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British and European Car Spotters Guide - 1930

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1930 British and European Car Spotters Guide

The Birth of Popular Motoring



Many people do not understand the reason why 1930's cars differed so completely from their "vintage" predecessors of the 1920's. The cars of the 1930's were developed in response to a change in economic conditions, and a change in expectations. In 1930, just one million cars were in use in Britain, but eight years later the two million mark had been passed. In less than a decade, therefore, the entire motoring scene had been transformed. Many more people, and a different type of people at that, had started to motor. Truly, in almost every possible way, the 1930's witnessed The Birth of Popular Motoring.

In 1930, many motorists were relatively well off, ran mainly hand-built and often rather large-engined cars, and were a class-conscious lot. Many of their cars had coachbuilt bodies, and they treated their annual visit to the Olympia Motor Show as something of a social occasion. The world was diving into Depression, prices were falling, unemployment was rising rapidly, and the motor industry was struggling hard to cut its costs and broaden its appeal. Cars were beginning to get more complex, and building them by hand made less and less business sense.

By 1939, much of this had changed. There were twice as many motorists as there had been in 1930, many with much smaller incomes than would ever have been possible to justify running a car in 1930. Most of the "new motorists" ran tiny, cheap-to-buy, cars, built right down to a price by mechanised factories. Pressed steel body shells were now normal, and even unit-construction body/chassis units had arrived. The Earls Court Motor Show (not held in 1939) was a big selling jamboree for British auto manufacturers. Most of Europe was bracing itself against the onset of another World War, prices were edging up again, unemployment was trending downwards, and great tracts of the country were enjoying unparalleled prosperity. The motor industry had been modernised, sales and production had doubled in the UK alone to 379,000 in 1937, and exports were up by three times (again, quoting UK figures, to 78,000 in 1937).

The Australian motoring scene was one of imports, or locally assembled imports. Outside the USA it was a decade which began with Austin and Morris dominating sales - between them, they sold nearly three in every five new cars - with the rest trailing well behind. The Austin Seven, the Morris Minor, the Austin 12s and Morris Cowleys, the Austin 16s and the Morris Oxfords were the most popular of all new cars. There were still lots of independent concerns, but not many were selling cars in quantity. Prices were falling, fast, but not many cheapies had any sporting pretensions. In that respect, at least, Cecil Kimber's MG M-Type Midget was a real trend-setter.

By the end of the 1930s the motoring scene was very different. Austin and Morris had merely stood still - or, in many ways, actually slipped back. In the meantime, four concerns had expanded mightily, and the Big Six had established itself. Ford had moved to Dagenham and introduced the immortal Y-Type 8hp model, Vauxhall, under General Motors, had become mass producers, with unit-construction cars like the 10s, 12s and 14s of 1938-1939, John Black had revitalised Standard, and inspired the distinctive "Flying" models, while the Rootes family had welded Hillman, Humber, Sunbeam and Talbot into the Rootes Group.

It was a decade in which some famous names disappeared, and in which very few new ones were founded. The only major new marque to appear in the United Kingdom was Jaguar, born out of SS in 1935, a company which had itself only been born in 1931. Sunbeam-Talbot, theoretically, was a new marque, but in Rootes' hands such cars were really only tarted up Hillmans and Humbers; puritans, and traditionalists, wept at the thought. Allard and Jensen, of course, were new in the 1930's, and lived for many more years, but never built cars in large numbers, while little companies like Railton and Lagonda, not to mention Aston Martin, never truly survived the war in the same form.

The depression of 1931 swept away Bentley (taken over by Rolls-Royce), Lanchester (absorbed by BSA-Daimler), and killed off Swift (which died completely). It nearly accounted for Rover, who achieved an astonishing recovery before 1939, it damaged Singer so badly that they never recovered, and as a sequel it probably made the demise of Sunbeam and Talbot (as parts of the STD combine) fairly certain. Lea-Francis spent time in the hands of the Receiver, and out of the showrooms. Riley went bankrupt in 1938, and were bought up by Lord Nuffield, while Triumph followed them in 1939, and came back in 1946 purely as a name.

