Lancia Reviews and Road Tests

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Lancia

Founded by Vincenzo Lancia who launched the popular Lambda at the Paris and London car shows of 1922. Lancia would pass in 1937, but not before overseeing the continued improvement of the Lambda, and leaving behind the wonderful Aprilia saloon. After World War 2 the company hired Vittoria Jano, an ex Alfa Romeo designer.Togther with Lancia's son Gianni, the two would embark upon a program of innovation and design which included the wonderful V6 powered Aurelia B10. The company reached a high point in rally racing with the release of the Stratos.

Also see: Lancia History

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Lancia Aurelia GT  

Lancia Aurelia GT

1951 - 1956
At the Turin motor show of 1950, Lancia introduced a typically innovative new saloon, the B-10 Aurelia. While it continued Lancia's traditional sliding-pillar independent front suspension, and Lancia's equally traditional mono-constructed bodyshell, the car had as well a new system of independent rear suspension by semi-trailing arms, rear-mounted clutch/gearbox/differential, and the world's first production V6 engine. More>>
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Lancia Flaminia  

Lancia Flaminia

1957 - 1970
A brilliant looking car built in very small numbers by Lancia was the Flaminia convertible. Launched in 1958, the Flaminia featured a 2458cc V6 engine that developed a healthy 140 bhp. The Flaminia (which replaced the Aurelia) was specially developed as a six-seater for the wealthy.  As such, it was one of the most expensive Italian cars then available, and was therefore much favoured by politicians and film stars. More>>
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Lancia Flaminia GT / GTL / Convertible  

Lancia Flaminia GT/GTL/Convertible

1958 - 1965
Carrozzeria Touring designed and built the beautiful aluminium bodied two-door Flaminias, these being easily distinguished by their four round headlights (rather than two on Pininfarina Flaminias), and a shorter cabin - the wheelbase was decreased significantly for the GT and Convertibile, allowing for only two seats to be mounted. The GT was a coupé, while the Convertibile was obviously a cabriolet version (with optional hardtop). More>>
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Lancia Flavia  

Lancia Flavia

1960 - 1970
Refinement, performance, sophistication. The Flavia had bucket loads of personality, and just enough quirks and foibles to remind you that you were driving an Italian car. That was always part of the experience. Those that couldn't appreciate a car with personality would never have stopped by at their local Lancia dealer, which was probably a good thing. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia Coupe  

Lancia Fulvia Coupe

1965 - 1973
Look under the bonnet and you would see where the money went. In many aspects of the car's character, the Fulvia coupe could be likened to a precision watch. The exclusive styling attracted a lot of attention and the practical package size made it a terrific car around town. But out on the open road, its true breeding would begin to show and the coupe would become a fast touring car with few rivals. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF  

Lancia Fulvia 1.6HF

1968 - 1969
As far as the Fulvia goes, the 1.6 HF was seen to be the best. It boasted two world championships and was capable of reaching 184 km/h. More>>
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Lancia Stratos Bertone Zero Prototype  

Lancia Stratos Bertone Zero Prototype

1970
The Lancia Stratos HF prototype was a styling exercise by Bertone, first show at the Turin Motor show in October 1970. It was a futuristic design with a wedge shaped profile and stood just 33 inches (84 cm) from the ground. It was so low, that conventional doors where not used. Instead, drivers had to flip up the windscreen and walk into the car, to gained entry. More>>
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Lancia Fulvia 1300 Coupe S3  

Lancia Fulvia 1300 Coupe S3

1973 - 1976
The Lancia Fulvia 1300 was not a car for an unsympathetic (read lazy) driver, simply because of the need to use the gearbox and engine energetically. It was instead a fabulously rewarding little car for a good driver. More>>
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Lancia Stratos  

Lancia Stratos

1973 - 1975
Lancia took a rather novel course with the design of their Stratos - instead of the more conventional scheme of transforming a "Gran Turismo" into a competition machine, the new model was a competition car adapted for road use and destined for rally work. More>>
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Giovanni Michelotti Lancia Beta Mizar  

Giovanni Michelotti Lancia Beta Mizar

1975
Few would argue that, in the mid 1970s, Italian designers reigned supreme, by virtue of their stranglehold on innovative, practical styling. Manufacturers beat a path to their doors from America, Japan, Australia, Korea, and many major European producers – even Communist bloc car-makers sought out the Italian design studios. More>>
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Lancia Beta Coupe  

Lancia Beta Coupe

1975 - 1984
Style and performance were not all that this suave Italian offered, the fuel economy usually bettering 30 mpg on a country trip and not much under when in heavy traffic. Yes, the Lancia was not without its faults, but it featured beautiful lines, great all-round performance and quickly became a very desirable machine. More>>
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Lancia Montecarlo  

Lancia Montecarlo

1975 - 1982
From Italy, sired by the huge Fiat conglomerate, the two-seater, mid-engined, Lancia Beta Montecarlo appeared - finally a mid-engined sports car for the masses! An almost "ugly-but-beautiful", low and stubby design stamped front and rear by the US-mandatory, impact-absorbing bumpers/body-work. More>>
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Lancia Gamma Coupe  

Lancia Gamma Coupe

1976 - 1984
When the Gamma arrived in 1977 it seemed something of a departure for the Italian company. Part of the answer to this lay in the fact that Lancia was part of the Fiat group, and had been since 1969; the Lancia name had always had connotations of quality and prestige, it seemed a good idea for the new Fiat 'flagship' which replaced the old Fiat 130 to have the Lancia stamp. More>>
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Lancia Delta  

Lancia Delta (series 1)

1979 - 1983
Lancia's small hatchback, code-named Epsilon but renamed Delta after months of introduction delay due to the strikes that paralysed Italian industry, could well be regarded as a cousin to Fiat's Ritmo/Strada. Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, the Delta was, for a period of time, also sold in Sweden by Saab Automobile, badged as the Saab 600. More>>
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Lancia Rally  

Lancia Rally

1982
There's was little more than a family resemblance to the Beta Monte Carlo in the Lancia Rally, built in a limited series of 200 to make it eligible for Group B commpetition. More>>
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Lancia Thema  

Lancia Thema

1984 - 1994
During the mid-1980's the Fiat group began to rationalise it chassis/platforms so that the same body could be used on different Fiat, Alfa Romeo and Lancia models. More>>
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Lancia Delta S4

Lancia Delta S4

1985
Sadly, during the 1986 Corsica Rally, driver Henri Toivonen and navigator Sergio Cresto were killed in their S4. Resultant FIA findings saw the termination of Group B rally cars - deemed to be too powerful and dangerous. The Lancia Delta S4 became the most outstanding rally car in history not to win a world title. More>>
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