23émes Grand Prix d`Endurance les 24 Heures du Mans 1955

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LeMans Grand Prix d`Endurance les 24 Heures du Mans 1955


Le Mans 1938
Le Mans
Le Mans 1962

Circuit Permanenthe de la Sarthe
Date: June 16th and 17th, 1955


Conditions: Warm, Rain on Sunday
Starters: 60
Track Length: 13,492 metres
Distance: 4135.380 km
Fastest Lap: Mike Hawthorn, Jaguar, 4:06.6 = 196.963 km/h on lap 28
Average Speed: 172.308 km/h
The 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans was the 23rd Grand Prix of Endurance, and took place on June 11 and 12, 1955. It was also the fourth round of the World Sportscar Championship. This race saw the tragic death of 84 spectators and the injuring of over 100 more when Pierre Levegh's Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR was involved in an accident and flew into the crowd, killing the driver as well. Shortly after the incident, the other two Mercedes vehicles in the race were withdrawn (in leading position).

This accident, the most catastrophic in motorsport's history, led to great changes in the measures taken to ensure the safety of drivers and spectators. Its fallout also led to many car manufacturers pulling out of motorsport (including Mercedes), and even the temporary outlawing of circuit racing in several countries. Switzerland banned simultaneous competition between cars (i.e. except for hillclimbs), a ban which remains in place to this day.

Mike Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb, who were piloting the Jag, went on to a rather hollow victory - while it would take until 1988 for Mercedes to return to competitive racing, when they would join forces with the Swiss Sauber team in the Sports Prototype Championship, then lining up on the grid with its partner AMG in the German Touring Car Championship (DTM).

The 1955 accident led to widespread safety measures being brought into place not only at the circuit, but elsewhere in the motorsports world. However, even though the safety standards improved, so did the speeds of the cars. The move from open-cockpit roadsters to closed-cockpit coupes would help produce speeds over 320 km/h on the Mulsanne.

The Le Mans Accident



At the time of the 1955 Le Mans crash, observers noted that the track seemed to be congested with cars. Eyewitness accounts say Hawthorn was well over to the right and already slowing some 250 yards before the beginning of the pit area. It was obvious that he was making a scheduled pit stop and equally obvious that he was in a hurry. A green car later identified as Macklin's was there too, but many noted the presence of a silver car coming up at enormous speed. Most assumed it to be Fangio, but in fact it was Levegh. The Mercedes did not seem to be using all the space available on the left of the road, possibly because Levegh did not know that he had a slight bend to deal with in 200 yards.

When the Austin-Healey pulled out to pass the Jaguar the three cars were not so much abreast as in echelon - Jaguar, Austin-Healey and Mercedes-Benz. Despite the footage showing the accident in some detail, it does not show the very first part of the accident. Historians believe that it was the Levegh Mercedes that touched the Austin-Healey, the right front-wheel of the Merc coming into contact with the Austin- Healey's left rear. During the ensuing 1/5 second (at an approximate velocity of 200 feet per second) the Mercedes, instead of steering to follow the changing line of the road, glanced slightly to the left and headed for the safety bank.

The Levegh Mercedes should have embedded itself in the safety wall, but instead the left front wheel rode up it and the car leapt tragically into the crowd, while still on the track, the Austin-Healey was spinning wildly. Now amoung the crowd, the Mercedes engine and parts of the chassis were catapulted through the unsuspecting spectators. There followed a moment of almost complete silence and shock. Observers who had escaped the carnage had difficulty measuring the extent of tradgedy they had just witnessed. From the wreck a few red flames sprouted. The instant of stillness was broken as the first gendarmes leapt across the road to the rescue. The Mercedes exploded with a thump into white flame.

Those who had been standing on chairs were now prone. The small enclosure was a jumble of broken chairs and unmoving bodies. Here there were no wounded. All were dead, many decapitated. Those who were still living had recoiled from the dead in a movement of instinctive and superstitious dread. There followed scenes which were an inevitable part of human experience. The Le Mans race, which had been a source of much pleasure and glamour, and suddenly become the cause of tragedy beyond imagination.

How Did It Happen, and Who Was To Blame?



Mercedes-Benz issued a long statement very soon after the event. Jaguar followed it with another briefer one. Both firms intended to show that their drivers were not to blame. Macklin, as a private; owner, had no one to speak for him. When given the opportunity to speak, Macklin, much to his credit, declined as he felt whatever he said might pass the blame onto someone else. He pointed out that the inquiring body would duly issue its findings as it thought fit.

