this vehicle unique was its quick handling. More>>
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Lotus Elan  

Lotus Elan

1962 - 1973
Its acceleration was dynamic - it could get to 96 km/h as fast as a Lamborghini Islero and once in top gear could easily mix it with cars like the 246 Dino and 911E Porsche. More>>
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Lotus Europa  

Lotus Europa

1966 - 1975
The Europa lays claim to being the worlds first everyday useable mid-engined car. More>>
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Lotus 72  

Lotus 72

1970 - 1975
The Lotus think tank developed a simple wedge-shaped body form which combined the maximum negative lift force with a low pitching moment thereby reducing tail-end squat and front-end dive to a minimum and providing a stable platform. The smooth response and acceleration of of the turbine engine helped in this respect, but the behavior of the 56 spoiled Lotus's drivers when they returned to Formula One. More>>
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Lotus Elite Type 75  

Lotus Elite Type 75

1974 - 1982
Launched in 1974, the Elite Type 75 was Lotus' very first saloon car, which featured a fibreglass hatchback bodyshell designed by Oliver Winterbottom, mounted on a steel chassis that had evolved from the Elan and Europa. More>>
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Lotus Esprit Series 1  

Lotus Esprit Series 1 and Series 2

1976 - 1980
These first cars eventually became known as S1 (or Series 1) Esprits. With a steel backbone chassis and a fibreglass body, the Esprit was powered by the Lotus 907 4 cylinder engine, as previously used in the Jensen Healey. More>>
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Lotus Esprit Turbo  

Lotus Esprit Turbo

1980 - 1987
Introduced in April 1981, the Turbo Esprit and S3 (Series 3) Esprits marked a necessary consolidation: both new models had a common chassis, inheriting much of the configuration of the Essex cars, whilst body production was based on a single common set of moulds. More>>
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Lotus Esprit Turbo HC  

Lotus Esprit Turbo HC

1986 - 1988
The Esprit was seen as a Ferrari or Lamborrghini rival, which it was in dynamic and visual terms, but it was way behind these in mechanical refinement and practicality, even by mid-engined standards. At either end of the scale there were more useable mid-engined cars: a Ferrari Testarossa or a Toyota MR2 both enjoyed better visibility, though neither was as impressive to look at as the Esprit. More>>
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Lotus Esprit - Peter Stevens

Lotus Esprit Turbo - Peter Stevens

1988 - 2004
Improve on one of the most perfect shapes from one of the greatest automotive designers; that was the scale of the challenge Lotus faced in producing a new Esprit. More>>
Marmon Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Marmon Roosevelt

Marmon Roosevelt

1929 - 1930
The best known Marmon of all is arguably the 1929 "Straight 8" Roosevelt. The Roosevelt was unbelievably cheap, and took the honours as being the first 8 cylinder car to sell for less than US$1000. Better still, it was also the first ever car to be fitted with a factory installed radio. The low price put the Roosevelt within reach of those that previously had to settle for 4 or 6 cylinder cars, and in its first year of production Marmon managed to sell 22,300 - a huge number at the time. More>>
Maserati Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Maserati 450S V8  

Maserati 450S V8

1956
The Maserati 450S V8 was a spectacularly fast contender for major sports car championship honours when it arrived on the scene at the end of 1956, but a number of trifling failures and misjudgements prevented it from showwing its full potential in a great many races during 1957. More>>
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Maserati Ghibli  

Maserati Ghibli

1967 - 1973
The Ghibli was seen as Maserati's answer to the Ferrari 275 GTB and the Lamborghini 350 GT. It was not as technically advanced as these two, but was a very attractive vehicle with its long lean shape. It was capable of reaching 241 km/h with its 4.7 V8 motor despite having a body made of steel. Later engines were 4.9 litre V8's which increased the top speed achievable to 265 km/h. It was smooth and relied on torque rather than power. More>>
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Maserati Bora/Merak  

Maserati Bora/Merak

1971 - 1980
When Lamborghini started producing the Miura, it was only a matter of time manufacturers like Maserati followed suit. The result was the 1971 Bora. Styled by Italdesign it was elegant but perhaps lacking a little animal beauty possessed by the Ghibli and Miura. It was incredibly fast, with its 4.7-litre V8 engine it could top 281 km/h. More>>
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Maserati Khamsin  

