Aston Martin Reviews and Road Tests

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Amphicar

Prestigous British marque plagued by financial mis-management. Built its first road going car in 1923, then went into receivership in 1924. Rescued by engineers Renwick and Bertilli, the cost of their racing programme would see the company founder again in the early 1930's. Two more ownership changes did not progress things much, until David Brown took control in 1947. His company may have built tractors, but it was now responsible for the manufacture of very desirable sports cars, just ask Bond.

Collector Notes: Aston Martin had a tumultuous career in post-war years, the ownership changing hands almost as often as governments in France. A two-litre sports came to Australia in 1949 and ran until 1951, when the sensational DB4 hit the scene. As far as this country is concerned, Aston's heyday was during the early 1960s thanks to the expensive but incredibly refined DB4 series. Open and closed models, powered by a 196 kW six-cylinder engine, provided ultra-performance as well as a rare degree of sophistication. The DB4 was also the ancestral base of the models which followed - including the DBS and DBS V8 and the DB5 of 1964. The DB6 arrived a year later and stayed until 1970. The oil squeeze and general economic malaise of the 1970s all but put the firm out of business. Its early cars are much sought after but be wary - they are extremely expensive to restore.

Also see: Aston Martin Heritage | The History of Aston Martin (USA Edition)
Aston Martin Mark II  

Aston Martin Mark II

1934 - 1936
Back in 1934 the British motoring journal, "The Autocar", published a road test of a truly fabulous sports car. Nothing unusual, you say. True, but what was written about this car could be classed as unusual because it was (and is) a rare occurrence for an English journalist to judge an English product as being so particularly praiseworthy. More>>
Aston Martin DB2  

Aston Martin DB2

1950 - 1959
The Aston Martin DB2 of 1950 was seen as the benchmark car for all future Astons. This was due to the coupe's luxurious and old-world charm that hosted a smooth (but powerful) six-cylinder twin-cam 116bhp engine from the Lagonda 2.6 saloon. More>>
Aston Martin DB2/4  

Aston Martin DB2/4

1950 - 1959
The DB2/4 was established in 1953 comprising a smooth and contoured fastback shape that was seen as far more practical because of its rear seats and side-hinged rear hatch that stretched the length by some 9 centimetres from the DB 2. More>>
Aston Martin DB Mk III  

Aston Martin DB Mk III

1950 - 1959
The twin SU carburettors stayed. David Brown had supplied the gearboxes on all DB models. It had a crash first gear and the option of overdrive on top gear on the MK III which gave 28.4 mph per 1000rpm. More>>
Aston Martin DB4  

Aston Martin DB4

1958 - 1963
Things didn't change quickly at Aston Martin during the 1950's, and nor should they have, given the Aston's were arguably the best sporting cars ever made. Much like the Mercedes philosophy, change for change's sake was not a principal held in high regard. More>>
Aston Martin DB5  

Aston Martin DB5

1963 - 1965
This car was introduced to Britain in 1963 and, at the time, was considered to be an aristocrat amongst sportscars of its time. It was extremely pricey, with the E-Type Jaguar being about half of its cost, but its use on the James Bond movie "Goldfinger" (1964) released the Aston Martin name to the entire world. More>>
Aston Martin V8  

Aston Martin V8

1969 - 1990
In 1969 the quad-cam all-alloy 375 bhp V8 catapulted the Aston to a top speed of 257 km/h. In 1973 its shape had altered with a new grille and single lamps on either side. More>>
Aston Martin Lagonda  

Aston Martin Lagonda

1976 - 1986
The 1976 showing of the Lagonda saloon showed the world a car that appeared to have originated from another planet. More>>
Aston Martin V8 Vantage  

Aston Martin V8 Vantage

1977 - 1989
A breathtakingly exciting, adrenalin churning super-car, the fastest accelerating production car in the World at the time, that was the Aston Martin V8 Vantage. More>>
Aston Martin Bulldog

Aston Martin Bulldog

1980
By 1978 the future of Aston looked much better than it ever had, and so Company Director Alan Curtis gave the green light for the construction of a prototype – a car that would serve as a symbol of the marques quest to look to the future and demonstrate innovation like no other. More>>
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