There was plenty of conjecture as to the why, how and who. The drivers themselves all had ability in spades. All the cars were of approximately the same engine size. A study of the road where the accident occurred showed that, at the precise spot where the Mercedes hit the bank, the road kinked to the right. For the fastest cars this was a definite bend, and every car driver knew that it was not possible to hug the outside edge of a fast corner. If a car was travelling slowly in order to stop at its pit it had the same effect, as it passed the kink in the road, as a car parked on the bend. So that although the measurable width of the road was constant the effective width would be drastically reduced.

Travelling for various reasons at various speeds three cars reached this point simultaneously. Hawthorn, slowing for his pit, occupied the inside station on the corner. Macklin steered out to pass him. Levegh, moving very fast, was already committed to a certain line as he aimed his car for the corner. In attempting to squeeze past Macklin, he touched wheels with him. While the Austin-Healey spun wildly, the Mercedes was deflected towards the bank and within a split second was airborne.

How it rode up the bank and travelled through the air in one piece is a mystery. Not much earth was displaced and observers claimed that only the left front wheel collided substantially with the bank. The car rose, spinning, and only disintegrated when it landed again for the first time twenty to thirty yards farther on. Hundreds of witnesses gave their accounts of these three seconds. But the one vital testimony was that of Pierre Levegh.

Priests Move Among The Dying



While priests moved among the dying and the medical services the crowd swung into action. Meanwhile, a column of smoke rose from the direction of White House. Jacob's M.G. had turned over and caught fire. The driver was seriously injured. Other drivers, unaware of the disaster, slowed down to pass through the smoke that billowed across the road at two points and then drove on. Fangio had been following several hundred yards behind Levegh. He had seen the Frenchman's signal that he was about to pass another car and slackened speed. When the crash occurred he was able to slip past the spinning Austin-Healey, only dimly aware of the somersaulting car to his left.

Hawthorn, slowing at his pit, had seen it all. With one car ploughing through the spectators and another skidding madly all over the road, it was inevitable that he would over-shoot the pit lane. Mercedes, incorrectly, seized on this as a signal that Hawthorn was in fact travelling too fast to stop and said so afterwards in a statement to the press. There was great talk in the popular French and Italian press about Hawthorn's unpremeditated braking. Hawthorn, shocked by what he had seen, completed another lap and handed over to his co-driver, Ivor Bueb.

The Race Goes On



Fangio completed his lap and came to his pit. Smoke was pouring across the road and the scenes beyond the palings were heartbreaking. It was in these conditions that Stirling Moss was presented with the number one Mercedes. He jumped in and continued the drive. The race was going on.
Charles Faroux was faced with a decision that was not easy. It took more courage to let the race go on than to stop it. By his steadiness and inflexibility he averted the general stampede which would have made impossible the work of rescue, the summoning of friends and relatives, the effective employment of doctors and communications.

There were well over a quarter of a million people round that race track. Secondly, the continuation of the race was an affirmation that what had happened was an accident due to a combination of circumstances which would probably never repeat themselves. But it placed a terrible responsibility upon the drivers. More than ever before the race had become a test of endurance for drivers, organisers and spectators. For the thirty-sixth and thirty-seventh laps its times were 6 minutes 31 seconds and 6 minutes 37.6 seconds. The leading Mercedes continued at slightly slower speed until lap 41, when the time of 6 minutes 21.7 seconds indicates where Fangio handed over to Moss.

