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British and European Car Spotters Guide - 1950

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1950 British and European Car Spotters Guide

The Earls Court Motor Show



The British public flocked to the 1949 Earls Court Motor Show to look at the 1950 models which they had little chance of owning for many, many months - if at all, even if they could afford to buy. There was little respite either for those motorists who turned to the second-hand car market because the prices of year-old used cars were, generally speaking, well above list price - a phenomenom that would be repeated rarely in following years, namely some iterations of the Porsche 911. The monthly production average during 1950 was 43,543 of which 25,749 (complete) and 4,968 (chassis only) were for export. Total car production for the year was 522,515 and 397,688 of these were exported. New UK registrations totalled 134,394 cars and 11,486 hackneys. Only 1375 cars were imported, valued at £359,005.

The value of cars exported was more than £116 million. Design trends were favouring full-width bodies, enclosed rear wheels and smaller wheels with a larger tyre section. In an effort to create more room inside, many car designers were opting for three-seater front bench seats which meant that the position of the gear lever had to be moved from the floor to the steering column. Notable newcomers introduced during the year included the Aston Martin DB2, Jowett Jupiter, MG Midget TO, Rover 75 and Triumph Mayflower. Post war redevelopment led to the acquisition by the Rootes Group of even more companies; Tilling-Stevens in 1950 (who had themselves acquired Vulcan in the late thirties), and Beadle Coachworks of Dartford in 1953.

Humber continued production of the big sixes; except for a Hillman-based 2-litre four-cylinder in the Humber Hawk. In 1950, a Super Snipe driven by Maurice Gatsonides and the Baron van Zuylen de Nyvelt took second place in the Monte Carlo Rally, even though "Gatso" had - amusingly - chosen the least sporting car he could think of. In 1952, a Snipe was driven from London to Cape Town in a record 13 days and 9 hours.

Car Design



After the war, the American attitude towards the motor car shifted significantly. Cars were no longer tools, but were becoming luxury toys, and the bigger and more luxurious, the more sought after they were. Manufacturers began to trade on this new concept and adopted a policy of frequent styling changes, so that the poor owner found himself unfashionable with monotonous regularity.

In order to implement these body-styling changes easily and inexpensively, American manufacturers retained the separate body and chassis arrangement for the majority of their models. The European approach was different. Their idea was to keep a car in production over a longer period of time with only minimal modification, and in Europe the majority of manufacturers opted for the integral body and chassis construction. The bloated look of the 1940s, typified in the Ford Pilot and the Standard Vanguard, quickly gave way to more subtle designs. Curves became more flowing, flatter and harmonised better. The pendulum of this change swung to an extreme with the introduction of the Triumph Renown in 1950 and the Mayflower in 1951, both of which featured razor-edge bodywork.

Opinions differ markedly over these two cars. Some people consider the Mayflower to be a pretty little car, fittingly styled, and the Renown to be a large ungainly car. Others say that the design was inappropriate for a car as small as the Mayflower, but the designer had achieved particular success with this stylistic approach on the Renown. The razor-edge style was dropped by Triumph when these two models were discontinued, so it seems likely that they, too, were not particularly happy about it.

Abarth Vignale
Italy

Abarth Vignale

 
  Engine: Cisitalia Inline-4, twin DR4SP Weber Carburettors, 2 Valves per Cylinder
Displacement: 1089 cc / 66.5 cu in
Bore: 71.5 mm / 2.81 in
Stroke: 75 mm / 2.95 in
Compression: 10.5:1
Power: 55.9 kw / 75 bhp @ 6000 rpm (hp per litre: 68.87)
Body: aluminium Body over Pressed Steel Frame
Brakes: Front & Rear Drums
Front wheels: F 4.5 x 15 cm / 1.8 x 5.9 in
Rear wheels: R 5.0 x 15 cm / 2.0 x 5.9 in
Steering: Worm & Sector
Front suspension: Porsche-Style Torsion Bars w/Trailing Links, Hydraulic Dampers
Rear suspension: Rigid Axle w/Semi-Elliptic Springs, Hydraulic Dampers
Weight: 818 kg / 1803 lbs
Wheelbase: 2210 mm / 87.0 in
Rear track: 1258 mm / 1248 in
Length: 3495 mm / 137.6 in
Width: 1420 mm / 55.9 in
Height: 1245 mm / 49.0 in
Transmission: 4-Speed Manual
Final drive: 3.7:1
Top speed: 170.0 kph / 105.6 mph
1950 AC 2-Litre Buckiand Sports Tourer
UK