Another brief flash of statistics sums it up - there were 44 marques at Olympia in 1930 (among them, names like GWK, Rhode, Whitlock and Calthorpe), but there would only have been 36 at the 1939 Earls Court Show which was cancelled due to Hitler's interference. In the nine years which intervened, only 27 marques showed the continuity to be present at both occasions. Traditionalists, epitomised by the "Vintage" enthusiasts, averred that no good cars were built after the end of 1930, which was the sort of plonking statement of which a Gamesman/Lifeman like Stephen Potter would have been proud. What they really meant is that hand-built cars of the sort they liked, preferably with tourer bodies, mostly lacking almost every creature comfort, often requiring considerable skill to be driven, and mostly costing hundreds of pounds more than the "new" motorists wanted to pay, were rapidly disappearing. That this was so because they could no longer be sold was not admitted to, or thought significant.

In 1930, more cars with 15hp engines or over were being sold than cars with engines in the 8hp, 9hp and 10hp bracket - 40% against 36%. In 1939, on the other hand, there had been something of a social revolution: 63% of all new cars were in the 8hp to 10hp sector, while 15s and over accounted for only 13%. It all came about because the manufacturers recognised the social changes taking place, spotted the new "middle class" as their battleground when the Depression let up, and made sure that the new cars suited them. Every firm with any sense, and a modicum of financial backing, went in for mechanisation. If they couldn't afford to build their own new-fangled pressed steel body shells, they rushed to specialists like Pressed Steel who would willingly supply their needs. All, without exception, recognised that they needed a car for all pockets, and - by juggling with engines, bores and strokes - could cover most eventualities.

The price of the true quantity-production cars didn't change much throughout the period - an Austin 10 sold in 1932 sold for £155 whereas the 1939 equivalent cost £175 - but those of middle-class and sporting models fell considerably, which brought them within the range of many more buyers. People like William Lyons upset everyone by offering such staggering value for money with the SS and SS-Jaguar models of the period but it was Rootes, Vauxhall and Standard who played the low-price "permutations game" so ruthlessly and so well. In 1939, for instance, a 3-litre Sunbeam Talbot was listed at £415, while the equivalent 1930 Talbot "75" cost £585, and that was a great deal of difference in 1930's currency, when the average industrial wage was £3 a week, and a middle-manager would be happy to be earning little more than £10 a week.

In spite of the fact that the average price of all British cars came down sharply until the mid 1930's, then began to creep up again once more, and in spite of the fact that the Europeans usually made faster and more excitingly engineered models, the pace of technical change was considerable. A car of 1930 had very square lines, and often used a composite-construction coachbuilt body shell without a boot; during the period, lines became more rounded, active attempts at "styling" were made, luggage boots were incorporated, widths increased, and all-steel shells became the norm. The true unit-construction pioneered in the United States travelled across the Atlantic later in the decade - Vauxhall took it up first, but Morris and Rootes were not far behind.

Engines took on overhead valves, but were always hampered by the RAC's "horsepower rating" which effectively condemned them to be of long-stroke type. Four speed gearboxes, with synchromesh, were de rigeur by 1939. In 1930, synchromesh had not even arrived in Europe (Vauxhall, once again, would be first), many cars only had three speeds, and most ratios were not even in constant mesh. Even in suspension, the area in which we lagged so badly behind the Europeans, there were advances. Almost any car of 1930 had half-elliptic springs and a beam front axle, but by 1939 a good many had independent front suspension. Not that this effete tendency got through to many sports cars sold at a competitive price. Even at the end of the 1930's, no MG Midget, HRG, Riley orTriumph had independent front suspension.

On the other hand, splendid flagships like the 4i-litre Bentleys ("The Silent Sports Car", as advertised), the vee-12 Lagondas, and the six-cylinder Alvis sporting cars, had taken to the modern equipment. Cars at both ends of the social spectrum were joining in - from the extremes of the Standard Flying Eight, to the Rolls-Royce Phantom III. Not many of these fine cars, incidentally, were all that fast. In any year, it was something of a miracle if The Autocar or The Motor road tested a car with a genuine 10Omph maximum, and most middle-sized, middle-class touring machines were hard-put to exceed 75 to 80mph. The sports cars, of course, usually led the way - an M-Type Midget struggled to 60mph, while a TB Midget costing only £40 more could nudge 80mph on a good day.

