AMC American Motors Reviews and Road Tests

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AMC American Motors Car Reviews


AMC was formed from the merger of Nash and Hudson, using the Nash Rambler as its platform to regain market share. The marque would follow up with some suprisingly good models, such as the 1959 V8 Ambassador and sporty Javelin. AMC purchased Kaiser-Jeep in 1970, the Jeep becoming AMC's best seller for many years. Unfortunately they were never a real match for the Big 3, and so attempted to make a play for the compact car market with the Pacer, an oversized small car. AMC were taken over by Chrysler in 1988, the latter only interested in the Jeep.

Also see: The Rambler Story (USA Edition)
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AMC Rambler Classic  

AMC Rambler Classic

1961- 1966
The Rambler was the focus of AMC's management strategy under the leadership of George W. Romney. American Motors designed and built some of the most fuel-efficient, best-styled and well-made cars of the 1950s and 1960s. Their compact cars (for the era) helped AMC to achieve sales and corporate profit successes. More>>
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AMC Rambler 770  

AMC Rambler 770

1963 - 1966
The Rambler 770 may have been, by the American definition, a "Compact", but the standards of just about any other country, it remained very much a large car. Like the large American cars then available, the 770 was both conventional and familiar, the mechanical specification including a long-stroke six-cylinder engine, live rear axle with coil springs, torque tube and a Panhard rod, and large diameter drum brakes all round. More>>
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AMC Rambler 770  

AMC Marlin

1965 - 1966
Unlike any other U.S. auto manufacturer from the 1960s, American Motors chose to base their entire line around compactness and economy. And this paid off handsomely. By getting a head start on the compact craze, they were able to step right up and supply the demand with proven compacts while competitors were in the throes of de-bugging and introducing theirs. More>>
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AMC Rebel  

AMC Rebel

1967 - 1970
The AMC Rebel (known as the Rambler Rebel in 1967) was a mid-sizer built between 1967 and 1970. The Rebel was based on AMC's "senior" automobile platform shared with the full-size Ambassador line. For the U.S. and Canadian markets, the Rebel was built at AMC's "West Assembly Line" (along with the Ambassador) in Kenosha, Wisconsin and at Brampton, Ontario, Canada (Bramalea - Brampton Assembly Plant). More>>
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AMC AMX  

AMC AMX

1968 - 1970
IHere in Australia the AMX was imported by AMI - it being a short, aggressive two-seater based on the identically priced Javelin but measuring a full 12 inches shorter in both wheelbase and overall length. It effectively condensed the red-blooded American image of the Javelin into a compact, rorty car with which the driver could achieve a feeling of one-ness that was usually only confined to European cars. Yet it did this without losing its U.S.-bred image. More>>
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AMC Javelin  

AMC Javelin

1968 - 1974
In 1968 AMC needed to create a 'cult' car, something to give the company prestige and win back customers that were deserting it for the ever growing popularity of the Ford Mustang. Also in AMC's sights was the Chevy Comaro and Plymouth Barracuda. More>>
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AMC Hornet  

AMC Hornet


1970 - 1977
Built on a 108-inch wheelbase, the new Hornet sedans had a long hood/short rear deck styling theme that was in line with the public tastes at the time. These basic elements had been used in 1969 for the new Ford Maverick compact car, which had proven to be immensely popular. More>>
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AMC Pacer

AMC Pacer

1975 - 1980
Information being compiled. More>>

 

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