Perhaps the most remarkable lap in the whole race was Moss's fifty-third, accomplished in 4 minutes 8 seconds. Gallantly though Bueb tried, he could only record 4 minutes 51.5 seconds on the same lap. By eight o'clock the British car was almost two laps behind the German. Castellotti had vanished from the scene; his Ferrari was in the dead car park with a split cylinder block. After four hours of racing the first ten cars were well spaced out:
  1. Fangio / Moss (Mercedes), 55 laps.
  2. Hawthorn / Bueb (Jaguar), 54 laps.
  3. Maglioli / Hill (Ferrari), 54 laps.
  4. Rolt / Hamilton (Jaguar), 54-- laps.
  5. Beauman / Dewis (Jaguar), 53 laps.
  6. Musso / Valenzano (Maserati), 53 laps.
  7. Castellotti / Marzotto (Ferrari), 52 laps.
  8. Parnell / Poore (Lagonda), 52 laps.
  9. Claes / Swaters (Jaguar), 52 laps.
  10. Kling / Simon (Mercedes), 52 laps.
Car number 37, the 1.5- litre Porsche, which was destined to finish in fourth position among cars with twice its engine size, was at this point eighteenth with 48 laps to its credit. By 9.30 all the competing cars had switched their lights on. With the fall of darkness a terrible gloom settled on the scene. An announcement gave the death roll as fifty odd. When the voice was switched off there was silence, instead of the music so typical of Le Mans. The blaring exhaust notes of the cars as they went by echoed from the pits and the half-empty stands. The inquisitve had come to gaze at the enclosure where so many people had died. Gradually the fatal spot filled up again with spectators. By ten o'clock a whole age of racing seemed to have passed.
CLASS WINNERS
Index of Performance Rickard von Frankenberg / Helmut Polensky Porsche 550
21st Biennial cup Rickard von Frankenberg / Helmut Polensky Porsche 550
3001 - 5000cc Mike Hawthorn / Ivor Bueb Jaguar D-type
2001 - 3000cc Peter Collins / Paul Frére Aston Martin DB3S
1501 - 2000cc Peter Wilson / Jim Mayers Bristol 450 C
1101 - 1500cc Richard von Frankenberg / Helmut Polensky Porsche 550
751 - 1100cc Zora Arcus-Duntov / Auguste Veuillet Porsche 356
501 - 750cc Louis Cornet / Robert Mougin D.B. Panhard
Please Note: You can sort this listing by simply clicking on the column heading
Team / Entrant
Car - Engine
Driver, Nationality
1
1
6
Jaguar Cars Ltd, GB
Jaguar D-type
Mike Hawthorn, GB
Ivor Bueb, GB
DNS Jimmy Stewart, GB
DNS Norman Dewis, GB
DNS Robert E. Berry
DNS Tony Rolt, GB
3442
L6
S 5.0
307
4135,380
-
2
2
23
Aston Martin Ltd, GB
Aston Martin DB3 S
Peter Collins, GB
Paul Frére, B
2922
L6
S 3.0
302
4073,020
-
3
3
10
Ecurie Francorchamps, B
Jaguar D-type
Johnny Claes, B
Jacques Swaters, B
DNS Roger Larurent, B
DNS Olivier Gendebien, B
DNS André Pilette, B
3442
L6
S 5.0
296
3986,930
-
4
4
37
(Dr Ing hcF) Porsche KG, D
Porsche 550/4 RS 1500 Spyder
Helmut Polensky, D
Richard von Frankenberg, D
DNS Josef Jeser, D
1498
F4
S 1.5
284
3829,730
-
5
5
66