Their ride, incidentally, is often a great disappointment to today's classic car enthusiasts. The fact was, of course, that British roads were in excellent condition in the 1930's (probably better, in terms of maintenance and contour, than they are today), which made hard suspension acceptable, and it was also a fact that standards had advanced quite a way from the 1920's. It was only the occasional continental car which managed to prove that soft suspension could also result in good handling, but our engineers took years to catch up. It was the marketing men, however, as much as the engineers, who were so conventional Some firms were at pains never to be seen to have advanced ideas (It was not until the mid-1930's, for instance, that the first sloping-windscreen Austin was ever built), while others moved forward cautiously (Riley offered a modern "waterfall" grille, or the option of a traditional honeycomb, on their Sprite sports car, for instance); radical changes were often delayed for years while the tycoons in charge agonised over the implications.

Dr Porsche's VW Beetle, for instance, would never have been accepted in Britain, in the 1930's, while in Europe a staid and old-fashioned car like the Armstrong-Siddeley would have died off years earlier than it did. You only have to look at the overall policy governing cars like British Daimler, and German Daimler-Benz (which had started from the same root, many years earlier), to see our problem. Nevertheless, cars built in Britain in the 1930's were aimed squarely at the British market, for British tastes, and on the evidence of their sale, they were successful enough. In the next four issues, I will be analysing one particular market group in more detail.

1930 saw the introduction of the Hillman Wizard aimed at world markets. Although not an outstanding success the Rootes brothers persevered and 1932 saw the introduction of the Hillman Minx which was to be produced in various marks over four decades. More companies were acquired - Karrier Motors were in receivership in 1934 and were soon snapped up, while the next year STD Motors, which comprised of Sunbeam and Clement-Talbot was added. Rootes were keen to keep the marque identities going and "badge engineering" was adopted on some of the products. All the various builders were still going in some form at the take over by Chrysler. Humber was associated with the luxury market, Sunbeam; sports cars, and Hillman long-lasting quality.

British Car Production for 1930



During the 1930 model year, ending in September, the British motor industry produced 236,528 motor vehicles, of which 169,669 were private cars and taxis. By September, the total number of cars in use was 1,177,872 including 102,791 which were registered as 'hackneys' (a hackney cariage is a vehicle which stands or plies for hire in the street, eg: a Taxi-Cab). During the 1930 calendar year 155,707 new cars were registered in just under 40 (horse power rating) classes. The highest number was the 8 HP class, namely 40,272. Next were 12 HP with 24,805, 15 HP with 22,282, 16 HP with 17,701 and 10 HP with 11,190. All the others contained well under ten thousand. A total of just under 30,000 vehicles were exported, namely 23,209 cars and 6,770 commercial vehicles. Their combined value was about £6.7 million. Car imports numbered 9,751, valued at just over £1.5 million.
1930 AC 16/56 Magna
UK

AC 16/56 Magna

  Also see: AC Road Tests and Reviews
 
AC (Acedes) Cars Ltd. of Thames Ditton, Surrey, offered two chassis, namely the 16/40 Royal with 9 ft. 5 and a quarter inch wheelbase and the 16/56 Magna with 9 ft. 11 and a quarter inch wheelbase. The 16/56 Magna shown left is the Aceca Coupe Cabrolet based on the latter. It cost £475 and like the 16/40 had a 1991cc (65 x 100mm) six cylinder engine, rated at 15.7 HP. The AC was shod with 5.50 x 19 tyres.
1930 Alvis Straight Eight 1 ½ Litre <a href=front wheel drive Racer" width="270" height="180" border="0">
UK