AC 2-Litre Buckiand Sports Tourer

  Also see: AC Road Tests and Reviews
 
AC 2-Litre Buckiand Sports Tourer. This model had all-new open coachwork by Buckland Body Works of Buntingford, Herts, and was distinguishable from the earlier 2-Litre Drophead Coupe mainly by the full-length front wings and the one-piece, fold-flat windscreen. It was made until 1954.
1950 <a href=
UK

Allard J2 Sports Roadster

  Also see: Allard Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Allard J2 Sports Roadster was powered by a 6-litre engine and a 440ci Chrysler VS respectively (to customer's requirements)-more usual were modified Ford V8 power units. The J2 was superseded by the modified J2X in the autumn of 1951. A two-door Saloon (Model P1) was also available.
1950 <a href=
UK

Allard J2X Sports Roadster

  Also see: Allard Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Allard J2 Sports Roadster was powered by a 6-litre engine and a 440ci Chrysler VS respectively (to customer's requirements)-more usual were modified Ford V8 power units. The J2 was superseded by the modified J2X in the autumn of 1951. A two-door Saloon (Model P1) was also available.
1950 Alvis Three Litre Model TA 21 Saloon
UK

Alvis Three Litre Model TA 21 Saloon

  Also see: Alvis Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Alvis Three Litre, Model TA 21 Saloon had a similar body to the Fourteen (discontinued in October 1950), but was larger and followed more the classical line, with sweepingly curved wings, faired-in headlamps and traditional grille.
1950 Armstrong Siddeley Typhoon / Lancaster Saloon and Hurricane Drophead Coupe
UK

Armstrong Siddeley Typhoon / Lancaster Saloon and Hurricane Drophead Coupe

   
 
Powered by a 2·3-litre 18 HP engine which developed 75 bhp at 4200 rpm, with a choice of either preselector or synchromesh gearboxes. All three models were introduced in September 1949 to replace the previous 16 HP 1·9-litre-engined versions. The Typhoon was discontinued in May 1950.
1950 Armstrong Siddeley Whitley Saloon
UK

Armstrong Siddeley Whitley Saloon

   
 
The Armstrong Siddeley Whitley Saloon was introduced in September 1949. Dimensionally similar to the Lancaster, but with semi razor-edged body styling and greater rear seat headroom, it used the same mechanical components as the Lancaster, Hurricane and Typhoon. Wheelbase of all models was 9 ft 7 in.
1950 Aston Martin DB2 Saloon
UK

Aston Martin DB2 Saloon

  Also see: Aston Martin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Aston Martin DB2 Saloon was first officially shown to the public at the New York Motor Show in April 1950, although a prototype version was entered-successfully-in competitions the previous year. The 2·6-litre twin-OHC engine, which produced 105 bhp at 5000 rpm. was fitted in an all-new light-alloy body; the bonnet and wing structure was hinged at the front so that with the bonnet raised the entire front end of the chassis could be exposed.
1950 Austin A40 GS2 Devon Saloon
UK

Austin A40 GS2 Devon Saloon

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
Austin A40 Models GS2 Devon Saloon and GP2 Countryman were carryovers from 1949 with detail modifications. The Devon was also available with bench-type front seat; this version was designated Devon Mark II, Model GS2A.
1950 Austin A70 Models BS2 Hampshire Saloon and BW3 Countryman
UK

Austin A70 Models BS2 Hampshire Saloon and BW3 Countryman

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Austin A70 Models BS2 Hampshire Saloon and BW3 Countryman for 1950 had triangular vent panels in the front windows, like the 1950 A40 models.
1950 Austin A90 Atlantic Sports saloon Model BE2
UK