Maserati Khamsin

1974 - 1976
It was named after an Egyptian wind it was crafted in steel with its glazed rear panel being a standout. Air-conditioning was standard in these cars and they also boasted an adjustable steering column and hydraulic seats. More>>
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Maserati Kyalami

Maserati Kyalami

1975 - 1982
This Frua-styled two-by-two Kyalami hatchback coupe was originally designed for the 1976 Turin motor show. It combined all the traditional virtues of cars bearing the famous trident symbol – luxury, exclusiveness, and unquestionable power. Named after South Africa's Formula 1 circuit, the Kyalami was actually rushed into production after Alessandro de Tomaso took control of Maserati, and would remain in manufacture until 1982. More>>
Matra Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Matra-Simca Bagheera

Matra-Simca Bagheera

1973 - 1980
In 1973 Matra entered a sales agreement with Chrysler attempting to benefit from the conglomerates widespread dealer network. Named after the panther from Jungle Book, the Matra-Simca Baghera was powered by the Simca-1100TI 1294cc engine, arguably underpowered, however the low air-resistance from the Bagheera’s lovely low slung body helped make the car reasonably quick. More>>
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Matra Bagheera U8

Matra Bagheera U8

1974
The Matra Bagheera was a fine car - but it was powered by a 1294cc, 84-bhp four cylinder engine. Underpowered when you consider how well sorted the chassis was. It was a car that was crying out for more power. But rather than opt for bolting on a turbo, the French engineers came up with the U8 – simply put, two four-cylinder engines bolted together but running independently. More>>
Mazda Cars Road Tests and Reviews
Mazda Cosmo  

Mazda Cosmo

1966 - 1972
The Cosmo was Mazda's rather futuristic car and was designed from the ground up. It was perceived as Mazda's first foray into the world of high-performing excitement machines. More>>
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Mazda 1500  

Mazda 1500

1967 - 1974
In many regards the 1500 was the car for the time, bridging the gap between large family 6 cylinders and the small 4 cylinder variety, this market segment dominated by the Japanese but now being challenged by locals such as the HB Torana and Ford Escort. More>>
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Mazda 1500 DeLuxe  

Mazda 1500 DeLuxe

1967 - 1974
Even a superficial examination of the Mazda 1500 DeLuxe showed this was a quality made car, parallel perhaps with BMW in Germany or Rover in the UK, although it lacked the Rover 2000's technical enterprise. More>>
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Mazda 1800  

Mazda 1800

1968 - 1974
The Mazda 1800 was aptly called "The Leading Lady", it at the time heading the magnificent range of Mazda Sedans. By putting a powerful 1800cc 104 bhp engine into the delightfully styled Mazda 1500 body shell, the engineers at Toyo Kogyo had given the chassis the type of power it deserved, and needed. More>>
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Mazda 1200  

Mazda 1200

1968 - 1974
In 1968 the Mazda 1200 set a new bench mark for affordable quality in the small car segment, it then being the cheapest 4 door car on the market. The all-alloy engine was specifically designed by the Mazda engineers for the 1200, and the 73 horsepower engine was enough to push the car to 90 miles an hour, for those who dared. More>>
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Mazda R100  

Mazda R100

1968 - 1974
The Mazda R100 Rotary Coupe was powered by the dream engine of the 1960's - an engine so small two would fit into the space of most big sixes, an engine so smooth you needed a rev counter to tell it was going. And the most amazing fact of all - it developed the horsepower of piston engines two to three times its size. More>>
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Mazda Capella  

Mazda Capella 1600

1970 - 1977
TAlthough the Mazda 1500/1800 series went over pretty well with Australian motorists, it was never a great seller in Japan. To address this, Mazda released the Capella – which they believed would be a better competitor and take the fight up to the big sellers from opposition Japanese companies Toyota, Datsun and Mitsubishi. More>>
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Mazda RX2  

Mazda RX2

1970 - 1978
The Mazda RX2 is credited with being the first "normal" car to be fitted with a rotary engine. Available as a 4 door sedan or 2 door coupe, the RX2 quickly gained a reputation for good performance and poor petrol economy. More>>
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Mazda RX3  