Equipe Nationale Belge / Gustave Olivier, B/F
Porsche 550/4 RS 1500 Spyder
Wolfgang Seidel, D
Olivier Gendebien, B
DNS André Milhoux, B
DNS Pierre Stasse, B
DNS Johnny Claes, B
1498
F4
S 1.5
276
3715,550
-
6
6
62
(Dr Ing hcF) Porsche KG, D
Porsche 550/4 RS 1500 Spyder
Helm Glöckler, D
Jaroslav Juhan, GUAT
1498
F4
S 1.5
273
3679,670
-
7
7
34
Bristol Aeroplane Co, GB
Bristol 450C (Open)
Peter S. Wilson, GB
Jim Mayers, GB
DNS Mike Keen, GB
DNS Tommy Line, GB
DNS David Blakely, GB
1979
L6
S 2.0
271
3654,310
-
8
8
33
Bristol Aeroplane Co, GB
Bristol 450C (Open)
Mike Keen, GB
Tommy Line, GB
DNS Jimmy Mayers, GB
DNS Peter S. Wilson, GB
DNS David Blakely, GB
1979
L6
S 2.0
270
3641,380
-
9
9
32
Bristol Aeroplane Co, GB
Bristol 450C (Open)
Tommy Wisdom, GB
Jack Fairman, GB
DNS Tommy Line, GB
1979
L6
S 2.0
268
3614,400
-
10
10
35
Automobiles Frazer Nash Ltd, GB
Frazer-Nash Sebring
Marcel Becquart, F
Richard 'Dickie' Stoop, GB
1971
L6
S 2.0
260
3506,160
-
11
11
40
Edgar Fronteras
Osca MT-4 1500
Guilio Cabianca, I
Roberto Scorbati, I
DNS Carlos Braniff
DNS Javier Velasquez
DNS Edgar Fronteras
1491
L4
S 1.5
256
3449,080
-
12
12
41
MG Cars Ltd, GB
MG EX 182
Ken Miles, GB/USA
Johnny Lockett, GB
1489
L4
S 1.5
249
3353,910
-
13
13
49
(Dr Ing hcF) Porsche KG, D
Porsche 550/4 Spyder
Auguste Veuillet, F
Zora Arcus-Duntov, USA
1097
L4
S 1.1
245
3303,570
-
14
14
28
Standard Triumph Ltd, GB
Triumph TR2
Robert 'Bob' Dickson, GB
Ninian Sanderson, GB
DNS Ken Richardson, GB
DNS Bert Hadley, GB
1991
L4
S 2.0
242
3263,310
-
15
15
29
Standard Triumph Ltd, GB
Triumph TR2
Ken Richardson, GB
Bert Hadley, GB
DNS Robert 'Bob' Dickson, GB
DNS Ninian Sanderson, GB
1991
L4
S 2.0
242
3263,150
-
16
16
63
Ecurie Jeudy-Bonnet, F
D.B. HBR - Panhard
Louis Cornet, F
Robert Mougin, F
745
F2
S 750
236
3177,890
-
17
17
64
MG Cars Ltd, GB
MG EX 182
Ted Lund, GB
Hans Waeffler, CH
1490
L4
S 1.5
234
3156,250
-
18
18
65
Gustave Olivier, F
Porsche 550/4 Spyder
Gustave Olivier, F
Josef Jeser, D
DNS Auguste Veuillet, F
1498
F4
S 1.5
234
3155,310
-
19
19
68
Standard Triumph Ltd, GB
Triumph TR2
Leslie Brooke, GB
Mortimer Morris-Goodall, GB
DNS John H. Walton, GB
1991
L4
S 2.0
214
2885,640
-
20
20
59
Ecurie Jeudy-Bonnet, F
D.B. HBR - Panhard
Georges Trouis, F
Louis Héry, F
745
F2
S 750
209
2815,140
-
21
21
47
Cooper Car Co, GB
Cooper T39 - Coventry Climax
Edgar Wadsworth, GB
John Brown, GB
DNS John Cooper, GB
DNS Ivor Bueb, GB
1097
L4
S 1.1
207
2789,610
-
22
DNF
16
Officine Alfieri Maserati, I
Maserati 300 S
Luigi Musso, I
Luigi 'Gino' Valenzano, I
DNS Jean Behra, F
DNS Cesare Perdisa, I
2991
L6
S 3.0
239
20h
Transmission / Gearbox
23
DNF
22
Briggs Cunningham, USA
Cunningham C6-R - Offenhauser
Briggs Cunningham, USA
Sherwood Johnston, USA
DNS Phil Walters, USA
DNS John Fitch, USA
DNS William 'Bill' Spear, GB
2946
L4
S 3.0
196
19h
Piston
24
DNF
7
Jaguar Cars Ltd, GB
Jaguar D-type
Tony Rolt, GB
Duncan Hamilton, GB
DNS Norman Dewis, GB