Austin A90 Atlantic Sports saloon Model BE2

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Austin A90 Atlantic Sports saloon, Model BE2, was introduced in September 1949. Powered by a 2·6-litre 88-bhp engine it was mechanically similar to the A90 Atlantic Convertible but with a higher axle ratio.
1950 Austin A90 Atlantic
UK

Austin A90 Atlantic

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Austin Atlantics very distinctive body styling featured front wings that swept through to the rear of the body, a wrap-round rear window and a cyclops type built-in spotlamp.
1950 Austin A125 Sheerline Model OS1
UK

Austin A125 Sheerline Model OS1

  Also see: Austin Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Austin A125 Sheerline Model OS1 luxury saloon had a six-cylinder 3·9-litre engine. The Model OM1 Limousine was similar but had a lengthened chassis, different seating and other detail differences.
1950 Bristol 401 Saloon
UK

Bristol 401 Saloon

  Also see: Bristol Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Bristol 401 Saloon had a 2-litre 85-bhp Six engine and a top speed of 100 mph. The body was built by Bristol under Superleggera Touring patents and included concealed locks for fuel filler and luggage compartment. The bumpers had synthetic rubber inserts.
1950 Citroen Light Fifteen
France

Citroen Light Fifteen

  Also see: Citroen Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Citroen Light Fifteen was a British-built edition of the French Citroen 11 Sport. It featured a walnut fascia board and other distinguishing differences to make it more suitable for British consumption, including wheels, bumpers, chrome-plated radiator grille, etc. Production ran from 1945 until 1955.
1950 Daimler Straight Eight DE36
UK

Daimler Straight Eight DE36

  Also see: Daimler Road Tests and Reviews
 
A Daimler Straight Eight DE36 chassis with Sports Saloon bodywork by Freestone and Webb. Other luxury cars were built on this chassis by well-known firms such as Hooper, Windover, etc.
1950 Daimler DB 18 Consort Saloon
UK

Daimler DB 18 Consort Saloon

  Also see: Daimler Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Daimler DB 18 Consort saloon differed from the earlier version (2½-litre DB18) by having a curved radiator grille, faired-in headlamps and sidelamps, and curved V-section bumpers. Mechanical improvements included a hypoid bevel final drive and hydro-mechanical brakes.
1950 Dellow Mark I Sports
UK

Dellow Mark I Sports

   
 
The Dellow Mark I Sports started life as a one-off trials special-the creation of K. C. Delingpole and R. B. Lowe (hence Dellow). In October 1949 it was introduced as a small-series production car, featuring a Ford Ten E93A engine (a supercharger was optional) and gearbox with Ford rigid front and rear axles, steering and brakes. The body was aluminium.
1950 Fiat 1400
Italy

Fiat 1400

  Also see: Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
   
1950 Fiat 1400
Italy

Fiat 1400

  Also see: Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
   
1950 Fiat 1400 Cabriolet
Italy

Fiat 1400 Cabriolet

  Also see: Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
   
1950 Fiat 1500 E
Italy

Fiat 1500 E

  Also see: Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
   
1950 Fiat 1500 E
Italy

Fiat 1500 E

  Also see: Fiat Road Tests and Reviews
   
1950 Ford Pilot Model E71A Saloon
UK

Ford Pilot Model E71A Saloon

  Also see: Ford UK Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Ford Pilot Model E71A Saloon was a carryover from the previous year. It was powered by a 3·6-litre V8 engine. Production ceased in 1951. The two-door Anglia (E494A) was also continued unchanged.
1950 Ford Pilot V8 Estate
UK

Ford Pilot V8 Estate

  Also see: Ford UK Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Ford Pilot V8 Estate with all-metal panelled body by Hawes & Son Ltd was introduced in 1950 and produced only in small numbers. The spare wheel was mounted on the tailgate.
1950 Ford Prefect Model E493A
UK

Ford Prefect Model E493A

  Also see: Ford UK Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Ford Prefect Model E493A was continued from 1949 with no changes. It had been given a restyled front end early in that year and had an 1172-cc 30-bhp L-head Four engine with three-speed gearbox.
1950 Frazer-Nash Cabriolet
UK

Frazer-Nash Cabriolet

   
 
