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Triumph

Motorcycle manufacturer since 1902, Triumph diversified into the manufacture of automobiles from 1923. Became extremely popular after World War II with its Spitfire and TR series. Best known for the sporty open-top roadsters, notable saloon models included the Herald and Dolomite.

Collector Notes: Triumph started its post-war series of cars with a most unusual 1948 Roadster, with a three-passenger seat and three windscreen wipers. It had a 1.8-litre four-cylinder engine. Later came a series of Herald models, including a semi-sporting convertible version introduced in 1960. The Spitfire, a fiery little road-runner, ran from 1963 to 1969, with the Mark II coming in 1966 and the Mark III in 1969. The TR series started in 1954, the TR2 having a 2.0-litre engine. The TR3 followed in late 1955, the TR4 in 1962, the TR4A in 1965, the TR5 in 1967, followed by the TR6 in 1969. All are highly collectable.

Also see: Lost Marques - The History of Triumph Motor Cars
Triumph Dolomite Supercharged Straight 8  

Triumph Dolomite Supercharged Straight 8

1934
The supercharged straight-eight showed tremendous promise, both in its specification and its forceful, purposeful looks - but it fizzled out after only three cars and six engines had been built. Two cars were sold, each with a guaranteed top speed of 100 mph in full touring trim; the third was written off when a train hit it in the Monte Carlo Rally. More>>
Triumph 1800/2000 Roadster  

Triumph 1800/2000 Roadster

1946 - 1949
First unveiled in 1946 the Triumph 1800 Roadster was created from a strange cocktail of pre-war styling with classic 50's detailing. The new model shared its mechanical items with the 1800 saloon including a column shift gearchange. More>>
Triumph TR2  

Triumph TR2, TR3 and TR3A

1953 - 1962
In 1952 the Type 20TS (often referred to as the TR1) is introduced at Earl's Court Motor Show. Built on a prewar Standard chassis and sporting a dual-carb version of the Standard Vanguard engine, this show car looked much like the TR2s and TR3s that later followed. More>>
Triumph Italia  

Triumph Italia

1957 - 1959
In 1957 Triumph took Giovanni Michelotti of Turin under contract. He was a fertile stylist in the Italian manner, and his first design on a TR3 chassis appeared at the Geneva show the same year. Later he designed the bodies of the Triumph Herald and Triumph Spitfire. More>>
Triumph Herald  

Triumph Herald

1959 - 1970
The Coupe was never really intended to be a proper 4 seater, the rear seat being available only as an option. But the similarities with other British sports cars was soon evident, such as the four speed gearbox, 948 cc engine fitted with twin SU H1 carbys and an output of 42 bhp. More>>
Triumph Vitesse  

Triumph Herald Vitesse

1962 - 1971
When the Leyland Group took over Standard-Triumph in 1962 the revolutionary Herald was in full production, as was the six-cylinder Vanguard. We have read some old press clippings and a common theme were those that said what a delightful car could be made by putting a Vanguard six into the 'all-independent (and separate) Herald chassis' - and we bet few ever thought it would actually happen. More>>
Triumph Spitfire  

Triumph Spitfire

1962 - 1980
This beautiful little sports car was styled by the Italian stylist Michelotti. Initially based on the Triumph Herald mechanicals the Spitfire competed successfully in rallies in Europe and was raced in North America. More>>
Triumph TR4/5  

Triumph TR4/5

1962 - 1969
Triumph's new-generation sports car with body design by Italy's Giovanni Michelotti. Originally based on the TR3A chassis and running gear with a larger engine (though the 1991cc unit was available optionally to qualify for 2.0-liter class racing) and new all-synchromesh gearbox. More>>
Triumph 1300  

Triumph 1300

1965 - 1970
Taking the fight up to BMC Mini and Austin/Morris 1100 was never going to be an easy job, and so Leyland's first foray into front wheel drive automobiles needed to be a good one. More>>
Triumph GT6  

Triumph GT6

1966 - 1973
Released in 1966, the Triumph GT6 quickly became known as the poor-mans E-Type. Featuring a lovely sleek fastback body, the GT6 may have looked a little like the Spitfire, where its origins obviously lay, but in fact all the major body panels were new. More>>
Triumph GT6  

Triumph Herald 13/60

1967 - 1971
The last derivative of the successful Herald range appeared in 1967, the Herald 13/60. The 13/60, as the name suggests, used a 1300 (1296cc), 60 (61bhp) engine shared with the Spitfire. This lively little engine ensured that the Herald could still keep its sporty, economical performance that had made it so popular when it first appeared. More>>
Triumph TR6  

Triumph TR6

1969 - 1976
The TR6 was a refined sports car. It featured pile carpeting of floors and trunk, plush-looking bucket seats, a wood dash and the usual full complement of instruments. More>>
Triumph Stag  

Triumph Stag

1970 - 1977
The Stag started life some time around 1964 as a Triumph 2000 (Triumphs family saloon) and was styled by Giovanni Michelotti. More>>
Triumph Dolomite  

Triumph Dolomite

1972 - 1980
When it was released the Dolomite was warmly received in Britain – but less so in Australia. It was not a revolutionary car, rather being very conventional, but it did offer a pleasant combination of adequate performance, good finish, reasonable accommodation and excellent handling. More>>
Triumph Dolomite Sprint  

Triumph Dolomite Sprint

1973 - 1980
Arguably the best model to come from British Leyland is the Triumph Dolomite Sprint. The Sprint was a true sports saloon and offered incredible performance that is impressive even by today's standards. More>>
Triumph 2500TC  

Triumph 2500TC

1974 - 1977
The Triumph 2500TC and 2000TC were introduced by British Leyland following continued problems with the previous models fuel injection system. In what could only be considered a backward step, the new model Triumph dropped fuel injection and instead used (what Triumph knew was tried and tested) a twin carb configuration. More>>
Triumph TR7

Triumph TR7

1975 - 1981
The Triumph TR7 can represent good buying to the classic car enthusiast. Why?, well the reliability and quality control problems that dogged the car during its production life should be well sorted by now. More>>
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