DNS Robert E. Berry,
DNS Jimmy Stewart, GB
3442
L6
S 5.0
186
16h
Fuel leak
Gearbox
25
DNF
52
Société Monopole, F
Monopole X88 (X86 ?) - Panhard
Jean Hémard, F
Pierre Flahault, F
DNS Jean de Montremy, F
DNS Jean Herman, F
DNS Eugene Dussous, F
747
F2
S 750
145
23h
Accident
26
DNF
30
Automobiles Gordini, F
Gordini T15 S (T20 ?)
Jacques Pollet, F
Hermano 'Nano' Da Silva Ramos, F/BR
DNS Roger Loyer, F
DNS Roland Bourel, F
1987
L8
S 2.0
145
14h
Holed radiator
27
DNF
60
Automobili Stanguellini, I
Stanguellini 750 Bialbero
René Philippe Faure, F
Pierre Duval, F
DNS Georges Guyot, F
740
L4
S 750
136
17h
Ignition
28
DNF
19
Daimler Benz AG, D
Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR
Juan Manuel Fangio, RA
Stirling Moss, GB
DNS Rudolf Uhlenhaut, D
2975
L8
S 3.0
134
10h
Withdrawn
29
DNF
21
Daimler Benz AG, D
Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR
Karl Kling, D
André Simon, F
DNS Rudolf Uhlenhaut, D
DNS Hans Herrmann, D
DNS "Pierre Levegh", F
DNS John Fitch, USA
2975
L8
S 3.0
130
10h
Withdrawn
30
DNF
51
Automobiles Panhard et Levassor, F
Panhard VM5
René Cotton, F
André Beaulieux, F
850
F2
S 1.1
108
13h
Gearbox
31
DNF
5
Scuderia Ferrari, I
Ferrari 121 LM (446S Spyder) (118LM Scaglietti ?)
Maurice Trintignant, F
Harry Schell, F/USA
4412
L6
S 5.0
107
10h
Overheating ?
Clutch
32
DNF
8
Jaguar Cars Ltd, GB
Jaguar D-type
Don Beauman, GB
Norman Dewis, GB
DNS Robert E. Berry
DNS Desmond Titterington, GB
3442
L6
S 5.0
106
11h
Accident, sandtrapped
33
DNF
24
Aston Martin Ltd, GB
Aston Martin DB3 S
Roy Salvadori, GB
Peter Walker, GB
DNS Reg Parnell, GB
2922
L6
S 3.0
105
10h
Engine
34
DNF
12
"Heldé", F
Ferrari 750 Monza
"Heldé" (Pierre Louis-Dreyfus), F
Jean Lucas, F
3000
L4
S 3.0
104
10h
Ignition
35
DNF
58
Ecurie Jeudy-Bonnet, F
D.B. HBR - Panhard
Paul Armagnac, F
Gérard Laureau, F
DNS Claude Storez, F
DNS Marc Gignoux, F
745
F2
S 750
101
22h
Wheel bearings
36
DQ/
DNF
48
Lotus Engineering, GB
Lotus Mk 9 - Coventry Climax
Colin Chapman, GB
Ron Flockhart, GB
DNS Peter Jopp, GB
DNS Gordon Wilkins, GB
1097
L4
S 1.1
99
12h
Disqualifed:
reversed
37
DNF
50
Automobiles Panhard et Levassor, F
Panhard VM5
Pierre Chancel, F
Robert Chancel, F
850
F2
S 1.1
94
11h
Out of fuel / fuel system
38
DNF
31
Officine Alfieri Maserati, I
Maserati 200 S (A6GCS ?)
Carlo Tomasi, I
Francesco Giardini, F
DNS Gino Valenzano, I
DNS Jean Thepenier, F
1986
L4
S 2.0
96
9h
Ignition
39
DNF
1
Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd, GB
Lagonda DP166
Reg Parnell, GB
Dennis Poore, GB
4487
V12
S 5.0
93
8h
Out of fuel
40
DNF
25
Aston Martin Ltd, GB
(Maurice Gatsonides, NL ?)
Aston Martin DB3 S
Tony Brooks, GB
John Riseley-Pritchard, GB
DNS Maurice Gatsonides, NL
DNS Marcel Becquart, F
DNS Jean van Pelt,
2922
L6
S 3.0
83
9h
Battery
41
DNF
27
Jean-Paul Colas, F
Salmson 2300S Spyder
Jean-Paul Colas, F
"Franc" (Jacques Dewez), F
DNS Herve Coatalen, F
2328
L4
S 3.0
82
9h
Oil leak
42
DNF
3