The Frazer-Nash Cabriolet was introduced in September 1949. Powered by the Bristol 1971-cc engine-used in similar form on the competition Frazer-Nashes - this luxury tourer had a greater wheelbase and track than the competition models while retaining a very low overall height. It featured an ingenious windscreen, which folded down onto the scuttle, and two-folding emergency seats inside. A Mille Miglia two-seater version was also introduced.
1950 Healey Silverstone
UK

Healey Silverstone

   
 
The Healey Silverstone was introduced in July 1949. The open two-seater had a lightweight stressed-skin alloy sports body mounted on a D-type chassis (E-type chassis from April 1950) and was powered by a 2·5-litre Riley engine. The windscreen was retracted into the scuttle when in the racing position, instead of being folded flat; the spare wheel 'doubled' as a rear bumper and the wings were removable for competition work. Only 105 were built. We do not know if any survive to this day.
1950 Hillman Minx Mark IV Saloon, Convertible Coupe and Estate
UK

Hillman Minx Mark IV Saloon, Convertible Coupe and Estate

  Also see: Hillman Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Hillman Minx Mark IV Saloon, Convertible Coupe and Estate Car were introduced in December 1949. Although retaining the styling of the Mark III versions they featured more powerful engines (1265 cc v. 1184·5 cc) and could be quickly identified by the separate sidelamps. The left-hand drive car shown was owned by an American reporter who is photographed alongside it with a friend, in London, prior to setting off on a tour of Europe.
1950 Humber Super Snipe Mark II Saloon
UK

Humber Super Snipe Mark II Saloon

  Also see: Humber Road Tests and Reviews
 
Humber Super Snipe Mark II Saloon. Fitted with the 4086cc 100-bhp engine (also used with the Mark I Super Snipes) and a four-speed gearbox. This six-seater model (first introduced in October 1948) incorporated detail changes for 1950 (announced in August 1949) including separate sidelamps below the headlamps. A Humber Imperial Mark II Saloon was launched late in 1949 and was virtually identical to the Pullman Limousine of that time but without the central partition.
1950 Fiat 1500 E
East Germany

IFA F9

   
   
1950 Jaguar Mark V Drophead Coupe
UK

Jaguar Mark V Drophead Coupe

  Also see: Jaguar Car Reviews and Jaguar - A Racing Pedigree
 
The Jaguar Mark V Drophead Coupe and its Saloon counterpart were available with a choice of 2½ or 3½ litre engines. The Mark V models were discontinued in 1951.
1950 Jowett Javelin Jupiter Mark I Series SA
UK

Jowett Javelin Jupiter Mark I Series SA

   
 
The Jowett Javelin Jupiter Mark I, Series SA, was introduced in March 1950. It originated as ERA/Javelin chassis in September 1949. Powered by a Flat-4 1486-cc engine which gave over 60 bhp, this open sports model featured an aluminium panelled body with sweepingly curved wings and a rear luggage boot which could only be reached from inside the car. The whole front of the bodywork was hinged at the scuttle.
1950 Lanchester Ten Series L010 Saloon
UK

Lanchester Ten Series L010 Saloon

   
 
Lanchester Ten, Series L010 Saloon. In September 1949 the popular 10 HP chassis was fitted with a new four-light Barker coachbuilt body (aluminium panels on a wood and steel framework) which, although similar in appearance to the previous Briggs (steel) bodied version at the front, had a more attractive line and featured curved windows and a spacious luggage compartment.
1950 Lea-Francis 2½-Litre Sports
UK

Lea-Francis 2½-Litre Sports

   
 
The Lea-Francis 2½-Litre Sports was introduced in September 1949 with similar general lines to the Fourteen Sports which it replaced. It was powered by a twin-carburettor 100-bhp engine and featured doors with wind-up windows and a windscreen with triangular side panels which could be removed as one assembly. It was continued in production until October 1954, when the company folded. Tradgedy.
1950 MG Midget TD
UK

MG Midget TD

  Also see: MG Road Tests and Reviews
 
The MG Midget TD replaced the TC in January 1950. Although powered by the same engine it featured numerous detail improvements, including independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, and revised gear ratios to suit its greater overall weight. The general outline of the body at the front end was modified on the lines of the Y Series open-tourer (1948-51). Its reception by MG enthusiasts of the day was decidedly cool, mainly because of its 'heavier' look, the pierced disc wheels and, above all, the inclusion of bumpers...
1950 Renault 4CV, Model R1060
France