Mazda RX3

1972 - 1978
The good folks at Mazda have proven to be rather adept at manufacturing extrodinarily exciting cars - todays RX8 and MX5 both being brilliant cars to drive while remaining relatively affordable. And back in 1972 the affordable pocket rockets were undoubtedly the Mazda RX2 and RX3. More>>
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Mazda RX4  

Mazda RX4

1972 - 1977
The Mazda RX4, known in its home market the Luce Rotary, was one hell of a car, whether it be in sedan or hardtop form. The RX4 featured the 130 bhp Capella Wankel engine, and unlike the previous RX3, this was the very first Mazda to have been designed by Toyo Kogyo as exclusively Wankel powered. It was a bigger car than the Capella, being within a whisker of the TC Cortina in external and internal dimensions. More>>
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Mazda 929 Sedan  

Mazda 929 Generation 1

1973 - 1977
Mazda's 929 was their top of the range 1800cc-engined sedan - capable as a family car yet retaining just enough executive overtones to make it a little special. But 1800 was too few "cc" for those who really enjoyed their driving. If you pushed the car hard, the fuel economy would fall through the floor, and there was little to be gained anyway. Instead, the car suited those who enjoyed the gentle, easy approach. More>>
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Mazda Roadpacer  

Mazda Roadpacer

1975 - 1977
The intelligent and advanced concept of global outsourcing applied to the development of the Mazda Roadpacer AP offered a high-quality small volume mass-produced vehicle with a shortened development time and less cost in terms of investment. Well - that was the theory. More>>
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Mazda Cosmo 121  

Mazda Cosmo 121

1975 - 1981
The Mazda 121 was, to our eyes, one of the best looking cars from the late 1970s. It seemed to buck the trend of the Japanese to embellish their cars with fancy scrolls and plenty of bright work. It was obviously aimed at the American market, hence the opera window behind the door, which was a US design trend at the time, along with the pronounced grille that finds favour in the States. More>>
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Mazda 929L Generation 2  

Mazda 929L Generation 2

1977 - 1981
The 929L's design was American inspired, with stacked rectangular headlights and a large chrome grille. A more efficient 2.0 litre L4, producing 90 hp (66 kW) with a single-barrel carb replaced the existing engines. First presented in Japan in October 1979 was a facelifted version with large, rectangular headlights and a more orthodox appearance. More>>
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Mazda RX7  

Mazda RX7 Series 1

1979 - 1985
By the early 1970's Mazda had proved its committment to the rotary engine, in 1971 alone Mazda building over 200,000 rotary-powered vehicles. However the road for the rotary has never been smooth, and for Mazda things took a turn for the worse when the oil crisis of 1973 turned peoples attention to the poor fuel economy of the rotary. More>>
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Mazda 626  

Mazda 626 Series 1

1979 - 1982
The Mazda 626 series 1 proved to be a durable and reliable car, and was influential in developing Mazda's enviable reputation for quality. More>>
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Mazda 626 Coupe  

Mazda 626 Super Deluxe Coupe

1979 - 1982
Our review of the Mazda 626 was penned many years ago – and it was favourable partly because we were very familiar with one particular example that proved its reliability and solid construction – engine notwithstanding. But as good as the 626 was, there was one model that really was worthy of superlatives – the Super Deluxe Coupe. More>>
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Mazda 323 BG Familia  

Mazda 323 BG Familia

1980 - 1984
Mazda’s 4th generation 323, the BD, was released on October 10, 1980. It came hot on the heels of Mazda investing $A471 million at their Hiroshima plant during 1979 / 1980 - which had saddled the company with huge long term debt, which effectively prevented the company from joining the Japanese rush into US production. More>>
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Mazda MX5

Mazda MX5

1988 -
The MX5 owes much to the Lotus Elan, as that is where its designers sought inspiration - although Mazda always wanted to ensure that its car would be more reliable and solid than the little Lotus. They also wanted to ensure their new sports car offered modern "sedan" type comfort levels, despite the inevitable noise and climate problems associated with a "rag top". More>>
Mercedes-Benz Pre 1970 Road Tests and Reviews
Mercedes 70hp  

Mercedes 70hp

1904
The Mercedes 70hp was powered by a huge four-cylinder engine that displaced 9230cc, the engine of course being started via use of crank-handle. Getting into the driving seat was something of an acrobatic exercise, as the floor of the car was high off the ground and there was no step. More>>
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Mercedes 28/60 45/50 hp  

