Unique Cars and Parts Member Image Gallery

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Unique Cars and Parts Member Image Gallery
30/98
1913 - 1927
At the outbreak of war, the Prince Henry had already evolved into the classic 4½ litre 30/98 model, and this was revived in 1919. As the side-valve model, the E-Type, it was built up until 1922, featuring such Edwardian niceties as exposed valve springs, and a fixed cylinder head.
Cresta
1957 - 1962
Inspired by GM Detriot, the Vauxhall Cresta integrated rear wings and other design queues from its American parent. The car featured an all syncro 3 speed gearbox and smooth pushrod six, which gave the car a top speed of 145 km/h.
Victor F-Series
1957 - 1961
The Vauxhall Victor was a worthy successor to the Wyvern, offering accommodation for four in comfort, and five if required. The outstanding characteristic of the Victor was its nimbleness and good handling qualities. The road performance was only moderate, more particularly on hill climbing and acceleration. However, it offered very good fuel mileage. As a general purpose car, it was for the time a good example of modern British engineering.
Victor FB and VX4/90
1961- 1964
The cleaner styled FB ran from 1961 until 1964. It was widely exported, though sales in the US ended after 1961 when Pontiac, Oldsmobile and Buick came up with home-grown compact models of their own. Consequently, the FB only achieved sales of 328,000 vehicles by the time it was replaced in 1964.
Velox PB
1962- 1965
At the time, the Vauxhall Velox and Cresta were the biggest cars made by the British branch of the General Motors' empire. Back in 1957, these six-cylinder Vauxhalls caused plenty of interest - in Australia, as in Britain, because of their highly individual appearance. In the intervening years the cars retained their appearance, being long, low and square at the both ends.
Viva HA
1963 - 1966
Introduced in 1963, the HA Viva represented the first small car to be released by Vauxhall since the war. The Viva was a car much needed by Vauxhall, it having lost ground to many competitors.
Viva HB
1966 - 1970
Look familiar? It should, as it was the Vauxhall Viva HB that became the General's first "small" Aussie car, the Torana HB. Originally introduced in the UK in August 1966, it would take until March 1967 for the car to be "Australianised" and ready for local consumption.
Victor FD
1967 - 1972
In 1967 Vauxhall celebrated its Diamond Jubilee Year with the introduction of the new FD Victor. The range received much public acclaim for its styling, engines and safety features such as the energy-absorbing steering wheel.
Viva HB 4 Door
1968 - 1970
TWO more doors were added to Vauxhall's various Vivas (excluding station wagon (estate) cars and GTs) in October 1968. The extra two doors added roughly £48 to the 2-door Viva prices, which were themselves increased in all cases by £8 to pay for the General Motors collapsing steering column which was fitted as standard.
Viva 2000 GT
1968 - 1970
Take one part SL90, one part Victor 2000 and add a dash of Cresta. The Viva GT was a strange concoction of various parts sourced from the then current Vauxhall lineup. Obviously the body and interior came courtesy of the HB Viva, while the Victor 2000 was used to source the 1975cc single ohc engine, along with the final drive and brakes.
Ventora
1968 - 1976
A long established tradition with virtually all car makers is the desire to have each new model offer better performance than the one it replaced. There are of course two ways to achieve this, modify and tune the existing engine to that it offers better performance and fuel economy, or simply plonk a larger engine in it.
Viva HC
1970 - 1979
The last of the Viva's, the HC, was released in October 1970, and went on to enjoy a long 9 year production run. Again both wider and longer than its predecessor, the HC featured a masculine look, with straight lines and edges and flat-faced front end.
Firenza Droop Snoot
1973 - 1975
In the late 1960's the concensus was very much that the sheet metal rolling of the production line at Vauxhall's Luton manufacturing plant was pretty ordinary, and performance enthusiasts usually shopped elsewhere.
Chevette
1975 - 1984
The Chevette was designed to fit into the Vauxhall range below the Viva, and was initially presented as a hatchback, a style that soared in popularity during the 1970s. The Chevette was the first British-built hatchback of this size, with Ford not responding with a similar product until the following year.
Blydenstein Chevette 1500
1975 - 1976
We have no idea who made the decision to create a "hot" Chevette - it may well have been Bill Blydenstein himself. The choice of car may seem strange, but the Chevette did offer excellent steering and roadholding, and road testers of the standard iteration had often declared that the chassis deserved more power.
Cavalier Mark 1
1975 - 1981
The Cavalier 1300L was the cheapest and lowest-powered of the range. Above it, also with a choice of two or four doors and with the same standard of trim, came the 1600L. Above this was the 1600GL, available only in four-door form and with substantial extra trim (though little of it might be regarded as fundamental). Then came the 1900G L, again only available with four doors. Rounding off the Cavalier range is the 1900GLS Coupe, the only Vauxhall equivalent of the Opel Manta.
Chevette 2300HS
1975 - 1981
One of the notable things about the ordinary everyday Vauxhall Chevettes was their outstanding handling and roadholding, which, despite the low powered 1256cc engine the cars were equipped with, made them reasonably fun to drive. When Vauxhall homologated a version of the Chevette for rally competition the larger engined car was awaited with great eagerness.
Carlton Mark 2
1975 - 1981
The Cavalier 1300L was the cheapest and lowest-powered of the range. Above it, also with a choice of two or four doors and with the same standard of trim, came the 1600L. Above this was the 1600GL, available only in four-door form and with substantial extra trim (though little of it might be regarded as fundamental). Then came the 1900G L, again only available with four doors. Rounding off the Cavalier range is the 1900GLS Coupe, the only Vauxhall equivalent of the Opel Manta.

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