Renault 4CV, Model R1060

  Also see: Renault Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Renault 4CV, Model R1060, was introduced in Britain in November 1949 and assembled at the Renault Ltd plant at Acton, near London; it had originally been introduced in France in 1947, and featured a rear-mounted engine. The cubic capacity of 760 cc meant that it was just over the international 750-cc class for competition events. This was rectified in 1950 when the cylinder bore size was reduced to give it a capacity of 748 cc (R1062).
1950 Riley 2·1-Litre Model RMC Roadster
UK

Riley 2·1-Litre Model RMC Roadster

  Also see: Riley Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Riley 2·1-Litre Model RMC Roadster was produced during 1948-1950, but was only available in the domestic British market from September 1949. Originally a three-seater, it became a two-seater early in 1950.
1950 RolIs-Royce Silver Wraith Sports Saloon
UK

RolIs-Royce Silver Wraith Sports Saloon

  Also see: Rolls Royce Road Tests and Reviews
 
RolIs-Royce Silver Wraith Sports saloon, with coachwork by Park Ward & Co, Ltd. One of these models-owned by Mr W M. Couper-took part in the 1950 Monte Carlo Rally where it won the Grand Prix d'Honneur du Concours de Contort.
1950 Rover 75 Series P4 Saloon
UK

Rover 75 Series P4 Saloon

  Also see: Rover Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Rover 75 Series P4 Saloon was introduced in September 1949, replacing the Series P3. It had completely restyled bodywork, mounted on a new full-length chassis with improved (six-cylinder twin-carb) engine, transmission and suspension. The traditional Rover appearance gave way to full-width styling with an extended boot to balance the front end. A cyclops type foglamp was mounted in the radiator grille.
1950 Saab 92
Sweden

Saab 92

  Also see: Saab Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Saab 92 was the Scandinavian Beetle, the car that put the common Swede on the road. It was a hugely advanced piece of work, though, and very aerodynamic (Saabs 90 and 91 were actually aircraft).
1950 Standard Vanguard 20S Saloon and Estate
UK

Standard Vanguard 20S Saloon and Estate

  Also see: Standard Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Standard Vanguard 20S Saloon and Estate Car for 1950 were modified in various respects, including separate side lights, enclosed rear wheels and relocation of the gearshift lever to the left of the steering column.
Trabant
East Germany

Trabant

  Also see: AWZ Trabant Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Trabant put communist-era Eastern Bloc residents on wheels, as big a revolution behind the Iron Curtain as the VW Beetle was for their western cousins. Several versions were made, but the famous P600 (plastic body, 600cc two-stroke) 'Trabbie' was made for 30 years unchanged.
1950 Triumph Mayflower Saloon
UK

Triumph Mayflower Saloon

  Also see: Triumph Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Triumph Mayflower Saloon of 1950 featured 'razor-edge' styling.
1950 Triumph Mayflower Drop Head Coupe
UK

Triumph Mayflower Drop Head Coupe

  Also see: Triumph Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Triumph Mayflower Saloon, Series 1200T, was introduced in September 1949. This two-door, razor-edged, small car had 38-bhp 1247-cc side-valve engine mounted in an integral body/chassis structure with coil-spring independent front suspension. Although the bodywork was basically a scaled-down version of the Renown, it was surprisingly roomy inside and had the same internal width (53 inches). In October 1950 a limited-production Drophead Coupe version was announced.
1950 Triumph Renown
UK

Triumph Renown Series 20ST Saloon

  Also see: Triumph Road Tests and Reviews
 
Triumph Renown Series 20ST Saloon. Renamed version of an earlier model. namely the 2000 Saloon (Series 20T) which, in turn, had been introduced in February 1949 to supersede the 1800 Saloon (Series 18T). Powered by the 2088-cc Standard Vanguard engine, this razor-edged saloon had a box-section type chassis which replaced the tubular type used on the 1800-with independent front suspension and Lockheed hydraulic brakes.
1950 Triumph TRX Roadster
UK