Mercedes 28/60 45/50 hp

1907 - 1914
A century ago, the owner of a Mercedes usually delegated cranking, praying and probably cursing as well to his unfortunate chauffeur. You would certainly need to be in good form to swing four cylinders totalling over 7¼ litres. More>>
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Mercedes SSK  

Mercedes-Benz SSK

1928
Designed by Ferdinand Porsche, the Mercedes SSK is regarded by most as the finest pre-war sports built. More>>
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Mercedes 540K  

Mercedes-Benz 500 & 540K

1934 - 1939
Definitely one of the most desirable masterpieces in the pre-war period, this car foresaw the trend of Mercedes-Benz in having incomparable build quality and elegance of design. More>>
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Mercedes 170V  

Mercedes-Benz 170V

1936 - 1953
In April 1945 Daimler Benz executives announced that the company had "ceased to exist", however some of the less damaged manufacturing plants fell into the Allied occupied zone and, after as many ex-employees could be located, production resumed on the 170. More>>
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Mercedes 170D  

Mercedes-Benz 170D

1949 - 1955
For a diesel powered Mercedes to be successful, the engineers needed to create a car that would perform as well if not better than its petrol cousin. And, as always, the Mercedes engineers succeeded. More>>
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Mercedes 170S  

Mercedes-Benz 170S

1949 - 1955
While the design of the 170S was not actually new, in fact its routes stretched back as far as 1936, it did play an important role in re-establishing Mercedes in post-war Europe. More>>
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Mercedes 220  

Mercedes-Benz 220

1951 - 1956
Introduced after a showing at the Frankfurt Auto Show of 1951, production began in July of 1951. Closely resembling the Mercedes 170S, the headlights were instead moved to the front fenders and the model featured much more elegant interior appointments. More>>
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Mercedes 300  

Mercedes-Benz 300

1951 - 1956
First introduced to the public at the 1951 Frankfurt Motor Show, the 300 is important in the post war Mercedes line-up as it represents the return by Mercedes to manufacturing outstanding high quality and luxurious automobiles. More>>
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Mercedes 300S  

Mercedes-Benz 300S

1951 - 1958
Simply put, these were not just good automobiles, they were great. The 170 may have helped re-establish Mercedes as a manufacturer, but it was the 300S that re-established it as the world's best automotive marque. More>>
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Mercedes 180  

Mercedes-Benz 180

1953 - 1962
When the 180 was introduced in 1953, its main feature was the new chassis design - one that used sectional steel side members tied into the floorpan - resulting in improved rigidity and noise reduction. More>>
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Mercedes 180D  

Mercedes-Benz 180D

1953 - 1962
The 180D used a four door unitary bodyshell which formed the basis for many other Mercedes saloon models. As with all Mercedes cars the 180 was well built and offered excellent reliability. More>>
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Mercedes 190  

Mercedes-Benz 190

1956 - 1965
The new look 190 was vastly more modern in appearance, the Mercedes designers incorporated fins for the first time, of course fins being almost mandatory on cars built in the early 1960's. More>>
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Mercedes 219  

Mercedes-Benz 219

1956 - 1959
The 219 represented an evolution rather than an evolution, and as is still the case with cars of today such an evolution involved increasing the length of the wheelbase and the power output of the motor. More>>
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Mercedes 220S  

Mercedes-Benz 220S

1956 - 1959
The 220S sedan was the third of the new generation models shown to the public at the Frankfurt Show in 1956. It was also the most powerful one of the trio and the most expensive one as well. More>>
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Mercedes 220SE  

Mercedes-Benz 220SE

1958 - 1960
While production of the 220SE began in April of 1958, the model would not come to market until September, and even then the Mercedes regular production lines would not get underway until October. More>>
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Mercedes 190D  

Mercedes-Benz 190D

1958 - 1965
While it was usual for the Mercedes diesel model to follow the release of the petrol driven variety, it would take an astonishing 2 years for the 190D to debut. More>>
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Mercedes 220S "Fintail"  