Alvis Straight Eight 1 ½ Litre front wheel drive Racer

  Also see: Alvis Road Tests and Reviews
 
Alvis Straight-Eight 1 ½-Litre Supercharged Front-Wheel Drive racer, photographed at Brooklands about 1931, although we believe this to be a 1930 model. The driver was Thomas Dowling and the passenger was the car's owner, Ernie Coleman. In the 1930 TT the Alvis team swept their class in first second and third position and only failed to beat the Alfa Romeo 1750s for outright victory. The FA 8/15 eight-cylinder engine had a cubic capacity of 1491 cc (55 x 78·5 mm) and developed 95 bhp at 5500 rpm. It had an overhead camshaft two magnetos and a multi-plate clutch with four-speed gearbox ahead of the engine.
1930 Austin Seven

 

UK

Austin Seven

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Austin Seven was first introduced in 1922 and continued until 1939 with periodic changes and improvements. Throughout this timespan, during which over 1 million were sold, the engine remained basically the same: four-cylinder side-valve, 747·5-cc (56 x 76 mm), RAC rating 7·8 HP. Pictured left is a 1930 Saloon model.

 

1930 Austin Seven 2 Seater

 

UK

Austin Seven 2 Seater

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The 1930 Austin Seven Two-Seater sold at £130, including electric starting, lighting and horn, shock absorbers, air strangler, etc.

 


1930 Austin Seven Coupe
UK

Austin Seven Coupe

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The 1930 Austin Seven Coupe had two seats and cost £140 (with sliding sunshine roof £5 extra). 'A dainty model that has made a very strong appeal to lady motorists', the sales catalogue claimed.
1930 Austin Seven Coupe
UK

Austin Seven Swallow

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The 1930 Austin/Swallow Saloon consisted of the standard Austin Seven chassis with special bodywork produced by the Swallow Side Car & Coach Building Co. of Blackpool (later Jaguar Cars of Coventry). It's a little hard to see, but there is a V-shaped windscreen and slotted wheel stud holes. Swallow special coachwork was fitted also on other chassis, including Morris Cowley, Standard Big Nine, and Swift Ten.
1930 Austin 16HP
UK

Austin 16HP

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
For 1930 the Austin 16 HP six-cylinder was offered with new Open Road Five-Seater bodywork at £325. Wheelbase was 9 ft 4 in, engine 2249-cc (65·5 x 111 mm) 36-bhp side-valve, rated at 15,9 HP.
1930 Austin Twenty
UK

Austin Twenty

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
Austin Twenty Ranelagh Enclosed Limousine was one of the Company's most expensive models, selling at £630 (£640 with sliding roof). Wheelbase was 11 ft 4 in. Chassis was also available with 10ft 10 in wheelbase. Car was powered by a 3400cc (79·5 x 114·5 mm) 49-bhp side-valve Six rated at 23·5 HP.
1930 Bentley 4 ½ Litre
UK

Bentley 4 ½ Litre

  Also see: Bentley Road Tests and Reviews
 
Bentley produced 4 ½ and 6 ½ Litre chassis. Shown is the famous 4½-Litre Supercharged model which had an OHC four-cylinder engine of 4398-cc capacity (100 x 140 mm). The supercharger, with twin SU carburettors, was fitted in front of the engine and radiator. Wheelbase was 10ft 10 in. tyre size 6.00-21.
1930 Ford Model A (F)
UK

Ford Model A (F)

  Also see: Ford UK Road Tests and Reviews
 
Ford Models A and AF were assembled at the company's Trafford Park, Manchester, factory from 1928 until 1931, following tens of thousands of Model Ts The Model A was virtually identical to the American parent car, differing mainly in having right-hand drive. The engine was a 3285-cc (98·4 x 108 mm) side-valve Four, rated at 24 HP. For those customers who wanted more economy, including lower HP tax rating, there was the 14·9 HP Model AF which had 77·6-mm bore but was otherwise similar. The AF had a cubic capacity of 2043 cc. Actual power output of the two engines was 40 bhp at 2200 rpm and 28 at 2600 respectively. Both cars had three-speed gearbox. 8 ft 7 ½ in wheelbase. 4.75-19 tyres on wire wheels and a transversal leaf spring for each axle.
1930 Hillman Straight 8
UK