Triumph TRX Roadster Prototype

  Also see: Triumph Road Tests and Reviews
 
Triumph Roadster (prototype) This ambitious and very advanced model, revealed by Triumph in 1950, was a Vanguard-engined sports car fitted with striking, aerodynamic bodywork and featuring fully retractable electrically-operated headlamp covers, curved windscreen, hydraulically-operated top, windows and seats, large boot with wind-down tray for the spare wheel and a transmission with three speeds and overdrive fourth gear as standard.
1950 Triumph TRX Roadster
UK

Triumph TRX Roadster Prototype

  Also see: Lost Marques - Triumph
 
Unfortunately Triumph decided the Roadster was too complicated and expensive to produce and could not, therefore, be sold at a competitive price. Only two prototypes were built. One of the great tragedies of 20th Century motoring.
1950 Volkswagen Volkswagen Beetle Export
Germany

Volkswagen Beetle Export

  Also see: Volkswagen Beetle Production Numbers
 
In 1935 an Austrian engineer, who had been working for the company for less than a year, came up with a design for a flat four engine within two days of working on the project. After the accountants had checked it, it proved to be the most financially viable option. That very same engine design would go on to power the Beetle for the next 40 years. Ferdinand Porsche had been working on various other cars for other manufacturers before the Volkswagen, and incorporated some older designs within this new project.

Other vehicle designs were utilized for this project, the backbone chassis and the idea of independent front and rear suspension came from the torsion bar front suspension patented by Porsche back in 1931. The body styling dated back to 1931, to a car called the "Wandere", which never reached production and the only prototype built was used by Ferdinand Porsche for his personal transport. Hitler also had plans for the styling of the Volkswagen, he is reputed to have said "It should look like a Beetle, you have to look to nature to find out what streamlining is." Hence the name Beetle. Over the years larger engines were fitted to Beetles and minor interior and exterior changes were made, although none too dramatic.
Volkswagen Microbus
Germany

Volkswagen Microbus

  Also see: Volkswagen Road Tests and Reviews
 
The vehicle that represents freedom and the open road for millions; instantly recognisable, the Kombi, camper van or Magic Bus remains desirable for families, single surfers and backpackers alike. The first generation of the VW Type 2 with the split front window, called the Microbus or Kombie among Australian fans, was produced from March 8th, 1950 through the end of the 1967 model year. Like the Beetle, the Transporters used the Volkswagen air-cooled four-cylinder boxer engine mounted in the rear.

In 1962, a heavy-duty Transporter was introduced as a factory option. It was so successful that only a year later, the 750 kg, 1.2 L Transporter was discontinued. Among enthusiasts, it is common to refer to the different models by the number of their windows. The basic Kombi or Bus is the 11-window (a.k.a. 3-window bus because of three side windows) with the deluxe model or 13-window having eight rear side windows a split windshield, two front cabin door windows and one rear window. The Samba-Bus or Deluxe Microbus also featured unique a fold back cloth sunroof.
1950 Vauxhall Wyvern Series L1X
UK

Vauxhall Wyvern Series L1X

  Also see: Vauxhall Road Tests and Reviews
 
The Vauxhall Wyvern, Series L1X, was a smaller engined (1442-cc 4-cyl.) stable mate of the Velox saloon (Series LIP) Externally it was similar to the Velox except that the wheels were painted in the body colour (v. cream), no bumper overriders were fitted and the tyre size was 5·00-16 (v. 5·90-16). Compared with 1949, 1950 editions had larger headlamps with separate sidelamps, plus various mechanical modifications.
1950 Wolseley Six-Eighty
UK

Wolseley Six-Eighty

  Also see: Wolseley Road Tests and Reviews
 

The Wolseley Six-Eighty was a larger companion model to the similarly-styled four-cylinder engined Four-Fifty saloon and powered by a six-cylinder 2215-cc, 72-bhp twin-carburettor engine. It also had a 9 ft 2 in (v. 8 ft 6 in) wheelbase and a greater overall length. The separate sidelights were fitted from September. The Six- Eighty was continued until October 1954 when it was replaced by the Six-Ninety.

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