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Jaguar Car Company

Founded by William Lyons, bringing new style to Swallow sidecars, then manufacturing a series of special bodies for more common vehicles such as the Austin Seven, the Fiat Tipo 509A, the Standard 9 and the Standard 16. Lyons joined forces with William Walmsley, naming their new business SS Cars, the most famous being the 1935 SS90 and SS100. Used Jaguar as a model designation for its saloons and drop-head coupes. Struggled for a time after World War 2, never again making the famous SS100. Released the awesome XK120 Roadster at the 1948 Earls Court Motor Show, the company now opting to use the Jaguar name exclusively given the sinister connotations of SS following the war. Continued through the 1950's, 60's and 70's to build some of the most desirable and collectable sports cars and saloons around.

Collector Notes: Jaguars have sold in Australia since 1947 when four and six-cylinder models came in fairly small numbers. The chance of picking up an early one in good shape is fairly remote but, of the open cars, you can't go wrong with any of the XK120 (1949 to 1954) or XK140 (1954 to 1957) or XK150 (1957 to 1962) series - but be prepared to dig deep to afford one. The E-types (1962 to 1973) have been rising steadily after several years of holding a fairly uniform price during the 1980s and 1990s. Of course the earlier Jaguar sedans are also collectors' pieces. Like the sportsters, they are very expensive to overhaul, but attractive and emotive cars to own.

Also see: Jaguar Heritage | Swallow Sidecars - The William Lyons Story | Jaguar - A Racing Pedigree
Jaguar SS100  

Jaguar SS100

1936
While not pioneering any technical innovation that characterised the post-war Jaguar models, no one could deny the SS100's fine performance, handling, styling, build quality and competitive price. More>>
Jaguar Mk.V  

Jaguar Mk.V

1948 - 1951
At the 1948 Motor Show, Jaguar was to unveil both the Mk. V and XK 120 - the first new design post war Jaguars. The Mk. V was available with either a 2.5 litre or 3.5 litre engine, the smaller capacity 2.5 being the "entry" model for the Mk V range. More>>
Jaguar XK120  

Jaguar XK120

1948 - 1954
Designed to be a low-volume dream car rather than a high production motor car, the Jaguar XK120/140/150 became an overnight sensation and highly profitable. More>>
Jaguar XK140  

Jaguar XK140

1954 - 1957
The new Jaguar XK140 featured similar body pressings as the XK120, but the doors were now 3 inches longer as the engine, bulkhead and windscreen had been moved forward to improve the interior space. More>>
Jaguar D-Type  

Jaguar D-Type

1955 - 1957
Although Jaguar were to leave racing at the end of 1956, private teams would continue to enjoy success driving the D-Type. At the 1957 Le Mans, D-Types were to finish first, second, third, fourth and sixth! A great success, but without the arch rival Mercedes-Benz perhaps not terribly suprising. More>>
Jaguar Mk. VIII  

Jaguar Mk. VIII

1956 - 1959
The 1956 - 1959 Jaguar Mark VIII was a slightly heavier replacement for the Mark VII/VIIM sedans. It featured minor styling changes and more power, but was otherwise the same. More>>
Jaguar XK150  

Jaguar XK150

1957 - 1960
The interior of the XK150 featured walnut veneer on the dashboard, while mechanically one of the main changes were the Dunlop disc brakes now fitted both ends, replacing the previous disc/drum setup. More>>
Jaguar Mk. X  

Jaguar Mk. X

1961 - 1970
This car still holds the title as being the broadest British production saloon being 1.93 metres across its rear. It offered independent suspension and power-steering and was half the price of its rivals. More>>
Jaguar Mk. II  

Jaguar Mk. II

1961 - 1975
The Mk. II was the last proper sports saloon made by Jaguar and became somewhat of a 60's icon. Quiet, comfortable and stately in appearance, under the Mk. II bonet lay an eager and impressive motor capable of 201 km/h in 3.8 litre form. More>>
Jaguar E-Type  

Jaguar E-Type

1961 - 1975
This car was arguably the most beautiful sportscar of the 1960's with its cool aerodynamics and unashamed showmanship. More>>
Bertone Jaguar Pirana  

Bertone Jaguar Pirana

1967
Although the Bertone Jaguar Pirana was never intended to be more than a concept car, it was a fully functioning vehicle worthy of supercar status, and more importantly was completed in record time using parts already available courtesy of an E-Type donor car. More>>
Jaguar XJ6  

Jaguar XJ6

1968 - 1987
The XJ6 was launched in 1968 with a design that boasted ride comfort, quietness and great road-handling. It was a front-engined, rear-wheel drive, coil-sprung saloon and had a ride that was softer and quieter than a Rolls Royce. More>>
Jaguar XJS

Jaguar XJS

1975 - 1991
Launched as the replacement for the E-type in 1975, and available in either coupe or convertible format, the XJ-S is now getting the recognition it deserves. More>>
Jaguar XJ Series 3

Jaguar XJ Series III

1979- 1992
Jaguar's of the 1970's were never perfect. Like all others, there were design and manufacturing weaknesses. They had problems and failures. But compared with their international rivals, Jaguar's XJ saloons were unrivalled. Bob Knight was the chief architect of the original XJ chassis, and by the time the Series III was released, he had been promoted to Jaguar's Managing Director. More>>
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