Hillman Straight 8

  Also see: Hillman Car Reviews and World Land Speed Records
 
Hillman Straight 8 was new for 1930 and was powered by a 2620-cc (63 x 105 mm) 52·5-bhp eight-cylinder in-line engine. Shown with the new car are Major Sir Henry Segrave, world land speed record holder. and Captain Irving, then Technical Director of the Hillman-Humber-Commer Combine (later known as Rootes Group).
1930 Humber 16/50
UK

Humber 16/50

  Also see: Humber Road Tests and Reviews
 
Humber Tourer was available on 16/50 and Snipe 10ft wheelbase chassis at £425 and £495 respectively.
1930 Humber Pullman
UK

Humber Pullman

  Also see: Humber Road Tests and Reviews
 
Humber top-line Pullman range was available with Limousine. Landaulette and Cabriolet De Ville bodywork. The latter sold at £1095, the other two at £775. The chassis was available at £495. Pictured left is a Pullman Landaulette. The 3·5- Litre six-cylinder engine developed 72 bhp and was rated at 23·8 HP.
1930 Invicta 4 ½ Litre Standard
UK

Invicta 4 ½ Litre Standard

  Also see: Lost Marques...Invicta
 
Invicta 4½-Litre Standard Model had 1OO-bhp 29·1 HP six-cylinder OHV engine of 4467-cc cubic capacity (88·5 x 120·6 mm) with twin SU carburettors. Wheelbase was 10ft 6 in. The Rudge-Whitworth wire wheels had 31 x 6 tyres. Standard chassis sold at £680, with saloon bodywork £795. Invicta Cars had their works at The Fairmile, Cobham, Surrey.
1930 Invicta 4 ½ Litre Sports
UK

Invicta 4 ½ Litre Sports

  Also see: Lost Marques...Invicta
 
Invicta 4½ Litre Sports Model was basically similar to the Standard Model, modified mainly in respect of height. The chassis was upswept at the front and underslung at the rear, with a wheelbase of 9 ft 10in. Radiator and dashboard were modified to suit. Other modifications included different springs, gear ratios, etc.
1930 Jowett 7HP
UK

Jowett 7HP

 
 
Jowett supplied rugged little tourers, vans and other types, which were powered by a water-cooled horizontally-opposed twin-cylinder engine. This engine was in production for over 40 years, from 1910/11. Pictured left is one of a fleet of special four-seater Battery Staff Cars delivered around the beginning of the decade to a York firm of military vehicle fleet hirers.
1930 Lagonda 3 Litre Special
UK

Lagonda 3 Litre Special

  Also see: Lost Marques...Lagonda
 
Lagonda produced four-cylinder 14/60 and six-cylinder 16/65 and 3-Litre models.
1930 Lea-Francis 12/40
UK

Lea-Francis 12/40

 
 
Lea-Francis 12/40 Type V with Weymann Sportsman's Coupe bodywork sold at £420 and sported two side-mounted spare wheels. Engine was a 1496-cc (69 x 100 mm) OHV Four, developing 38 bhp at 3800 rpm.
1930 MG 18/80
UK

MG 18/80

  Also see: MG Road Tests and Reviews
 
MG 18/80 had an 80-bhp 2468-cc (69 x 110 mm) six-cylinder OHC engine with twin SU carburettors. It was designed entirely by MG, rather than based on a modified Morris chassis like the Company's smaller models. Some 750 18/80s were built with various open and closed body styles Mk I models (from late 1928) had a three-speed gearbox, Mk II models (1929-32) had a four-speed gearbox, improved brakes, sturdier chassis, etc.
1930 Morgan Super Sports Aero
UK

Morgan Super Sports Aero

  Also see: Morgan Road Tests and Reviews
 
Morgan three-wheelers were available with 980-cc air-cooled and 1078- and 1096-cc water-cooled V-twin engines. All had 2-speed gearbox, shaft and chain final drive and 6-ft wheelbase. Prices ranged from £87 10s to £145.
1930 Morris Cowley
UK