Scuderia Ferrari, I
Ferrari 121 LM (118 LM Scaglietti ?)
Umberto Maglioli, I
Phil Hill, USA
DNS Guiseppe Farina, I
4412
L6
S 5.0
76
7h
Clutch
Cooling system
43
DNF
38
Walter Ringgenberg, CH
Porsche 550/4 Spyder
Walter Ringgenberg, CH
Hans-Jörg Gilomen, CH
DNS Hans Stanek,
DNS William Honegger,
1489
F4
S 1.5
65
8h
Engine
44
DNF
43
Connaught Engineering, GB
Connaught AL/SR - Lea Francis
Kenneth McAlpine, GB
Eric Thompson, GB
DNS Don Beauman, GB
1484
L4
S 1.5
60
9h
Engine
45
DNF
69
Alexandre Constantin, F
Constantin C Barquette - Peugeot 203
Jacques Savoye, F
Jacques Poch, F
1978
L4
S 2.0
51
52
9h
Transmission / Gearbox
46
DNF
4
Scuderia Ferrari, I
Ferrari 121 LM (446S Spyder)
Eugenio Castellotti, I
Count Paolo Marzotto, I
DNS Piero Taruffi, I
DNS Luigi Villoresi, I
DNS Alberto Ascari, I
4412
L6
S 5.0
52
5h
Engine
47
DNF
46
Kieft Cars Ltd, GB
Kieft - Coventry Climax
Alan Rippon, GB
Bill Merrick, GB
DNS Georges Trouis, F
1097
L4
S 1.1
47
6h
Oil leak
48
DNF
9
Briggs S. Cunningham, USA
Jaguar D-type
William 'Bill' Spear, USA
Phil Walters, USA
DNS Sherwood Johnston, USA
DNS Briggs Cunningham, USA
DNS John Fitch, USA
3442
L6
S 5.0
43
7h
Ignition
49
DNF
57
Ecurie Jeudy-Bonnet, F
D.B. HBR - Panhard
René Bonnet, F
Claude Storez, F
DNS Elie Bayol, F
745
F2
S 750
44
9h
Ignition
50
DNF
11
Cooper Car Co, GB
Cooper T38 - Jaguar
Peter Whitehead, GB
Graham Whitehead, GB
DNS Peter Walker, GB
DNS Ivor Bueb, GB
DNS Tony Gaze, AUS
3442
L6
S 5.0
38
4h
Oil pressure
51
DNF
20
Daimler Benz AG, D
Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR
"Pierre Levegh" (Pierre Bouillin), F*
John Fitch, USA (DND)
2975
L8
S 3.0
34
3 h
*Fatal accident
52
DNF
36
Automobiles Frazer Nash Ltd, GB
Frazer-Nash Sebring
Cecil Vard, IRL
Dick Odlum, GB (DND)
1971
L6
S 2.0
33
6h
Engine
53
DNF
53
Société Monopole, F
Monopole Sport X88 (X86 ?) - Panhard
Francis Navarro, F
Jean de Montrémy, F (DND)
DNS Eugene Dussous, F
747
F2
S 750
30
6h
Oil leak
54
DNF
26
Lance Macklin, GB
Austin Healey 100S
Lance Macklin, GB
Les Leston, GB (DND)
2662
L4
S 3.0
28
6h
Accident damage
55
DNF
42
MG Cars Ltd, GB
MG EX 182
Dick Jacobs, GB
Joe Flynn, IRL (DND)
1490
L4
S 1.5
27
6h
Accident
56
DNF
56
Automobiles VP, F
V.P. 166R - Renault
Yves Giraud-Cabantous, F
Yves Lesur, F (DND)
DNS Just-Emile Vernet, F
DNS de Croiselle, F
747
L4
S 750
26
8h
Engine
57
DNF
15
Officine Alfieri Maserati, I
Maserati 300 S
Roberto Miéres, RA
Cesare Perdisa, I (DND)
DNS Jean Behra, F
2991
L6
S 3.0
24
6h
Transmission / Gearbox
58
DNF
14
Mike Sparken, F
Ferrari 750 Monza
"Mike Sparken" (Michel Pobejersky), F
Masten Gregory, USA (DND)
DNS Francois Picard, F
3000
L4
S 3.0
23
3h
Engine
59
DNF
61
Nardi Automobili, I
Nardi 750 LM - Crosley
Nardi Bisilero - Giannini ?
Dr Mario Damonte, I
Roger Crovetto, F (DND)
DNS Gino Munaron, I
DNS Paul Graynet,
735
L4
S 750
5
3h
Accident
60
DNF
39
Kieft Cars Ltd, GB
Kieft - Coventry Climax
Kieft - Turner ?
Berwyn Baxter, GB