Mercedes-Benz 220S Fintail

1958 - 1968
Today there are still many "Finnies" on the road, such was the high build quality of these cars, and because the fins that were to date the design of the car so quickly are now seen as an excercise in design and beauty the 220 and 220S are appreciating in value. More>>
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Mercedes 220 "Fintail"  

Mercedes-Benz 220 Fintail

1959 - 1965
As with the model it was replacing (the 219), the new 220 was available with the "Hydrak" transmission until 1961. In fact for almost a year, between 1961 and 1962, the 220 was available in manual form only until Mercedes introduced a new "Auto" transmission as an option. More>>
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Mercedes 600 "Pullman"  

Mercedes-Benz 600 Pullman

1963 - 1981
In 1961 Mercedes built the 600 to be the world's ultimate saloon car, a luxurious Rolls Royce type car that had no regard to cost or compromise. It offered affluent members of society a 320 cm wheelbase and 5.5 metre four door saloon. More>>
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Mercedes 200  

Mercedes-Benz 200

1965 - 1968
Production of the "Fintail" 200 lasted until 1968 and, during the first year of its life, was the smallest of the seventeen models of passenger cars manufactured by Mercedes. More>>
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Mercedes 200D  

Mercedes-Benz 200D

1965 - 1968
It was during the production run of the 200D that the 500,000 Mercedes Diesel was manufactured - attesting to the popularity of Diesel even back in the 1950's and 1960's. More>>
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Mercedes-Benz 250  

Mercedes-Benz 250

1968 - 1974
The new model 250 broke fresh ground for Mercedes in having a new independent rear suspension using semi-trailing links instead of their famous low-pivot swing-axle. More>>
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Mercedes 250CE  

Mercedes-Benz 250C/CE

1968 - 1974
Mercedes coupes have always been eye-catchers, the two door design and resultant window shape making for sleek sophistication. More>>
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Mercedes 280 SE 3.5

Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5

1969 - 1971
The 280SE 3.5 luxury coupe and convertible were introduced at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 1969. The basic body style actually dated back to the 1961 220SE model, and it was only slightly altered. More>>
Mercedes-Benz Post 1970 Road Tests and Reviews
Mercedes 230.4  

Mercedes-Benz 230.4

1972 - 1976
Overall a good, dependable and economical car, the four cylinder motor did not have the performance of the larger 6 and V8 powered cars. More>>
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Mercedes 280SEL  

Mercedes-Benz 280SEL

1973 - 1980
Information being compiled. More>>
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Mercedes 280E  

Mercedes-Benz 280E

1975 - 1985
The 280E was enormously popular, thanks largely to the sweet 6 cylinder being equipped with the Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection system with air volume control (first seen in the 6.9 litre monster 450SEL). More>>
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Mercedes 450SEL  

Mercedes-Benz 450SEL

1975 - 1980
First offered in 1975, it shared the grand 600s 6.3 litre V8 but had it bored out to 417ci/6.835Ltrs to produce an appreciable 286hp and highway pounding 550Nm of torque.  It was and remains the biggest postwar engine mercedes ever made. More>>
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Mercedes-Benz 280TE  

Mercedes-Benz 280TE and 300TD

1978 - 1985
The Mercedes "T" car was based on the popular W 123 sized sedan. It went on sale in Europe in 1977, but, as usual due to Australian Design Rules, it took until late 1979 for MB to start looking at the Australian market for the excellent luxury machine. Production for Australia originated at the Bremen plant of Daimler Benz. More>>
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Mercedes-Benz 380 SEL  

Mercedes-Benz 380 SEL

1980 - 1985
Back when the 380 SEL was rolling off the Mercedes-Benz production line the car had few equals. BMW came the closest to the mark, while in a very different sphere, and Porsche was another over-engineered beast. All were German, the three of them bearing that unmistakable stamp of quality in every little feature. More>>
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Mercedes 300GD Gelandewagen  

Mercedes-Benz 300GD Gelandewagen

1981 - 1989
The 300GD Gelandewagen four wheel drive model was Mercedes answer to the Range Rover. Nobody had anticipated the demand for a luxury four wheel drive, however the "Rangie" was to prove far more successful in the showroom. Why?, perhaps that the 300GD was such a good off-road performer but lacked a little of the on road finesse of the Range Rover says more about the type of people buying these cars than the cars themselves. More>>
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Mercedes 190E  

Mercedes-Benz 190E<