Morris Cowley

  Also see: Morris Road Tests and Reviews
 
Morris Cowley was a popular rugged model with 1550-cc (69.5 x 102 mm) four-cylinder engine rated at 11·9 HP. The spiral bevel rear axle was driven through a multiplate clutch with cork insets and a three-speed gearbox. Tyres were 4.40-27 on steel spoke wheels. Wheelbase was 8 ft 9 in. The chassis cost £130, prices of complete cars ranged from £162 to £200. Shown is a Drophead Coupe with dickey seat.
1930 Morris Isis Six
UK

Morris Isis Six

  Also see: Morris Road Tests and Reviews
 
Morris Isis Six was top-line model with 17·7 HP 2468-cc (69 x 110 mm) 6-cylinder OHC engine Chassis price was £295, complete cars cost from £375 to £399. The wire wheels had 5.50-19 tyres. Wheelbase was 9 ft 6 in.
1930 Morris Minor
UK

Morris Minor

  Also see: Morris Road Tests and Reviews
 
Morris Minor was first made in 1929 with two-door Saloon and Tourer bodywork. From 1930 a 5-cwt van variant was available. The engine was an 847-cc (57 x 83 mm) OHC unit with three-speed gearbox. The same basic engine was used in the contemporary MG M-type Midget.
1930 Rolls-Royce 20/25 HP with Four-Door Four-light Saloon body
UK

Rolls-Royce 20/25 HP with Four-Door Four-light Saloon body

  Also see: Rolls-Royce Road Tests and Reviews
 
Rolls-Royce 20/25 HP with Four-door Four-light Saloon bodyywork by Arthur Mulliner Ltd. of Northampton. The 20/25 HP chassis had a wheelbase of 10ft 9 in and was priced at £1185. Engine was a 3680-cc (82 x 114 mm) OHV Six, rated at 25·3 HP. Tyre size was 6.50-19. Note the side lights, incorporated in the forward end of the wings.
1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Belgian Van Den Plas
UK

Rolls-Royce Phantom II Belgian Van Den Plas

  Also see: Rolls-Royce Road Tests and Reviews
 
Rolls- Royce Phantom II chassis with Belgian Van Den Plas bodywork. The Phantom II had 6.75-21 tyres and a 7668-cc (107·95 x 140 mm) six-cylinder OHV engine, rated at 43·3 HP.
1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II chassis with Colonial Tourer Type Coachwork
UK

Rolls-Royce Phantom II chassis with Colonial Tourer Type coachwork

  Also see: Rolls-Royce Road Tests and Reviews
 
Rolls-Royce Phantom II chassis with 'Colonial' tourer-type bodywork. The chassis prices were £1850 (SWB) and £1950 (LWB).
1930 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Hooper Coachwork
UK

Rolls-Royce Phantom II Hooper Coachwork

  Also see: Rolls-Royce Road Tests and Reviews
 
A Rolls-Royce Phantom II was used by Emperor Haile Selassie to head the state drive to church on Sundays. The coachwork was specially designed and made by Hooper and incorporated an extension seat for attendant Abyssinian warriors.
1930 Rover Light Six
UK

Rover Light Six

  Also see: Rover Road Tests and Reviews
 
Rover Light Six Saloon had six-light Weymann body on 8 ft 10 in wheelbase chassis with 15.7 HP six-cylinder OHV engine. Gearbox was three-speed, tyre size 5.00-19. Other 1930 Rovers included 10/25, Two- Litre and Meteor models.
1930 Singer Junior
UK

Singer Junior

  Also see: Singer Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Singer Junior Saloon sold for £160 in 1930. The Junior had an 848-cc (56 x 86 mm) OHC four-cylinder engine of 7·78 HP and three-speed gearbox.
1930 Singer Junior
UK

Singer Junior

  Also see: Singer Road Tests and Reviews
 
Singer with a mascot. The St. Denys Sisters, well-known Music Hall artists, and their Singer Junior Sportsman's Coupe. This little 8 HP two-seater Coupe sold at £165 and was mechanically similar to the Junior Saloon except that the engine developed 19·6 bhp at 4000 rpm as compared with 16 at 3600.
1930 Singer Porlock
UK