John Deeley, GB (DND)
1493
L4
S 1.5
4
2h
Engine / Overheating
61
DNS
2
Ecurie Rosier, F
(Automobiles Talbot Lago ?)
Talbot Lago Sport
Louis Rosier, F
Georges Grignard, F
DNS Jean Blanc, F
-
L6
S 5.0
-
-
62
DNS
17
Automobiles Gordini, F
Gordini T24S
Elie Bayol, F
Robert Manzon, F
DNS André Guelfi, F
DNS Roland Bourel, F
3000
L8
S 3.0
-
Accident in practice
63
DNS
54
Moretti Automobili, I
Moretti 750 Grand Sport (750S ?)
DNS Antonio 'Toni' Branca, CH
Lino Fayen, YV/F
Herman Rogenry,
750
L4
S 750
-
Too late for starting grid.
64
DNS
55
Moretti Automobili, I
Moretti 750 Grand Sport
Giorgio Ubezzi, I
Mesnest Bellanger
DNS Herman Rogenry
750
L4
S 750
-
D:o
65
DNS
45
D. Arnott, GB
Arnott Sports - Coventry Climax
Jim Russell, GB
Peter Taylor, GB
DNS Dennis Taylor, GB
DNS Ivor Bueb, GB
DNS George S. Thornton, GB
DNS Victor Ridge, GB
DNS Daphne M. Arnott, GB
DNS Les Leston, GB
1100
L4
S 1.1
-
Accident in practice
66
DNS
70
Pierre Ferry, F
Ferry F750 - Renault
Jacques Blanche, F
Louis Pons, F
DNS Jesu Fritsch
DNS Jean Redelé, F
750
L4
S 750
-
Reserve entry
67
DNS
72
Automobiles V.P., F
VP 155 R - Renault
Jean-Marie Dumazer, F
André Héchard, F
Jerome Pourond, F
750
L4
S 750
-
Reserve entry
68
DNS
73
Ecurie Rosier, F
Renault 4CV 1063
Jean-Louis Rosier, F
Jean Estager, F
Louis Rosier, F
750
L4
S 750
-
Reserve entry
69
DNA
2
Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd, GB
Lagonda DP166
-
-
4487
V12
S 5.0
-
-
70
DNA
18
Automobiles Gordini, F
Gordini T32 S
Jacques Pollet, F
'Nano' da Silva Ramos, BR/F
DNS Charles de Clareur, F
3000
L8
S 3.0
-
-
71
DNA
44
Officine Alfieri Maserati, I
Maserati 150 S
-
-
1484
L4
S 1.5
-
-
72
DNA
71
Officine Alfieri Maserati
Maserati 150 S
-
-
1484
L4
S 1.5
-
-
73
DNA
47
Jacques Peron, F
Osca MT-4
Jacques Peron, F
-
-
L4
S 1.1
-
-
74
DNA
67
Henri Peignaux, F
Jaguar D-type
Henri Peignaux, F
Jean-Marie Brousselet, F
3442
L6
S 5.0
-
-
75
DNA
68
Yves Giraud-Cabantous, F
Ferrari 750 Monza
Yves Giraud-Cabantous, F
-
3000
L4
S 3.0
-
-
76
DNA
-
Osca Automobili, I
Osca MT-4
-
-
1100
L4
S 1.1
-
Entry not accepted
77
DNA
-
Osca Automobili, I
Osca MT-4
-
-
1100
L4
S 1.1
-
Entry not accepted
78
DNA
-
Osca Automobili, I
Osca MT-4
-
-
1100
L4
S 1.1
-
Entry not accepted
79
DNA
-
Moretti Automobili, I
Moretti 750 S
-
-
750
L4
S 750
-
Entry not accepted
80
DNA
-
Nardi Automobili, I
Nardi 750 LM - Crosley
-
-
750
L4
S 750
-
Entry not accepted
81
DNA
-
Automobiles Panhard et Levassor, F
Panhard X88
-
-
750
F2
S 750
-
Entry not accepted
82
DNA
-
Automobiles Panhard et Levassor, F
Panhard X88
-
-
750
F2
S 750
-
Entry not accepted
83
DNA
-
Lotus Engineering, GB
Lotus Mk 9 - Coventry Climax
-
-
1100
L4
S 1.1
-
Entry not accepted
84
DNA
-
Charles de Clareur, F
Gordini T 20 S
-
-
1987
L8
-
-
Entry not accepted
85
DNA
-
(Dr Ing hcF) Porsche KG, D
Porsche 550 Spyder
-
-
1498
F4
S 1.5
-
Entry not
accepted
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