Singer Porlock

  Also see: Singer Road Tests and Reviews
 
Singer Porlock Two-Seater on original run of 100 consecutive climbs of Porlock Hill, North Devon, which gave the model its name.
1930 Singer Super Six
UK

Singer Super Six

  Also see: Singer Road Tests and Reviews
 
Singer Super Six Coupe was one of the company's top-line models and cost £350. The Saloon on the same 9 ft 6 ½ in wheelbase chassis was sold at the same price. Engine was a 1920-cc (65'5 x 95 mm) 45-bhp OHV Six, rated at 15·91 HP. Singer also produced a smaller, 37 -bhp 1792-cc side-valve Six, rated at 15· 7 HP.
1930 Standard 9HP
UK

Standard 9 HP

  Also see: Standard Road Tests and Reviews
 
Standard 9 HP chassis was available with several body types including the Teignmouth Fabric Saloon with sliding roof shown left. The basic saloon was known as Fulham (wb 8 ft 3 in and 7 ft 8 in resp.). Both had 4-cyl. 1287cc side-valve engine. Standard also offered 6-cyl. 2054-cc 15 HP models.
1930 Sunbeam 25HP
UK

Sunbeam 25 HP

  Also see: Sunbeam Road Tests and Reviews
 
Sunbeam 25 HP was one of four types offered by this famous manufacturer. The six-cylinder OHV engine measured 80 x 120 mm (3619 cc) and developed 70 bhp. Treasury rating was 23·8 HP. The wheelbase was just over 11 ft 5 in, the tyre size 6.00-21. The Rally Weymann Saloon with side-mounted spare wheels cost £1075 and was supplied only to special order.
1930 Triumph 7 HP
UK

Triumph 7 HP

  Also see: Triumph Road Tests and Reviews
 
Triumph offered a wide range of body styles on the 7 HP Model K chassis. Shown is a 1930/31 Open Two-seater which sold at £167.1 Os It had an 832·24-cc (56·5 x 83 mm) 7·9 HP side-valve Four engine, developing 18 bhp. A Supercharged Sports Two-seater was offered also, priced at £250. Triumphs were among the earliest British cars to have hydraulic brakes.
1930 Triumph 7 HP
UK

Trojan Tourer

 
 
Trojan was available in Saloon and Tourer (shown) form and had many unconventional features including a valveless two-stroke four-cylinder engine located beneath the front seats, open epicyclic two-speed gearbox, chain drive to a solid rear axle (no differential), and long cantilever leaf springs, to list a few. It was produced with only minor changes from the early 1920s until 1930/31. After that it was continued only with van bodywork, notably for Brooke Bonds, until the Second World War. In 1930 Trojan Ltd. introduced a rear-engined car which was in small-scale production until 1936.
1930 Vauxhall Cadet
UK

Vauxhall Cadet

  Also see: Vauxhall Road Tests and Reviews
 
Vauxhall introduced their new Cadet with 2048-cc (67·5 x 95 mm) engine, rated at 16·9 HP. It supplemented the 2916-cc T and TL models. All had OHV Six engines. The Cadet had 8 ft 11 in wheelbase and 5.00-29 tyres on wire wheels.
1930 Wolseley Hornet
UK

Wolseley Hornet

  Also see: Wolseley Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Wolseley Hornet was one of the first cheap British small six-cylinder engined cars. In a way it resembled the Morris Minor, with two extra 57 x 83 mm cylinders and bonnet to suit. Cubic capacity was 1271cc, RAC rating 12.08 HP. Example shown has Hoyal Coupe coachwork.
1930 Hillman Fourteen and Straight 8Hillman Fourteen and Straight 8 on display at the London Motor Show, 1930.
Hillman produced two types of cars. the 12·8 HP Fourteen and the 19·7 HP Straight 8.
1930 Bugatti Coupe_De Ville
1930 Bugatti Coupe_De Ville.
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